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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #11  
Old 07-07-2013
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Re: Slip or Mooring Can?

I wish moorings were availible here. Going from a 14 foot trailer sailer to a 23 foot full keel has my wallet puckering and me in sticker shock for slip prices in and around Atlantic City.

Cheapest seems to be about 100/week. Most exensive.. 1000/week
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  #12  
Old 07-07-2013
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Re: Slip or Mooring Can?

For me, being on a mooring can was a pain. We started by getting to it rowing out on a dinghy. When winds occasionally made that method impossible, we began taking the tender. Then we'd have to motor over to a seawall to pick up passengers, supplies, parts, etc. When it comes to working on the boat, you'd better have every part, material and tool on hand or work stops cold.

When we moved to the slip, we found we used the boat much more, were more likely to do regular maintenance, stay on board overnight and just enjoy the boat more. And we met a lot of people on the docks and made friends along the way. IMHO, a slip is the only way to go.
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Old 07-07-2013
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Re: Slip or Mooring Can?

Having read all the posts from the experienced Sail-netters it appears the consensus is to "take the slip." The most compelling reasoning being that a "new boat" will require countless trips on and off for minor projects, provisioning, equipping and the like. It is expected that the newly purchased boat will not meet all of your needs..... and you have no dinghy. Take the slip unless the lease term is prohibitive.
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Old 07-07-2013
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Re: Slip or Mooring Can?

One cheapskates perspective...

I like keeping our boat on it's mooring. I also really like being able to pull into a slip to do commissioning, de-commissioning and repair work. Best of both worlds.

Comparing spending a night tied up at a dock to being on the mooring then the mooring offers more solitude but the dock offers shore side power, heads and showers etc.

Moorings are often 1/3 or less the cost of a slip.
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Old 07-07-2013
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Re: Slip or Mooring Can?

New to sailing, you really need to be in a slip first. You need to learn to handle your boat in every possible condition under power, docking bow first and stern first. Also the security of plugging in to shore power should there be any problems requiring electricity (lights, pumps) or even help, for someone unfamiliar with shipboard equipment is really invaluable.
As time progresses you can cut your umbilical and spend week ends on your anchor or mooring until you are comfortable that the boat can survive w/o shore power and then you can move to a permanent mooring.
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Old 07-07-2013
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Re: Slip or Mooring Can?

I guess I'm the odd one out. We reluctantly took a mooring last August after buying our first boat, because we couldn't get a slip that late in the season anywhere nearby. I thought we HAD to have a slip, but had no other options. By October, we put down a deposit to take the same mooring this year. We slept on the boat nearly every weekend and can't imagine not having the privacy of a mooring. The dinghy in and out is really not a big deal -- just get a good stable one.
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Re: Slip or Mooring Can?

We're also the odd ones out. This is our first year owning a boat and we're on a mooring. For us, the cost difference made it a no-brainer. We've done a few projects and yes, we've had to stop, get in the dinghy, and head back to the store, but it's no big deal to us. We enjoy the privacy of the mooring and have no regrets.

That being said, we have a decent-size dinghy with an outboard. Rowing back and forth would have gotten old really fast.
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Old 07-07-2013
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Re: Slip or Mooring Can?

Our modus operandi is to try and get out to boat Friday evening the head back Monday morning, if that fails then Saturday morning to Sunday evening.

Under either of those two scenarios I'd much prefer being on mooring if only for the peace and quiet plus ventilation. I guess though we are pretty damn lucky in that our mooring is quite close to shore in a fairly well protected field. There is never an instance where we'd need a motor to get in and/or out. If the weather is ordinary we will often spend entire weekend on the mooring. We also have access to two public wharves for picking up and dropping off plus we have our club's pontoon available.

Otoh ... when staying on board for extended periods or if we still needed to get dressd and head off to work then marina. No doubt whatsoever.
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Old 07-08-2013
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Re: Slip or Mooring Can?

It can be extremely intimidating to handle a boat within a marina if boating a new pastime for you. Costly too, if you hit another boat or a dock. Sailing(motoring) from and to a ball is easier to master. It also allows you to learn how the boat handles in less stressful environment. It is much quieter on a ball and ventilation is always there since the boat always vanes into wind. There is no straight answer for the question. I guess moorings are for introverts and marinas are for extroverts
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Old 07-08-2013
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Re: Slip or Mooring Can?

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyRu View Post
I guess moorings are for introverts and marinas are for extroverts
I think that's a good observation. I don't know why anyone would want to be sandwiched together with other boats and have people walking by within feet of where you relax and sleep. But, then, I score pretty highly toward the introvert side.
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