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casey1999 01-31-2013 06:25 PM

Installing a Boom Brake
 
1 Attachment(s)
I am looking at installing a Boom Brake. I like the simplicity of the Wichard Jibe Easy system. It is expensive but it might save me and or my rig in an accidental jibe, so worth it for me.

Question is do I need to mount the two ends of the lines to the outside edge of the deck (at toe rail) or can I mount the end of the lines to the outside edge of the coach deck? I already have two stong tie points on the coach roof where the boom mainsheet used to be attached, but these points are only about 2 feet off each side of the boom. Would rather use these as I would not need to drill/ and install more pad eyes or attach to my chain plates, and would rather not have the lines set up as a trip hazard right across the path way leading to the bow.

Regards

stiffwind 01-31-2013 07:50 PM

Re: Installing a Boom Brake
 
The least expensive method would be to rig your own preventer. Either way, it does not appear that the coach top old traveller fixtures would be useful since the boom would be well outside those points when you need the preventer the most - running with the wind. I think you must have anchor points to the deck or rail at, or beyond, the point on the boom where the line will attachs.
I like everything run to the cockpit, so my preventer rig simply includes a detachable block that I clip onto a padeye around midship (on either port or starboard) and line runs from end of boom through the midship block and then back to the cockpit. When the boom is to the opposite side, I simply go forward, detach the block from the padeye and walk the block around the opposite side via the cockpit, snap on the block, and done. This set up would allow you to go forward at least on the side opposite the preventer rig without encountering those lines.
No way that I can figure to avoid lines across the outside decks.

casey1999 01-31-2013 07:58 PM

Re: Installing a Boom Brake
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by stiffwind (Post 983920)
The least expensive method would be to rig your own preventer. Either way, it does not appear that the coach top old traveller fixtures would be useful since the boom would be well outside those points when you need the preventer the most - running with the wind. I think you must have anchor points to the deck or rail at, or beyond, the point on the boom where the line will attachs.
I like everything run to the cockpit, so my preventer rig simply includes a detachable block that I clip onto a padeye around midship (on either port or starboard) and line runs from end of boom through the midship block and then back to the cockpit. When the boom is to the opposite side, I simply go forward, detach the block from the padeye and walk the block around the opposite side via the cockpit, snap on the block, and done. This set up would allow you to go forward at least on the side opposite the preventer rig without encountering those lines.
No way that I can figure to avoid lines across the outside decks.

I think you have a good method. Where do you attach the line to the boom? At the end of the boom or somewhere along its mid section? If I could attach at the mid section I think I could get that to work.
Regards

TejasSailer 02-01-2013 06:45 AM

Re: Installing a Boom Brake
 
I used the information in these two guides to select the mounting points.

http://www.wichard.com/documents/notice_gyb_easy.pdf

http://www.mvbinfo.com/images/BB_om.pdf

aa3jy 02-01-2013 07:30 AM

Re: Installing a Boom Brake
 
This one came with our boat..

FAQ about boom brakes - Boom Brake Walder

..though it appears to be a bit pricy it works well

nigos 02-01-2013 09:17 AM

Winchard
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by casey1999 (Post 983866)
I am looking at installing a Boom Brake. I like the simplicity of the Wichard Jibe Easy system. It is expensive but it might save me and or my rig in an accidental jibe, so worth it for me.

Question is do I need to mount the two ends of the lines to the outside edge of the deck (at toe rail) or can I mount the end of the lines to the outside edge of the coach deck? I already have two stong tie points on the coach roof where the boom mainsheet used to be attached, but these points are only about 2 feet off each side of the boom. Would rather use these as I would not need to drill/ and install more pad eyes or attach to my chain plates, and would rather not have the lines set up as a trip hazard right across the path way leading to the bow.

