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  #21  
Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Galley countertop refinishing

I've done a LOT of this mica work, professionally and for my own houses. The slate texture as Mark described is what I have in my house. I've had both white and dark. They are my favorite patterns. It is easy to keep clean, does not show minor scratches, and lasts forever.

I would definitely not try to take the nosing off. It is likely brittle and very likely to be destroyed in the process. If you can rent/buy/borrow an undercut saw, you can make a "slot" for new mica around the entire perimeter. If not, you can probably make a small undercut with just a hand saw laid flat. You just need enough to cover the edge of new mica. The key to it is in getting an exact pattern of the shape to cut. Mark it on the back side (careful not to do it backward) of the mica and cut with a fine blade circular saw.

You should probably piece it, make the seam at the back of what appears to be the stove. It'll make the job easier not having to handle a big piece of mica. Of course, make the sink/hatch cutouts after it's glued down with a laminate trimmer bit in your router. The sink, faucet and that hatch and trim will need to come out. With a few hours work and a few bucks, you can have a permanent fix.
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  #22  
Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Galley countertop refinishing

I won't quote all the above posting but
" If you can rent/buy/borrow an undercut saw, you can make a "slot" for new mica around the entire perimeter. If not, you can probably make a small undercut with just a hand saw laid flat. You just need enough to cover the edge of new mica. "

I think I see a couple of problems with this approach. How to cut the slot in the corners using a hand saw, how to slip the mica into the slot when the mice is surrounded by three sides. Mica won't do compound curves. Inadvertently making contact with the contact cement before final placement.
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  #23  
Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Galley countertop refinishing

Had thé same issue Covered old Formica with new White
A 4x8 sheet is $30.00 +$20.00 for cement glue
A good carpet knife and a router for finishing the edges
Looks good !
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  #24  
Old 07-30-2013
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Another vote for going right over the top of the old laminate. I have done it several times (not on a boat). Just remember once you get contact cement on it, dont let them touch until you are ready. Once they do, they are not coming apart, so make SURE it is positioned just as you want it. Use blue masking tape to cover the lines you cut to prevent spalling, then as has been said earlier a router to finish it at the final edges. I am going to be doing this same thing this winter when I have her on the hard.
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  #25  
Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Galley countertop refinishing

we never took the fiddles off in my galley.

Make a template first.
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  #26  
Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Galley countertop refinishing

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimgo View Post
We have deep blue, Formica countertops in the galley. The galley is at the foot of the stairs/ladder to the cabin, and it's the first thing you see when you look into the boat. I think painting/refinishing the countertops would go a long way toward freshening the look of the boat. Is there an inexpensive (less than $50) solution for painting countertops that will handle being in a marine environment? I'm not usually a stickler for "marine" stuff, but I really don't want the countertop paint to be flaking off at the beginning of next season.

Another option I've considered is to find some thin granite or tile and glue that down, but then you get into grout lines, etc., and it just doesn't seem like a good idea. Solid granite countertops would be WAY out of my budget, and might impact the balance of the boat. So, that's why I keep coming back to the paint idea.

As usual, any suggestions are appreciated!
Hey Jim,

I actually like the tile look. You could put them in with "zero" grout lines, they are easy to install, and are cheap. They even make those marble looking ones that are not that bad but a tad heavy. You can finish them out with either a teak round over or even oak if you wanted (when finished right looks close to teak). I saw a Mason 54 that did this and I thought it looked good.

Catalina uses a powder coating on top of fiberglass to look like Corian. To the casual eye, it may seem like Corian but is not. THat would be a lighter weight option but more work.

I personally would not paint it. Unless an old class Herschoff design, I am not a fan of things painted inside boats... but that is just my opinion.

Good luck with it! Take us some before and after pics!!

Brian
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  #27  
Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Galley countertop refinishing

I just relaminated mine this year. I pulled all the trim off and used a router with a cut off bit after glueing. Looks like the factory did it. I also took a belt sander to the old top to get good adhesion. Easy and was about 50 bucks
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Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Galley countertop refinishing

I don't mind the blue formica. I'd live with it and concentrate on more important systems that are not purely aesthetic.
But it is your boat and you can do what you like...
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  #29  
Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Galley countertop refinishing

I think white formica is the way to go ... classic ... and cannot really get that dated like a marble pattern or a particular color. Looks sharp agains the wood trim too.
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  #30  
Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Galley countertop refinishing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Captainmeme View Post
I won't quote all the above posting but
" If you can rent/buy/borrow an undercut saw, you can make a "slot" for new mica around the entire perimeter. If not, you can probably make a small undercut with just a hand saw laid flat. You just need enough to cover the edge of new mica. "

I think I see a couple of problems with this approach. How to cut the slot in the corners using a hand saw, how to slip the mica into the slot when the mice is surrounded by three sides. Mica won't do compound curves. Inadvertently making contact with the contact cement before final placement.
Doing it that way would certainly be tight but I think as long as it's just a little way under the wood, it could be shoe-horned in. You'd have to be really careful to not crack the inside corner. I would do a dry fit that went in easily before the final glue-up. If it became apparent it wouldn't go in, one side could always be left shorter and just butted with a little 1/4" 1/4 r. put on later.

The undercut could be done with a little Japanese cut-off saw whose nose could be swiped into the corner. A good sharp regular hand saw, laid flat would probably work for the majority of it. 1/16" would be all that's needed to make a nice seal around the edges later with some caulking. One thing I didn't mention is that as long as the sink is out, to seal all the edges if not already sealed.

The dowel method I described above works really well to assure it only grabs where you want. Waiting for the contact cement to dry completely and beating the heck out of it afterward with a block of wood and hammer is important. OF COURSE MAKE SURE ALL SOURCES OF IGNITION ARE OFF WHEN WORKING WITH CONTACT CEMENT. The non-flammable stuff is not as good.

The best way to construct mica tops for boats is to laminate both sides, using a cheap, plain mica on the bottom. I've done this on boats where it looks as good today as it looked 30 years ago. Keeping moisture out is absolutely essential, especially if the core is particle board.
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