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Old 07-30-2013
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Questions and Advice for that first BIG sail in a new(OLD) boat

A few months ago my husband and I bought a 1972 Ericson 35MkII. We got her for a steal and she needs some work, but all in all we are thrilled with what we got. My husband has been doing some work to her to get her ready to sail home. We are sailing her 140NM from New Port Richey, Fl to Carrabelle, Fl in just under 3 weeks. I have a couple of questions and a lot of concerns. Any advice or things I need to watch out for would be GREATLY appreciated.

We are planning on replacing all of our running rigging before then (our standing rigging is SOLID.) However, I cannot seem to find out what lengths of rope I am going to need ANYWHERE. I posted that question on the Ericson specific site forum, so hopefully those guys have an answer to that.
We have decent sailing experience and our going to have one or two VERY experienced crew members. Also, a friend of ours is making the same sail, the same weekend in his freshly renovated boat (re-did practically EVERYTHING). We are sailing up at the same time to both be able to help each other out if need be.

Our diesel is out of commission but our sails are in great shape. We have arranged a tow both out of NPR and into the marina at Carrabelle. I was just hoping for some solid advice and Im REALLY looking for a list of things I should check before setting off. Anyone have a link to a good checklist??

THANKS!
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Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Questions and Advice for that first BIG sail in a new(OLD) boat

Well, you have an escort and tugs, otherwise I'd have suggested you bring along a dinghy with an outboard to lash alongside for power in a flat calm.

If you have your nav gear and your ground tackle is okay, then it's just the safety gear (fire extinguishers, flares, lifejackets, whistle, etc) and registration or documentation. Got a deviation card for the magnetic compass? Radio? provisions and working stove? Pots, pans, dishes? Charts or echarts? spare bilge pumps? A couple of pine plugs just in case for the through-hulls and hoses? spare flashlights? Radar reflector?

You harbor-hopping, or sailing straight through?

There's more I havent thought of, but that's a stab. Years ago I used to deliver boats, often on short notice so we frequently found we were missing something and had to improvise. It was fun.

Jibsheets, usually the length of the boat. Mainsheet, push the boom all the way out, measure and do the back-and-forth math, leaving yoursef an extra 10 feet or so extra
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Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Questions and Advice for that first BIG sail in a new(OLD) boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by nolatom View Post
Well, you have an escort and tugs, otherwise I'd have suggested you bring along a dinghy with an outboard to lash alongside for power in a flat calm.

If you have your nav gear and your ground tackle is okay, then it's just the safety gear (fire extinguishers, flares, lifejackets, whistle, etc) and registration or documentation. Got a deviation card for the magnetic compass? Radio? provisions and working stove? Pots, pans, dishes? Charts or echarts? spare bilge pumps? A couple of pine plugs just in case for the through-hulls and hoses? spare flashlights? Radar reflector?

You harbor-hopping, or sailing straight through?

There's more I havent thought of, but that's a stab. Years ago I used to deliver boats, often on short notice so we frequently found we were missing something and had to improvise. It was fun.

Jibsheets, usually the length of the boat. Mainsheet, push the boom all the way out, measure and do the back-and-forth math, leaving yoursef an extra 10 feet or so extra
That sums it up. I'm constantly doing short notice, broken or no engine delivery's. I'm doing one from Marco Island to the Key's tomorrow night. Always throwing together quick trip kits. Every boat has a different story to tell, and you'll never be "READY", but throw the essentials on there and go. Engineless sailing is more about weather window. Wind direction and strength. I'm waiting till tomorrow night to do my run because the wind will be prefect to knock out the trip. Check weatherpassage.com and see what the wind flags have to say about the time you'll be out there. I've done trips that have taken two weeks that should have been three day's and vice versa. Just think safety first and be prepared for un-expected emergency's. Expect the worst and hope for the best.
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Re: Questions and Advice for that first BIG sail in a new(OLD) boat

Don't take any chances with the weather in that area.

Without an engine to charge batteries, make sure your power needs are taken care of. Half of those hours you will need Nav lights, cabin lights, etc.. All of the hours will require Nav electronics, radios, to the extent that the boat is equipped.

If the boat has a big wind gen or solar array, never mind!


'
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Re: Questions and Advice for that first BIG sail in a new(OLD) boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by lowtide View Post
Don't take any chances with the weather in that area.

Without an engine to charge batteries, make sure your power needs are taken care of. Half of those hours you will need Nav lights, cabin lights, etc.. All of the hours will require Nav electronics, radios, to the extent that the boat is equipped.

If the boat has a big wind gen or solar array, never mind!


