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-   -   Epoxy or caulk to glue down teak cockpit seats? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/94846-epoxy-caulk-glue-down-teak-cockpit-seats.html)

copacabana 12-10-2012 06:18 AM

Epoxy or caulk to glue down teak cockpit seats?
 
Here is the background before the question ...

Over the weekend I managed to pry up all the teak cockpit seats and bring them home to refinish and restore. These are decorative wood panels made of teak strips with black polysulfide seams. The panels were glued to a formica sheet with thickened epoxy to make it a one-piece "panel". Then the seat panels were, originally, glued to the fiberglass seats with thickened resin. Over the years resin came unglued and some of the panels were re-glued with what looks like white polysulfide caulk. Some of the original panels glued down with thickened resin only partially came unglued and allowed water to get under the panels. Long story short: I will seal the under part of the panels with epoxy, re-do some of the black polysulfide seams and then re-install them in the cockpit. Here is my doubt ...

Should I glue the panels down with thickened epoxy or use a caulk like polysulfide (Sikaflex 220, for example)? :confused:

I worry that the thickened epoxy is too permanent and will be a lot of work to remove one day in the future. Eventually I will replace these cockpit seat panels with Plasteak ones (in my never-ending quest to reduce work on the boat).

If anyone has done this kind of thing before, please let me know what you used and how it has held up. Thanks in advance.

Cheers!

Minnewaska 12-10-2012 07:46 AM

Re: Epoxy or caulk to glue down teak cockpit seats?
 
I have a single board at the end corner of my cockpit sole whose caulking has leaked. When it rains, you can see that the end of this board doesn't dry and when you step on it, water squishes out through the caulk. The movement of the board to create the squishing is almost imperceptible. However, I suspect it was this movement that caused the caulk to fail in the first place.

Its a winter (maybe early spring) project for me to fix it. While I'm hoping to just dig out the surrounding caulk to allow it to dry thoroughly, rather than remove the entire board, I will have to get something under the board to stop any movement. I think injecting epoxy is going to make more sense than caulk to stop any movement in the imperceptibly warped board (or maybe its the sole that isn't perfectly flat).


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