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  #41  
Old 11-12-2012
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Re: Cleaning Hull in the water

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Swain
Millions of gallons of bleach get poured down drains by land lubbers all the time, with far less justification
.


You could sustitute the word holding tank sewerage here....I am hoping you dont do that with the same rationale...... doesnt make it right to do
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  #42  
Old 11-12-2012
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Re: Cleaning Hull in the water

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fstbttms View Post
So that makes it OK for you to do it? Jeezus.

Bleach is fine.

Quote:
. A Risk Assessment Report (RAR) conducted by the European Union on sodium hypochlorite conducted under Regulation EEC 793/93 concluded that this substance is safe for the environment in all its current, normal uses.[25] This is due to its high reactivity and instability. Disappearance of hypochlorite is practically immediate in the natural aquatic environment, reaching in a short time concentration as low as 10−22 μg/L or less in all emission scenarios. In addition, it was found that while volatile chlorine species may be relevant in some indoor scenarios, they have negligible impact in open environmental conditions. Further, the role of hypochlorite pollution is assumed as negligible in soils.
On a less scientific note....Remember mums all over the world wash diapers in it and have any babies got a burned bum?
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  #43  
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Re: Cleaning Hull in the water

Yes, and it didn't take long to find a source saying that chlorine beach is very bad when introduced into the environment:

"Unfortunately, chlorine also poses a significant risk to the environment, and was even used as a chemical weapon during World War I. Many countries have banned chlorine bleach or restricted its use in an effort to protect the environment and human health.
Water Pollution
Manufacturers who use chlorine bleach often release it into local water bodies along with other liquid industrial waste. Once it reaches the water, chlorine reacts with other minerals and elements to form a host of dangerous toxins. These toxins, including dioxins, furams and PCDDs are often referred to as "persistent organic pollutants" because they linger in the water or soil and take many years to disappear. Greenpeace calls dioxin one of the most dangerous chemicals known to science, and warns that it can contribute to cancer, endocrine disorders and other serious health effects. The West Virginia University Extension also links chlorine-based compounds, like dioxins, with low sperm count, testicular cancer and breast cancer due to their ability to mimic human hormones."


The Effects Of Chlorine Bleach On The Environment | LIVESTRONG.COM
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  #44  
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Re: Cleaning Hull in the water

Mine was Wikipedia. I should have quoted it.


What is law is law. When someone changes it I will listen.
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Re: Cleaning Hull in the water

Bleach. It's hard to know who to believe anymore, as most decide first, then look for evidence.

I have to admit, the Livestrong article seems low on scientific reference and quickly jumps to dioxins. While pointing out that bald eagles were nearly decimated by dioxins, being an article on bleach are we to believe that bleach killed the bald eagles? It also refers to bleach being a chemical weapon, but it did need to be combined with other chemicals, which was left out. Charcoal becomes gunpowder if you mix it with other chemicals. I'm still happy to have charcoal around.

If I were to guess, because its all we are usually left to do with environ issues anymore, bleach toxicity to the environment is most likely a function of concentration. Personally, I would never pour it straight into the water, but I can't say I know why.
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Re: Cleaning Hull in the water

I have found that an ice scraperworks well on the barnacles
without to much damage to the bottom coat.
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Re: Cleaning Hull in the water

Back in the 60's a device similar to that described by Brent was widely used, called a "boat bath" it was a plastic liner in your slip. After you pulled the boat in you poured in a gallon of bleach, they worked well and you didn't need to clean the bottom between races.
We also used bleach to catch octopus by pouring bleach over a rock at low tide and gaffing them when they scrambled out. Don't know how much this affected the environment but the octopi sure didn't like it.
Either practice will land you in jail here now.
I used to clean bottoms in my youth, it is truly a PITA, I think most divers are a bargain, you couldn't afford what I would charge.
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Re: Cleaning Hull in the water

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Originally Posted by capttb View Post
Back in the 60's a device similar to that described by Brent was widely used, called a "boat bath" it was a plastic liner in your slip.
These are still around. Seem to me most widely used in Oz. Don't see them so much here in the States. And yes, the dirty little secret about their use is that they require regular additions of chlorine.
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Re: Cleaning Hull in the water

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....I used to clean bottoms in my youth, it is truly a PITA, I think most divers are a bargain, you couldn't afford what I would charge.
Around here, while they charge by the foot, it equates to around $100 per hour.

There is overhead and travel time between jobs that waters down the profit. However, I think it's keeping the calendar full that's the issue, which you know here will go to zero for 6 months per year. Otherwise, it seems it can be a petty good living.
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Re: Cleaning Hull in the water

Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnewaska View Post
I think it's keeping the calendar full that's the issue, which you know here will go to zero for 6 months per year. Otherwise, it seems it can be a petty good living.


Most of the U.S. recrational boating market is on the water 12 months per year. It's not keeping the calendar full that's the issue for busy hull cleaners. On the contrary, the issue is finding enough time and reliable help to get all of the work done.
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