Lesson learned about reading weather... - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree8Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 08-05-2013
blutoyz's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 640
Thanks: 10
Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 3
blutoyz is on a distinguished road
Lesson learned about reading weather...

Saw this yesterday...


And like a dummy left full cloth up. Luckily I was able to dump the gust from the squall quick enough, let the boat turn down-wind and get the headsail in. Scared the crap out of the Admiral and popped a lifeline but other than that no harm no foul I guess.

I will have the sense to bring in the jib at least when I see someting close again. I should have known better
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 08-05-2013
BarryL's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,671
Thanks: 3
Thanked 32 Times in 29 Posts
Rep Power: 12
BarryL is on a distinguished road
Re: Lesson learned about reading weather...

Hey,

That's a mistake I made ONCE. I'll never forget the time we went sailing in similar conditions. My wife kept saying "Isn't that a storm? Shouldn't we go home or something?" And I just said "No, we're fine." Right up until I saw a WALL of rain approaching. It came some quickly like it was from a movie. I just had time to say "Oh Sh*t, get the kids below." and then it hit. High winds, torrential rain. My wife steered while I furled the headsail and then we rode it out. Fortunately it only lasted a few minutes but boy was it scary. Of course right after the squall passed we had a rainbow and blue sky.

Now, when I see skies like that I put the headsail away THEN decide what to do.

Barry
emcentar, jimgo and blutoyz like this.
__________________
Barry Lenoble
Deep Blue C, 2002 C&C 110
Mt. Sinai, NY

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 08-05-2013
jimgo's Avatar
Asleep at the wheel
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 3,012
Thanks: 71
Thanked 116 Times in 114 Posts
Rep Power: 4
jimgo is on a distinguished road
Re: Lesson learned about reading weather...

And she stayed married to you Barry? That's impressive.

Blu, glad that's all this "teachable moment" cost you.
__________________
- Jim
Home: Western Philly 'burbs
1980 Allmand 31
1975 Albacore 15


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 08-05-2013
capta's Avatar
Master Mariner
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: somewhere in the Windward or Leeward Islands
Posts: 1,744
Thanks: 17
Thanked 90 Times in 85 Posts
Rep Power: 4
capta is on a distinguished road
Re: Lesson learned about reading weather...

Rule of thumb;
If you can see under a squall, it'll not be too bad. If you can't a squall could have winds to 70 knots or more in the leading edge, undetectable until they arrive, usually hidden by heavy rain.
You can see this difference even on a moonless night if you try, with an unobstructed view of the squall.
If in doubt, take down all your gear and wait it out. Don't try powering unless you are 100% positive that no lines will end up in your prop. Just lie a-hull and relax, they rarely last more than a half hour and then you can be on your merry again.
If the situation requires you to get underway again, then you can begin putting up sail suitable for the conditions after the leading edge has passed.
TJC45 likes this.
__________________
"Any idiot can make a boat go; it takes a sailor to stop one." Spike Africa aboard the schooner Wanderer in Sausalito, Ca. 1964.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 08-05-2013
blutoyz's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 640
Thanks: 10
Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 3
blutoyz is on a distinguished road
Re: Lesson learned about reading weather...

Quote:
Originally Posted by capta View Post
Rule of thumb;
If you can see under a squall, it'll not be too bad. If you can't a squall could have winds to 70 knots or more in the leading edge, undetectable until they arrive, usually hidden by heavy rain.
You can see this difference even on a moonless night if you try, with an unobstructed view of the squall.
If in doubt, take down all your gear and wait it out. Don't try powering unless you are 100% positive that no lines will end up in your prop. Just lie a-hull and relax, they rarely last more than a half hour and then you can be on your merry again.
If the situation requires you to get underway again, then you can begin putting up sail suitable for the conditions after the leading edge has passed.
I am guessing my puff was 30kn or so...more with that much sail out and I think my rig would have folded before I was able to dump the air out. My wife was shocked that it seemingly came out of nowhere so I told her about the "leading edge" you mentioned... I also admitted that I should have known better since I grew up out here.
Funny you mentioned lines in the prop...that is exactly why I had to wait to get back up into the wind, I wanted to have all sheets on deck.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 08-05-2013
azguy's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Scottsdale
Posts: 551
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 3
azguy is on a distinguished road
Re: Lesson learned about reading weather...

A wise man once told me: "When in doubt, prepare for the worst...."
blutoyz likes this.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 08-05-2013
BarryL's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,671
Thanks: 3
Thanked 32 Times in 29 Posts
Rep Power: 12
BarryL is on a distinguished road
Re: Lesson learned about reading weather...

Hey,

She's a good sport!

Just last week I hoisted her up the mast to the spreaders to do a little bit of work up there (remove old EZ Jack lines so I could get new ones made).

About the worst I have made her endure was the trip to Block Island, arriving just in time for a nor'easter, that kept us pinned down for 3 days with waves in the HARBOR that were so large we had to leave the boat and stay in a hotel.

Barry

Quote:
Originally Posted by jimgo View Post
And she stayed married to you Barry? That's impressive.

Blu, glad that's all this "teachable moment" cost you.
jimgo likes this.
__________________
Barry Lenoble
Deep Blue C, 2002 C&C 110
Mt. Sinai, NY

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 08-05-2013
DearPrudence's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: N. E. Ohio
Posts: 57
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 2
DearPrudence is on a distinguished road
Re: Lesson learned about reading weather...

In a situation like that, is it possible to heave to and ride it out? Or must the sails come down?
Jeff
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 08-05-2013
blutoyz's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 640
Thanks: 10
Thanked 11 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 3
blutoyz is on a distinguished road
Re: Lesson learned about reading weather...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DearPrudence View Post
In a situation like that, is it possible to heave to and ride it out? Or must the sails come down?
Jeff
With the wind I had and that much sail I fear the I would have shredded at least one of the sails if I hove to. I had only enough time to release the sheets to avoid a knock down.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 08-06-2013
capta's Avatar
Master Mariner
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: somewhere in the Windward or Leeward Islands
Posts: 1,744
Thanks: 17
Thanked 90 Times in 85 Posts
Rep Power: 4
capta is on a distinguished road
Re: Lesson learned about reading weather...

Quote:
Originally Posted by DearPrudence View Post
In a situation like that, is it possible to heave to and ride it out? Or must the sails come down?
Jeff
Jeff,
It would be my recommendation to drop all your gear until the leading edge has passed, then put up whatever you feel is appropriate. The strongest winds are usually in the leading edge, so if that has 50 knots of wind, it might settle down to 35 until it passes. Remember, most squalls are short lived; with a little patience they are gone.
I've found many squalls can have a calm before and after them. Perhaps that is where the term "calm before a storm" comes from?
TJC45 likes this.
__________________
"Any idiot can make a boat go; it takes a sailor to stop one." Spike Africa aboard the schooner Wanderer in Sausalito, Ca. 1964.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Help with reading a weather chart peterchech General Discussion (sailing related) 9 08-18-2012 12:53 PM
Lesson Learned: Mast caught in tree limbs DSnider748 Learning to Sail 7 11-13-2011 09:03 PM
Hard lesson learned about diesel fuel Northerneyes Diesel 11 07-20-2009 12:08 AM
Lesson learned drynoc Boat Review and Purchase Forum 6 04-21-2004 10:59 AM
Reading Weather Fax Charts Michael Carr Seamanship Articles 0 11-03-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:28 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.