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  #1  
Old 11-03-2012
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Question Polyester sling for chafe control

Seeing videos of the destruction left by Sandy got me to thinking about anchoring in serious storm conditions. I'm certain I read a thread concerning this subject a few months ago but I can't seem to find it with the search function so forgive me if I beat a dead horse here.

I've read that chafe tends to happen at points where the rode passes through chocks or over coamings even though chocks may be smooth and properly sized. I've also read that polyester is more resistant to chafe than nylon but provides less stretch and shock absorption. As I recall in the other thread, I believe that several people mentioned using a short bridle or pennant running from the cleat, through chocks, then attaching the bridle/pennant to the rode. I think it was mentioned that they were available commercially although some made their own. I do wish I could have found that thread again...

Would a heavier polyester sling such as this
[URL="http://www.rigging.com/shop/index.php?target=categories&category_id=222"]

work any better at helping reduce chafe than would a nylon bridle? I could be wrong but it seemed to me that the straight inner strands wouldn't rub and generate as much heat as would a line that is twisted. Also, both the inner strands and the exterior covering are made of polyester. We use these types of slings at work and they hold up well even while wrapping them around and lifting concrete beams during a bridge demolition. Any opinions or does anyone use something like this? If so, how well does it perform in a marine environment?

Thanks all.

Last edited by Dean101; 11-03-2012 at 05:29 AM.
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Old 11-03-2012
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Re: Polyester sling for chafe control

I have eye-spliced some dacron (Samson XLS) pennants for dock lines. They drop over the cleats, and end a little outboard of the chocks. I "luggage-tag" or "larkshead" the regular nylon dock lines to the pennants. I also use double dock lines (one relatively light, and one a little longer and more robust), so that I get a "springy" action from the lighter line, then if there is sufficient loading, the robust line takes over. After a full season, no discernable chafe. I recommend it.
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Old 11-03-2012
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Re: Polyester sling for chafe control

It seems like what you are describing is a bridle. Every multihull uses one every night when anchored (OK, a few don't). The bridle has chafe gear where it crosses chocks, which is easily renewed since it is not a part of the rode. If chain is used, some sort of chain hook attached the bridle to the chain. If it is a fiber rode, either a rolling hitch or some other sort of gripping hitch. I have never heard of chafe at that point, as the hitch firmly pinches the rode.

What material? Usually nylon for the stretch, since the chain has none. The sailors figure on replacing them if they get worn. However, since it is easy to use heavy chafe gear, that is a slow process. They are generally replaced when their springness is reduced.

IF I were using a fiber rode, the bridle could certainly be something non-stretch. As a prior poster described, reducing movement between the cleat and the chock with a low-stretch line (or moving the cleat closer to the chock) will reduce wear. Too fiddly for most folks, but absolutely correct.
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Old 11-03-2012
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Re: Polyester sling for chafe control

Pvanv1 - I've read that nylon has around 10% stretch and polyester is closer to 3%. How does dacron measure up to the other two fibers when it comes to stretch?

Pdqaltair - I know it may be too fiddly for some but I will be taking a close interest in the wellfare of my boat. If a little extra work prior to a bad storm event will save my boat and potentially someone else's, then I'm all for it. The link I posted in my OP looked rather funny. I may not have posted it correctly so I'm not sure if you guys saw what I was refering to. It is a polyester crane sling with straight polyester fibers on the inside and wrapped with a polyester sleeve to protect them. I haven't yet created a photo album on the web nor have I read up on posting pictures here in the forum but I probably need to. It would have been better if I had posted a picture.

Using a system like that in my OP, would there be a problem with chafe where the nylon rode is bent onto the larger polyester pennant?
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Old 11-03-2012
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Re: Polyester sling for chafe control

Dacron is a trade name for polyester.

Compared to Nylon, polyester has slightly greater abrasion resistance but as it stretches less, it generates less abrasion at the chocks. It also has a slightly higher melting point and generates less heat because of less stretch and therefore less friction so, under extreme conditions, it is less lightly to fuse, become inflexible and fail. The method described by Paul works well as do similar variation which uses polyester at the abrasion points, however chafe protection should still be used if conditions warrant.

While the sling might work fine, Iíll stick with cordage that I understand until someone convinces me otherwise.
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Old 11-04-2012
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Re: Polyester sling for chafe control

The rope that cavers use is very wear resistant (it rubs against rock a lot) and is very NON-stretchy unlike rock climbing rope. It has to be non stretchy because if you ever try to climb a 600' length of rope, any bounce will make you sick. Best such rope is made by a company called PMI in Georgia. (Oh, it is Dacron with a hybrid outer sheath.
Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm......................why not make a sheath of this stuff that fits over your anchor rode at your cleat and fastens securely to said rode?
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Re: Polyester sling for chafe control

I was at a boat show a couple of years ago and looked at some of the high end boats with massive bronze chocks and cleats that were several feet away. I thought wow they are going to need some serious chafe protection with all the line stretch that will occur over that distance.

Then I walked by the Hunter display of their exceptionally ugly bubble boats. One thing caught my eye though. They all featured cleats that tilted outward so that dock or mooring lines led fair to the cleat with no rubbing on another surface at all. I thought that was some great design work, they engineered out the need for chocks and chafe protection all together!

Gary H. Lucas
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Old 11-04-2012
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Re: Polyester sling for chafe control

Quote:
Originally Posted by Frogwatch View Post
The rope that cavers use is very wear resistant (it rubs against rock a lot) and is very NON-stretchy unlike rock climbing rope. It has to be non stretchy because if you ever try to climb a 600' length of rope, any bounce will make you sick. Best such rope is made by a company called PMI in Georgia. (Oh, it is Dacron with a hybrid outer sheath.
Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm......................why not make a sheath of this stuff that fits over your anchor rode at your cleat and fastens securely to said rode?
I'm no cordage expert but seems to me that wear resistance over sharp rocks is more cut resistance and not quite the same at abrasion at smooth(ish) chocks. What is the hybrid sheath a hybrid of?

If we are going to go high-tech for our short anti-chafe lengths, then I would guess that an aramid core (very good for heat resistance, internal abrasion resistance, cut resistance, stretch and strength) in a polyester sheath (very good for external abrasion resistance), would be the way to go. But three times the price of polyester double braid. You could get an extra cover as well, if you want. Any real experts have an opinion?
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Old 11-04-2012
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Re: Polyester sling for chafe control

I didn't know that Dacron and polyester were one and the same thing. Huh. Learn something new every day.
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Old 11-04-2012
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Re: Polyester sling for chafe control

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryHLucas View Post
I was at a boat show a couple of years ago and looked at some of the high end boats with massive bronze chocks and cleats that were several feet away. I thought wow they are going to need some serious chafe protection with all the line stretch that will occur over that distance.

Then I walked by the Hunter display of their exceptionally ugly bubble boats. One thing caught my eye though. They all featured cleats that tilted outward so that dock or mooring lines led fair to the cleat with no rubbing on another surface at all. I thought that was some great design work, they engineered out the need for chocks and chafe protection all together!

Gary H. Lucas
Great idea, especially at a dock.

I have never had to anchor in extreme conditions but my plan was always to anchor from the stern and rig a bridle from the drogue mounting points to avoid chafe. I hope I'm not going to start an argument about anchoring.
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