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cthoops 06-27-2013 07:13 AM

Trying to be prepared for the inevitable hurricane
 
This is our first year owning a sailboat and we're trying to be proactive when it comes to being prepared for the first threatened hurricane of the season. We figured it's a matter of when, not if, and we'd rather not be scrambling at the last minute.

We're on a mooring ball at a marina and from what I've read in old threads, we should have an extra line (or even two) of varying lengths to add to the existing line. My question is, how would we attach those lines? The ball has a swiveling shackle at the top. Would we just attach another shackle to the existing one? Also, our boat only has one bow cleat so I'm not sure where we would attach the other lines.

I know we should also have anti-chafing on the lines, but any other general advice would be appreciated.

Thanks.

Minnewaska 06-27-2013 07:42 AM

Re: Trying to be prepared for the inevitable hurricane
 
If you're staying on the mooring, you are on the right track. Redundant lines and serious chafe protection are a must. One technique is to remove your anchor or anything that could cause chafe. One redundant line should not be under load with the others, as they may all fail at once, if they are all chafing together.

Unfortunately, there is nothing you can do about the single point of failure below the mooring ball, including its' anchoring system, which may not be sufficient to hold a boat in that kind of weather.

Best is to get on a hurricane haulout list at a nearby marina. Often, you must be on the list early, as late comers are at the end of the line. Most insurance companies will offer coverage to either pay for the haul or split the cost with you. Although, I believe it is usually an add-on to hull coverage, since they really want to avoid that liability.

BarryL 06-27-2013 10:25 AM

Re: Trying to be prepared for the inevitable hurricane
 
Hey,

Unfortunately I'm getting good at Hurricane prep.

1. Reduce windage: remove headsail, mainsail, dodgers, bimini's etc.
2. Extra line from mooring ball to boat. I tie a line right onto the shackle. I leave the line a little loose so that my regular mooring pendants are taking the strain. The line is a backup. If you only have one cleat I would run the line back and tie to the mast.
3. Chafe protection on everything - where the pendants go through the chocks. Where the pendants are on the cleats, etc.
4. Make sure your batteries are charged and your bilge clean and empty.
5. Close all through hulls
6. Make sure your insurance is paid up
7. HOPE

My boat has made it though Irene, Sandy and a bunch of of nor'easters. I have an oversize mooring ball and the pendants are kept in good condition. My boat was damaged during Sandy because other boats dragged and hit me. Fortunately it wasn't too bad and all the damage has been repaired (and then some, I'll post pics and the story soon).

Good luck,
Barry

downeast450 06-27-2013 12:27 PM

Re: Trying to be prepared for the inevitable hurricane
 
All of the above! If you are lucky there is a hurricane hole you can move to.

A comment on chafing gear. You can buy chafing sleeve by the foot at the marine store. It isn't cheap. I buy two sizes so I can put the first directly over the line and then insert line that is covered by the first sleeve into the second sleeve. Doubling the sleeve is very effective. I secure both sleeves by sewing them in place to the lines at their ends and make sure they generously overlap the areas where they might chafe. I prepare both sets of lines this way. I build and have the second hurricane "harness" ready to go complete with its hardware so installation on the mooring is a straightforward task. The second line is longer and larger than my regular mooring line.

This is for our Islander 28 which has a bridal that is attached to two deck cleats.

We have a 15' Marshall cat that sits on a mooring, too and doesn't always get hauled for severe weather. It has a single deck cleat and I double its lines in a similar way. In addition to the lines on the Marshall I hang a long piece of heavy chain from the bow eye to the swivel on the mooring. I have reinforced the bow eye to handle this. The chain is a fail safe but really acts as a damper to reduce the motion of this smaller boat.

Mother Nature is in charge!;)

Down

dvuyxx 06-27-2013 04:03 PM

Re: Trying to be prepared for the inevitable hurricane
 
I always come back to the question ... Is it better to be on my heavy mooring ball or to haul out? I always see hurricane photos of boats stacked on top of each other at marinas post hurricane.

Minnewaska 06-27-2013 06:41 PM

Re: Trying to be prepared for the inevitable hurricane
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by dvuyxx (Post 1050829)
I always come back to the question ... Is it better to be on my heavy mooring ball or to haul out? I always see hurricane photos of boats stacked on top of each other at marinas post hurricane.

You'll always get tons of anecdotal evidence of people that survived in either scenario, when the other didn't.

However, insurance companies are in the business of setting odds and trying to beat them. They all recommend going on the hard and often will help pay for it.

That doesn't mean that every single hard location is superior every hurricane hole mooring, but the odds are in that favor overall.

dvuyxx 06-27-2013 07:55 PM

Re: Trying to be prepared for the inevitable hurricane
 
There is just no way to measure. I'm 7 mi. up a river (Severn/Annapolis) on a cove protected by a natural jetty/point. It feels safe, but who knows.

mad_machine 06-27-2013 09:38 PM

Re: Trying to be prepared for the inevitable hurricane
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Minnewaska (Post 1050895)
.

However, insurance companies are in the business of setting odds and trying to beat them. They all recommend going on the hard and often will help pay for it.

I am in the market for new insurance. I was told by mine that they no longer cover anything beyond basic liability for any boat kept in a hurricane flood zone.

Minnewaska 06-27-2013 10:03 PM

Re: Trying to be prepared for the inevitable hurricane
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by mad_machine (Post 1050980)
I am in the market for new insurance. I was told by mine that they no longer cover anything beyond basic liability for any boat kept in a hurricane flood zone.

Get an agent to shop for you. Your carrier may just want out.

Harborless 06-27-2013 10:28 PM

Re: Trying to be prepared for the inevitable hurricane
 
Well where are all the islanders and floridians on this?

One, save the money on chafing gear and use garden hose to insulate lines. Much cheaper.
two, apply four by twos or even six or eight by twos over each two fenders. This protects the entire side of your boat without having to have tons of fenders. Just make sure you secure the top of the board with lines to the toe rail and swim under your boat and tie the bottom line to the other side of the boats toe rails to avoid wind blowing them away.
three, if your in florida south of st augastine find a mangrove and even better a creek with mangroves. Tie lines in spiderweb formation to trees, mangrove roots, and throw out as many anchors and rode as you have. Avoid mooring fields and crowded anchorages and marinas or beware.
four, dont just remove the sails, remove the boom, strip your boat down.
five, duck take your portholes. Mineral spirits will remove any sticky residue after the storm leaves.
six, try to find creeks or channels as far inland and as little crowded as possible.
seven, if its a category four or five expect damage. Remove boat valuables and important documents before storms arrival.
lastly pray or hope, depending on your beliefs.


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