Woodworking advice needed - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 10-29-2012
Barquito's Avatar
Barquito
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,933
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Barquito is on a distinguished road
Woodworking advice needed

I have some water damage to the top corner of by bulkheads. This is from leaking chainplates (now fixed). The chainplates connect to separate knees, so, I'm not too worried about structural stength. My question is, what is the technique for replacing just that small (maybe a square foot) section? I'm also not going to get too worried about matching the existing veneer.
__________________
Bristol 27
Cirque
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 10-29-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Naniamo B.C.
Posts: 1,709
Thanks: 2
Thanked 24 Times in 24 Posts
Rep Power: 3
Capt Len is on a distinguished road
Re: Woodworking advice needed

If it's just plywood a Dremell occelating can easily cut out a chunk right up to the cabin top/sides. Half inch (filled) epoxy glue holds the newly fitted piece . with care the veneers could look decent If it's glassed to the cabin its a bit off prep work with a chisel and mallet. At least you'd be working out of the weather.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 10-29-2012
Tim R.'s Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Portland, Maine
Posts: 1,541
Thanks: 1
Thanked 27 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Tim R. is on a distinguished road
Re: Woodworking advice needed

Photos would help. Can you repair structurally and then cover with some solid teak trim?
__________________
Tim R.
Out cruising
1997 Caliber 40LRC

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

-----------------------------------------------------
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 10-29-2012
SloopJonB's Avatar
Senior Moment Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: West Vancouver B.C.
Posts: 10,662
Thanks: 56
Thanked 48 Times in 45 Posts
Rep Power: 4
SloopJonB will become famous soon enough
Re: Woodworking advice needed

Quote:
Originally Posted by treilley View Post
Photos would help. Can you repair structurally and then cover with some solid teak trim?
Yeah - if the stained/damaged piece is the right shape you could make a "hanging knee" shaped piece of trim to cover it.

See if you can find pictures of the main bulkhead of a Yankee 38 - they had an arrangement sort of like that.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
I, myself, personally intend to continue being outspoken and opinionated, intolerant of all fanatics, fools and ignoramuses, deeply suspicious of all those who have "found the answer" and on my bad days, downright rude.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 10-29-2012
emoney's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 545
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 5
emoney is on a distinguished road
Re: Woodworking advice needed

It really is all about the photos in this case. Plus, how important is the finished look? Hard to imagine, but if at least one side of it "won't show" so-to-speak, you can use epoxy and then put a support strip that lays across both sides of the joint on the back side. How thick is the area in question? Any chance it's thick enough to cut a scarf joint, or no? Again, pics would help a ton.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 10-30-2012
Barquito's Avatar
Barquito
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,933
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Barquito is on a distinguished road
Re: Woodworking advice needed

Can't get out to the boat to take pictures until this weekend. Actually, if it gets blasted off it's mooring in Milwaukee (thanks Sandy, we are getting 48kt gusts), then this thread will be moot.

Quote:
Any chance it's thick enough to cut a scarf joint, or no?
I think is is 3/4" ply. How would I go about cutting a scarf joint with the majority of the bulkhead still in place? I think once I make the repair I will just put a "knee joint" like piece of trim over the patches. OTOH, if the very corner of this bulkhead doesn't lend much to the overall strength and stiffness, would it be crazy to just cover it, and not repair?
__________________
Bristol 27
Cirque
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 10-30-2012
emoney's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 545
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 5
emoney is on a distinguished road
Re: Woodworking advice needed

Odds are you'd need to remove it and then replace it to cut a scarf joint. A lot depends on how good you are with a small skill saw, and do you even have access to it. If it's not part of the structural integrity and it won't look terribly odd, nothing's stopping you from not repairing it. As a matter of fact, if it fits both those criteria you always have the option of doing that to the opposite side to make them match. Of course, having said that out loud, usually the corners tend to bear a lot of the load, if the bulkhead is, in fact, designed to add stiffness. How big of a piece is the entire bulkhead? Not something you want to just replace the entire thing?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 10-30-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 138
Thanks: 1
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 6
VallelyJ is on a distinguished road
Re: Woodworking advice needed

Why a scarf joint? If that part of the bulkhead is structurally important, then you need to install your patch with a joint that is as strong as the bulkhead was before you cut it. You also need to join the patch to the cabintop/cabin side in the same way that the original piece did--probably tabs.
A scarf joint's strength will depend on precise, accurate saw cuts. It will also require the right amount of the right glue, and good clamping. You probably can't do it with the bulkhead in place unless you're really good with hand tools--really sharp hand tools. Even then, I'd question it's strength. I doubt you'll have clearance for a skill saw, and if you do, you better know how to use it accurately. Any fenceless type of power saw that relies on a steady hand, forget.
If you don't care about looks, maybe use tabbing all around. After all, it's strong enough to bond the bulkhead to the boat. And it won't require precise cutting. If looks are important, buy some nice plywod, tear out the bulkhead, use it as a template for a new one and tab it in place. It's probably going to be easier in the long run. Or, make an ugly-but-strong patch and cover the whole bulkhead with door skin or something else relatively inexpensive.
If you patch, cut the patch first. Use it to carefully trace the outline that you want to excise from the bulkhead.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 10-30-2012
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Kansas City
Posts: 50
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
Jurgy is on a distinguished road
Re: Woodworking advice needed

My repairs always look like repairs. It would just "ugly" up the boat if I tried to patch the plywood.

With the proper amount of Capt'n & Coke, try to visualize a rework of the area. Its probably a little dark inside the Bristol, so using white formica, a half panel coming down the bulkhead to just below the portlights, trimed in teak would cover the repair and brighten up the interior. Adding a small shelf (or 19" flat screen) on the white panel would even make the space usable.

Also, because this would cover the repair, you can follow the old woodworker's guide, "When in doubt, make it stout".

Hope your boat came thru the blow okay.

Jurgy
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 10-30-2012
Barquito's Avatar
Barquito
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,933
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Barquito is on a distinguished road
Re: Woodworking advice needed

Quote:
Its probably a little dark inside the Bristol.
Hey, I resemble that remark.

I like the getting-buried-in-a-pile-of-finished-wood look of the interior of older boats.

I will have to take a closer look to see where the tabbing is. I know it is strongly attached at the bottom. The spot in question is just under the area where the dog house meets the deck. So far, there are no concerns about stiffness, as this boat will probably never meet anything more than Great Lakes chop (OTOH, that is 25'ers today). So far, there are no concerns about stiffness.
__________________
Bristol 27
Cirque
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Advice needed Sixpoint General Discussion (sailing related) 11 05-05-2011 12:21 PM
Bandsaw trick, Well we don't have a woodworking forum! deniseO30 Gear & Maintenance 18 01-23-2011 09:08 PM
More RIB Advice Needed danielgoldberg Boat Review and Purchase Forum 8 12-28-2008 10:54 AM
woodworking on boats langousta Gear & Maintenance 6 06-02-2006 01:01 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:01 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.