'
That's very true about electric charge. On my own boat, which has no engine and only a small flexi solar mat for charging my two battery's. I deal with this by only having two things that run on house bank. My mast head running light and my vhf. every thing else is portable and my vhf has a hand held back up. My cabin lights are those closet sticky things. I spent a week at sea in May and had no issues. At night I'm using headlamps that have a red mode to see any thing anyways. My gps is hand held. I actually had an issue on my last trip down the western Caribbean with my batt's but it didn't matter. I had a portable back up everything, then I found the problem and was back in bizzness, but for a whole night and half the next day I had no juice 150 miles off shore, but it really did'nt matter.
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Re: Questions and Advice for that first BIG sail in a new(OLD) boat

I would make certain the engine runs well. Take several RACOR filters and a strap wrench to change them! Know how to bleed the engine. If the boat has been sitting any length of time you're bound to stir up some gunk in the bottom of the tank.

Last year I brought my new to me boat down from RI. 400 miles (in 65 hours!) and we launched the boat the day before we left! Talk about sweating bullets... Only trouble we had was the third day b/c the Racor was clogged and I didn't have a wrench! We dealt w/ it though. Make sure you have charts of the entire area and have a "bailout" plan; where will you go if such and such happens? Handheld GPS. Keep an hourly log of postion/heading/speed. Keep a running plot on your chart. When I did my delivery I stayed pretty much w/in sight of land or just barely out of sight. I could have saved a few miles by going straight to DE BAY but I wanted to ensure I had VHF coverage if something went wrong.

Check your seacocks and hoses! Oh and make sure your Insurance covers you for the area you are sailing.
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Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Questions and Advice for that first BIG sail in a new(OLD) boat

Some "back of the envelope" calculations for your running rigging. Others can double-check me, please. If your lines are run to the mast, halyards need to be at least twice the height of the mast; you're better off adding a few more feet to play it safe. If you're running back to the cockpit, you need twice the height of the mast plus the distance from the mast to the cockpit (if you aren't sure, assume at least 10 feet) plus 3-5' so you'll have some room at the end. If your halyards run through blocks on their way back to the cockpit, add another 3-4'.

So, let's assume you have a typical set-up and that this is your boat. That means that the main halyard runs down the mast, around a block, and back to a clutch before it hits a winch on the cabin top. If I am reading the stats on Sailboat Listings correctly, your mast is 43' high. So mast height x2 = 86'. Not sure if your halyards run inside our outside, let's add on another foot just in case they cross the mast head, so now we're at 87. Let's add 15' to get back to the cabin, plus another 5' to be able to go around that block. So, now we're at 107'. Tack on another 10' to be able to wrap around the winch a few times and still have enough to grab and you're at 127'. I'd probably go to 130-135' just to play it safe.

The jib halyard will need slightly different math. It needs to be the height of the mast, plus the length of the forestay, plus the other numbers we used above if it runs back to the cockpit. Your forestay looks to be somewhere in the 55' length (actually, it looks like it's about 52', but I'm rounding for safety). Add in the 43' for the mast get you to 98'. Then 15' to the cabin, 5' for the offset to the block, plus 10 for the winch is 128. I'd probably order 140' to play it safe.

Jib sheet length will depend on where your winches and clutches are, but they need to be at least the length of the boat plus 10' to go around the winches, plus some line to get around the cleat. In most cases, though, they will probably need to be longer.

Your mainsheet and vang line are another story. They will depend on where everything is positioned on the boat.

Another way to figure out the rigging length, if you're close to the boat, is to buy a few spools of 100' of poly clothesline from Home Depot or another such store and run it as a messenger, remembering that it will likely be much shorter than your current line. But if you stay at the mast, you can tie the messenger off at the mast and measure your current running rigging, then use the messenger to replace it.
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Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Questions and Advice for that first BIG sail in a new(OLD) boat

Hey,

Well, you're a lot braver than me.

I took new to me boats on delivery trips home - one 35 nm and the other about 85 nm. However, both boats had reliable diesel engines (and both came in real handy). As mentioned, a dink with small OB would be good enough to move you in an emergency.

I would bring an EBIRB/PLB/SPOT device. I would also but unlimited towing insurance from Boat US.

Barry
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Old 07-30-2013
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Re: Questions and Advice for that first BIG sail in a new(OLD) boat

What about your bottom?

If dirty either scrub it yourself or get a diver to do it.
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Old 07-31-2013
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Re: Questions and Advice for that first BIG sail in a new(OLD) boat

Hey Jim,

Great information regarding lenght of rigging. Don't need it now, but will use it at a later time down the line. This is why I love this site; everyone has something to add... except me. Perhaps in a few years' time...

Mike
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