Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26 - SailNet Community

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Old 05-24-2013
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Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26

Hi all,
I just bought my new sailboat, a Pearson 26. It is robust and in great shape (deck, hull, bulkhead, chain plates, etc...) but needs to be refreshed and I'm seeking some advice. It hasn't been sailed since 2008 and was stored outside. The hatch boards and their frame delaminate and are falling apart : while I feel making new ones is not beyond my crafting abilities (I found some cool explanations on websites like this one : (butlerprojects dot com/articles/hatchboards), I have no cue of what wood I should use. Does anyone have suggestions and/or experience ? Should it be plain teak, plywood, a mix of both, lumber ? Would a trip top Home Depot be enough ? I would like the new parts to have a pretty wooden look but be water/sun resistant at the end.
The bottom paint is also flaking and while the guys on the yard suggest to just scrape a little and re-apply a layer of ablative anti-fouling paint, I would like the bottom to look smooth and not bumpy of all the previous layers/holes of old paint. Do I have to go to the extend of stripping the whole bottom or is there an in-between compromise ? Also, does anyone know what's below the ablative paint on a Pearson 26 ? Where the paint is removed, I don't see a uniform, smooth layer of gelcoat but more like a textured body that looks like fiber glass ; is this expected ?
Last. the keel bolts are rusted from what I see from the cabin floor ; however the keel-hull join is only slightly cracked on one side, an perfect on the other side of the keel, and there is just a single little smear (5 mm wide) of rust that made its way out from the top of the keel down along the keel body. Pardon the poor description but is it enough to advice in favor of leaving the bolts the way they are, or changing them ? I read about (Dan Pfeifer, and other websites) changing keel bolts one by one, and that sounds like it does not require to move the boat from the stands or realign the keel - actually, it sounds almost too simple - does anyone have experience with changing bolts this way ?
Thank you much for any input/suggestion !
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Re: Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26

You won't find suitable materials at Home Depot. Teak is traditional but hard to find and expensive. Other woods generally don't stand up as well, but there are some that are not bad - mahogany, iroko come to mind.

For the drop boards there are other options like acrylic or Starboard or equivalent. Acrylic has the added advantage of letting in light, along with the reduced maintenance over any sort of wood. Starboard is becoming available in other colours now too. It is easy to work with, responds well to routers and the like, and can even take a screw. There is a company now that offers replacement handrails and other components in a 'teaky coloured' Starboard.. not quite the same but does the job.

Flaking bottom paint is usually the result of too many layers built up over time. Scraping, vacuum sanding and soda blasting are the main methods used here, with the latter being much less work but more costly. Some have had success with a product called 'peel away' which has the advantage of containing the old paint, yard rules today require that you capture all that crap somehow...

Pearson's use of a through bolted keel flange over the more usual cast-in bolts makes the 'one bolt at a time' a good option for you..but it's still a bit of work. You've already found the 'how to' on that!
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Old 05-25-2013
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Re: Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26

We have a 1975 P26 that was/is in pretty rough shape. I'd suggest replacing the keel bolts just as you described, we did as well. Our keel sounds like it's in the same shape as your, for the past three seasons we scrapped of the peeling paint and put on a fresh coat of anti-fouling paint. It's an iron keel so I'm afraid of more corrosion, so next season we plan to sand it down as mach as we can then paint it with Watergard 300. It's a thick epoxy paint that will act as a barrier coat and you only have to use one or two coats. Then we'll put on a fresh coat of anti-fouling.

We made a new cabin door from mahogany and urethaned it. It's held up very well for three years now.

One thing I'd suggest on the P26 is that you check the wiring in as many places as you can get to it. Our was badly corroded so we replaced all of it and added a system to charge the batteries off the outboard.

