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  #1  
Old 05-13-2013
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Question Preventing condensation in cupboards

I know there are a few threads on this but they are not getting to my specifics so sorry about the revisit.

We have a solid-hulled Bristol 38.8 that we sail in Maine and may take further north. Without insulation it is not an ideal northern boat but it is manageable except for the condensation in the cupboards. We really need to get that under control as it soaks everything we store.

I was thinking the best solution would be to line them with a self adhesive insulating layer but I'm not sure what to try.

1. Self adhesive duct insulation like Armaflex would be ideal but it is very very soft and will not last long as a top surface. I REALLY don't want to have to laminate.....

2. Vinyl tiles might work and they would be easy to install but I'm not sure they would be thick enough to prevent condensation and the VOC's are an issue.

3. Carpet is - I assume - a non-starter.

4. Maybe cork tiles - VOC's again?

5. Use Dri-Deck to at least separate the condensation from the stuff (I don't like this one much....)

Any experience, observations or other ideas out there?

This is an in-use problem not a layup problem by the way, and we have tried to address source minimization by re-bedding all the deck fittings, using a 'dripless' packing and having an externally ducted heater

Thanks a lot

Graham
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Old 05-13-2013
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Re: Preventing condensation in cupboards

I am kind of surprised the cupboards are so well sealed that only they would have condensation issues ?
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Re: Preventing condensation in cupboards

No, they are not the only area and they are well ventilated but the coach roof is cored and is easily wipe-able, although, IF I find a good solution, I might do that as well.

The only areas of the solid hull that are not wood lined are all in the cupboards so that is where the problem manifests and is least manageable.

Graham

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I am kind of surprised the cupboards are so well sealed that only they would have condensation issues ?
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Old 05-13-2013
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Re: Preventing condensation in cupboards

I know lots of northern latitude folks swear by Refletex or some such insulation. I it is like bubble wrap, but also has reflective aluminum coating. I think there a couple of brands, but if you look for silver bubble wrap I am sure any brand will do. It uses both insulation space (bubbles) and a reflective surface to fight heat loss. Air movement is also critical so solar vent fans are good.
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Re: Preventing condensation in cupboards

I don't know why they like reflectix so much. A proper closed cell foam is a much better solution, for both heat, sound and longevity. Unless it's the space ship aesthetic you're going for.
There is, if you have the money a type of Volara that comes pre-bonded to HDPE hard plastic as the skin.
In my case, I used stick on drawer liner instead over top of the foam, that way if it gets ugly, I can easily change it, in the meantime it provides a fairly durable and easily wipeable surface.
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Re: Preventing condensation in cupboards

Gymnastic Rubber - Rubber flooring, closed cell foam exercise mat

Maybe this would work?
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Re: Preventing condensation in cupboards

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Gym Rubber is a high density closed-cell foam with a medium feel. Its durability and flexibility makes it great for exercise matting, kneeling cushions, and camping pads, all while remaining comfortably soft to the touch. It can help dampen vibrations and noise in automotive and industrial applications as well. Gym Rubber features a high R-Value, allowing it to be used as insulation. Very easy to cut, it is also moisture resistant and practical for outdoor, boating, and marine applications. Its technical name is Polyvinyl Chloride Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (PVC/NBR).
Actually sounds really good for this aplication.
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Old 05-13-2013
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Re: Preventing condensation in cupboards

What about neoprene?
Foam Insulation, Neoprene, Closed-Cell Foam - Foam Sheets
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Old 05-14-2013
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Re: Preventing condensation in cupboards

This is using a big hammer perhaps to hit a small nail; however, we sail the same areas and put an Espar heater in the boat. We had the duct work run through cabinets on the way to outlets. The residual heat from the duct work does a fine job of keeping cabinet internals dry.

Bonus is you have a warm boat for passengers too.

Minus is, lots more money and installation complexity than insulation.
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Old 05-14-2013
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Re: Preventing condensation in cupboards

Quote:
Originally Posted by benesailor View Post
Actually sounds really good for this aplication.

IMHO, beware polyvinly chloride. Smells really bad.

Regards,
Brad
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