Regards

Last year we installed a Winchard Boom Brake on a new Sabre 426. The brake was attached to a Leisure Furl boom and we initially ran both ends through blocks attached to the base of the shrouds that were forward of the boom attachment point and then tied off the lines at mid sheet cleats on either side of the boat. This turned out to be a very bad idea for several reasons. The lines to the brake must be very very tight for the device to work properly irrespective of whether we position the line through the top or the lower portion of the device. The attachment of the Winchard to the boom using a shackle allows a lot lateral movement which impacted the performance of the brake. This is one reason we had to make the line running through the winchard very tight. The difficulty with the tight line is it placed a lot of downward pressure on the boom which affects both sailing performance depending upon whether one is going upwind or downwind but more importantly with the winchard line tightened one cannot properly operate the Leisure furling boom i.e. the boom angle is low. We have solved these problems by running the Winchard line on both sides to a block tied to the base of the shrouds and then back to a sheave in the deck organizer and then we back to rope clutches on the cabin top so that we can increase or release pressure. Although all of this may seem a bit complex, the Winchard really is a great device.

Time Traveler 02-01-2013 09:39 PM

Re: Installing a Boom Brake
 
Casey --- we set up a GybeEasy on Annie last year. Initially secured it to an eye where the aftermost shroud attaches to its chainplate. Simple and strong but meant high-stepping over the line every time we went forward. PITA

Ultimately, we installed robust padeyes at the outer edges of the coach roof and are very happy with with the setup now. Only trick was getting the geometry right. The drawings accompanying the GybeEasy were of some help but we fine-tuned the location of the padeyes as follows:

1. Decide where on the boom to secure the GybeEasy itself. We used a stop to attach the GE just aft of the vang mount. Using a strop is simple, shipshape, more than strong enough, and avoids non-critical holes in the boom.

2. Locate the padeye mounting points by trial-and-error. Run a light line (or tape measure) from one coach roof edge through the GE and over to the other edge of the roof. Tug the test line taut while swinging the boom as if jibing from one extreme to the other.

Just get the hang of this, try it first with the test line intersecting the roof edges about even with the GE. You'll see that if you start with the line taut and the boom centered, the boom jams as you move it outboard. Or, if you start with the boom outboard, the line gets way too slack as you move towards the centerline.

Keep moving the edge-intersection points forward until you can swing the boom from one extreme to the other with a minimum of slack at the centerline. At this sweet spot, the GE will operate smoothly from one extreme to the other.

A bit of slack as you pass over the centerline is no problem. It's the reverse that you want to avoid. If your trial-error line gets tighter as it passes over the centerline, then the GE would be trying to drag the boom down as it jibed across. In other words, if you were on a run and you had already vanged the boom down tight, then the GE would be putting a terrific strain on the leech as the boom jibed across. Something would have to give.

Annie's boom is equipped with a hard vang. I assume the same trial error process would work with a topping lift set up. But before you drill holes for the padeyes, maybe it would be smart to run a trial with the sail up and vanged down tight.

SV Annie
PSC 37

stiffwind 02-02-2013 02:06 PM

Re: Installing a Boom Brake
 
Casey,
You can use a bridle so the attach point would be more mid boom area (but the load on the boom is spread out) or you can do what I do and simply attach to the end of the boom (where the preventer lines will operate most efficiently) with a small piece of line that I double loop and thread around the end of boom. My topping lift line will prevent it from slipping off aft end of boom and the clew of the mainsail prevents the line from going forward. I also like these basic preventer rigs because you can take them down and get them out of the way in no time.

TejasSailer 02-02-2013 02:35 PM

Re: Installing a Boom Brake
 
Our boat is end-boom sheeted, and for the mid-boom attachment of the boon-brake, we were concerned that the spar might break at the attachment point. To mitigate that possibility I through bolted stainless steel strips on each side of the boom to distribute the load and mounted the bridle in the center.

casey1999 02-05-2013 01:13 PM

Re: Installing a Boom Brake
 
Thanks for all the comments- a lot to think about.
Regards


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