If you have any other specific questions, let us know as we probably have either tried to fix it successfully or failed and learned a lesson....
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Old 05-29-2013
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Re: Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26

Thank you very much Faster and FoggyBottom !
I've looked in lumber stores around for mahogany plywood or teak boards and had no luck ; I'd rather the door be of wood than Starboard but I'll keep the latter in mind as a convenient backup ! A carpenter friend volunteered to get these boards for me from his supplier, finally, which should help. Silicone sealing on the edges and polyurethane, for the plywood, should do the job... (?).
I started testing AquaStrip Marine from Back To Nature (my WestMarine store didn't have Peel Away and aquastrip was cheaper, so I went for it for the first round) on a square of hull. In 2 hours it just removed the first layer (of 5?) of bottom paint, at 65 degrees. I'll try for 24h tonight as Practical Sailor had it tested for this duration and they managed to remove 85% of the paint.
Two pros of neighboring boat yards/manufacturers looked at the keel bolts and said they're fine and not worth the pain - so for now I'll set my OCD aside and trust them.
The electrical wiring will need to be redone indeed and I was thinking of using solar panels to charge the battery - I motor very little when sailing and I like the idea of the battery charging when I'm not on board. The only use for the battery will be the electronics, I have nothing fancy like fridge or music,... I haven't looked too much yet in the power requirements of chart finders, depth sounders and radio but I'd imagine they don't use so much ? Electricity will be the fun part, after the bottom has been stripped and repainted !
Thanks again for the guidance and infos !
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Original Roller Furler on 1977 Pearson 26

The original roller furler that came with my Pearson 26 looks old but nothing like it can't be fixed or part replaced. However I can't find the make of the system (labels have peels off and I don't see anything like it on the web). It looks very sturdy with an aluminium drum and foil (the foil is a grooved tube of 1 in in diameter that replaces the headstay) ; there's a ball bearing in the swivel, not the drum, and the swivel base can rotate when the top is fixed (I read it's good for the sail shape ?). I posted a few pictures to see if anyone recognize this type of furler ? (the owner manual of the P26 gives details but no brand about it). Would there be any safety/reliability issue in rescuing this oldie instead of ordering a new one like a CDI ? Thank you for your help !
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Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26-drum.jpg   Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26-swivel.jpg   Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26-swivel-2.jpg   Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26-top-terminal.jpg  
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Old 05-30-2013
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Re: Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26

IPE is another wood that is very good in marine conditions. As far as the Acrylic I would suggest going with a smoked polycarbonate. It is a little more expensive but a better product in exposed UV conditions. Polycarbonate and Acrylic both require special consideration when fabricating. Tooling must be very sharp and appropriate for the material or you will get rough edges and or kickback on your machinery. I am a cnc programer and use autocad to make all of my parts with access to the cnc machinery and Tungsten carbide bits it is a breeze. In the garage however it can be painstaking and easy to screw up some very expensive material. It may be easier for you to make some very accurate templates of what you want and send it to a fabricator to make the hatch boards if you go with acrylic or polycarbonate. I work with that stuff all the time so feel free to ask any questions you may have on it.
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Old 05-30-2013
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Re: Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26

I second the recommendation of smoked acrylic companionway dropboards. They came with my Pearson 28. They are strong, long-lasting, and add light to the cabin.
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Re: Original Roller Furler on 1977 Pearson 26

mainer 24, you have a Stream Stay furler. The parts are still available on the internet.
Mine was just freed up after non use for 10 years. It tooka lit of patience.
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Re: Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26

Thank you ! Great help for the furler, you're right, there's a lot of info and parts on the web! Still looking for smoked acrylamide thick enough (3/4 in I guess) for a companionway door but the bottom of the hull is almost completely stripped. I really appreciate your help, all.
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Re: Wood work, bottom paint, keel bolts on Pearson 26

Quote:
Originally Posted by mainer24 View Post
Thank you ! Great help for the furler, you're right, there's a lot of info and parts on the web! Still looking for smoked acrylamide thick enough (3/4 in I guess) for a companionway door but the bottom of the hull is almost completely stripped. I really appreciate your help, all.
Whoa.....3/4 acrylic will be WAAAAY to thick and too heavy to easily handle even if the doors are in several parts.. Not to mention hard to find and expensive.

1/2 inch will be plenty.. if your current dropboards are 3/4 and that's the gap in the slides you'll have to modify either the edges of the boards (glue another strip on) or somehow reduce the gap in the slides by gluing a strip of wood in there or add some weatherstripping etc... But don't go heavier than 1/2 inch for the dropboards themselves...
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