SailNet Community

SailNet Community (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/)
-   Gear & Maintenance (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/)
-   -   Bright work buffer (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/94767-bright-work-buffer.html)

Minnewaska 12-07-2012 06:45 AM

Bright work buffer
 
Winter project. I've decided to go Obsessive Compulsive with my teak cockpit table. I usually just top coat it on the boat in the spring. This winter, I've brought it home to strip and redo. I haven't decided whether to redo with Epifanes varnish or the Bristol Finish that is on it now. The BF, being under the bimini, looks excellent and is much faster to lay multiple coats. But I only have about a pint and a half left and it seems they may be out of business.

This time, I'm going to wet sand the rebuilt finish and then buff it out with 3M Imperial and Finess-it.

I went out and bought a cheap $30 buffer and knew as soon as it came out of the box that it is going back. I'm looking at others and prices are from $100 to $300. I want a good professional tool. Any suggestions? Prefer electric, not pneumatic.

I have an old orbital sander, but could use a better one there as well. Although, what I have will get the stripping done.

chef2sail 12-07-2012 08:58 AM

Re: Bright work buffer
 
I have a Minkota 9227 buffer with 7 and 9 inch wheels. I bought it for work on compounding the hull primarily per a recommendation from Mainsail. It has an easi;y adjustable control for the rpm and erogonmically is easy on the hands.

We redid our cockpit table 3 years ago. Stripped it with Circa 1850 varnish stripper before sanding in an outside garage using water color paint brushes to get into the small areas like the cup holders. I wound up using a dremel for the areas I couldnt get the buffer into.

Home Depot sells this
Circa 1850 Furniture Stripper

I did go for the eppifanes gloss varnish and a clear poly coat on top. After 3 years still looks like the dat we did it. Shows you how much the UV destrpyed things as ours is under the bimini at the steering pedestal protected.

Dave

Tim R. 12-07-2012 09:51 AM

Re: Bright work buffer
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by chef2sail (Post 958214)
I have a Minkota 9227 buffer with 7 and 9 inch wheels. I bought it for work on compounding the hull primarily per a recommendation from Mainsail. It has an easi;y adjustable control for the rpm and erogonmically is easy on the hands.

We redid our cockpit table 3 years ago. Stripped it with Circa 1850 varnish stripper before sanding in an outside garage using water color paint brushes to get into the small areas like the cup holders. I wound up using a dremel for the areas I couldnt get the buffer into.

Home Depot sells this
Circa 1850 Furniture Stripper

I did go for the eppifanes gloss varnish and a clear poly coat on top. After 3 years still looks like the dat we did it. Shows you how much the UV destrpyed things as ours is under the bimini at the steering pedestal protected.

Dave

Dave, I think you mean Makita 9227. Minkota makes electric trolling motors.

chef2sail 12-07-2012 12:51 PM

Re: Bright work buffer
 
Sorry I meant Makita...was typing from work and for some reason Minkota slipped into my brain ( which meant something else had to fall out)

Thanks for the correction

Tim R. 12-07-2012 01:20 PM

Re: Bright work buffer
 
No worries. I had just pictured a guy trying to buff with a trolling motor.:eek:

daddyhobbit 12-07-2012 01:58 PM

Re: Bright work buffer
 
Jamestown Distributers has one on sale for 199.00 with all kinds of polish and stuff. I am thinking about it being my Christmas present.

Jim
S/V Osprey

RichH 12-07-2012 02:04 PM

Re: Bright work buffer
 
For small buff jobs it really doesnt matter what the brand of 'buffer' you use ...
Whats really important is the 'quality' of the buffing pads and the quality of 'compounds' you use. The 3M 'knobby foam' pad is probably the very best to fill this need.
3M Perfect-It Foam Polishing Pad 05725 ... requires a special under pad and arbor.

You usually dont have to recoat before power buffing, only to fill the dings, etc. with the coating before rebuffing.

Usually all you have to do is wet flat-sand with upwards to 2000 grit, then buff with a knobby pad (needs special buffing under-disk and 'arbor') then use 3M Finese-it™, change to a new clean knobby pad, and then use 3M Perfect-it™.
If you need to remove 'waves' (lightwave different surface elevations) for 'supreme' flatness, then use 3M "DryGuide Coat Kit" during the flat sanding process.

This is how its done on the 'perfection' buff-out and to produce a mega-gloss finish on ultra/mega-yachts, private jet aircraft, mega-expensive musical instruments and 'concours quality' automobiles, etc. .... even when such surfaces are 'just' freshly coated. Its called 'finishing', a lost art.

CLucas 12-07-2012 02:11 PM

Re: Bright work buffer
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by treilley (Post 958319)
No worries. I had just pictured a guy trying to buff with a trolling motor.:eek:

Perhaps if you're going for a 'distressed' look...

Seriously though, +1 on the Makita. Harbor Freight has a cheapo copy but a feature-by-feature comparison shows that once again, you get what you pay for. My Makita is tough as nails -- wouldn't waste money on a knockoff.

MarkSF 12-07-2012 02:19 PM

Re: Bright work buffer
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by treilley (Post 958319)
No worries. I had just pictured a guy trying to buff with a trolling motor.:eek:

They do make great sanders though... if you are really in a hurry

Minnewaska 12-07-2012 03:10 PM

Re: Bright work buffer
 
Knew I came to the right place. Thanks all.

Prep work this weekend. I will order the buffer, wheels and polish. Still haven't decided on finish material.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:28 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012