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  #41  
Old 09-02-2013
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Re: A philosophical divide?

As I have said in other posts, if I don't do as much of the work on my boat as I possibly can, then I can't afford a boat of that size. So my choices are to do the work myself or downsize to a boat that I will not be happy long term cruising with. So I choose to do the work.

So I manufacture a lot of stuff for the boat myself, I do all the upgrades that I think we'll need and I keep the boat in reasonable and fully functional shape. Perfection is not a part of that process, if it look's good and works OK and it's unlikely to keep breaking then I'm satisfied.

And I do the work while I wait for the time to go cruising. When that time comes, only those jobs that are needed to keep us safe and comfortable will be on the agenda and when I have nothing better to do, I'll get into the non-essential work.

After all that, I am a person who loves making and fixing things and if I'm going to do it anyway, it may as well be the boat. It's like building a rocking horse for my grandson - I could go and buy one for a few dollars but when I see him riding the one I built, there is an irreplaceable sense of satisfaction.
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  #42  
Old 09-02-2013
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Re: A philosophical divide?

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Originally Posted by Omatako View Post
That's a contradiction in terms as far as I'm concerned. At least you didn't use the two statements in the same sentence.
Ah!... that's why I keep the boat as simple as possible. I can keep it in perfect running order because there aren't a lot of complicated systems to break down.
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  #43  
Old 09-02-2013
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Re: A philosophical divide?

Quote:
Originally Posted by tjvanginkel View Post
I think we can also make a choice, to enjoy, or not, the necessary maintenance.
Changing the oil or coolant in your engine is not really a "fun thing to do", however it is preferable to have a well running engine when you need it most, so you can either hate every second of the job or not. Your choice.
I choose to enjoy those jobs as much as possible because why waste my time hating what I am doing? And the end result of all of the "necessary maintenance" tasks is that you can take pride in a boat that works well and looks good. For me that increases my enjoyment of sailing the boat. So while I don't love the tedious jobs I enjoy the results very much! And therefore I am quite happy to do the work.
Although stinky head jobs are much harder to enjoy......I don't think my attitude will evolve that much!
That's a very healthy approach...

The amount of time spent on maintenance is highly dependent upon "choices" made far in advance, from boat selection to outfitting. As soon as one decides to varnish a teak toerail instead of letting it go silver, one has committed to a maintenance schedule... In choosing a more complex and failure-prone head, instead of one as dead simple as a Lavac, you've increased the likelihood you'll have to mess with it... In not bothering to make a cover for a windlass sitting on the foredeck, and leaving it completely exposed to the elements, you're eventually looking at potential 'issues' arising sooner, rather than later... And, in choosing to become dependent upon complex, high maintenance items with high failure rates such as generators and watermakers, you're likely setting yourself up for more aggravation over the long haul than might really be necessary...

The popular quip about cruising being largely about fixing your boat in exotic places certainly has a ring of truth, but many people bring so much of this stuff upon themselves in their inability to resist complexity in favor of simplicity, or reliance on gear they're unable to repair themselves... In my observation, one of the primary reasons many cruisers wind up giving up The Dream sooner, rather than later, is that they were simply not expecting the amount of effort and expense maintaining their boats to be as high as it turned out to be...
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  #44  
Old 09-02-2013
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Re: A philosophical divide?

I really enjoy working on projects ... But I'd still rather be sailing. I could care less about my car.
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  #45  
Old 09-02-2013
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Re: A philosophical divide?

Quote:
Originally Posted by smackdaddy View Post
^^^^This.

I don't enjoy maintenance - but I'll do it to maintain my enjoyment of sailing.

(See what I did there?)

Quote:
Originally Posted by scratchee View Post
I think it helps to keep things in perspective. For example, I enjoy working on my boat at least ten times more than mowing my lawn.
Some things I work on because the PO's delayed or failed to maintain certain things. Last Nov, when I winterized, I did an oil/filter change for the first time in 4yrs. At that point, I only had the boat for 8 mos and it was still on the trailer. I also had to replace a seacock/thru-hull because the wood backing got went and it came loose.

I certainly enjoy working on my boat more than yard/house work. Boat work doesn't feel like work. It feels like an achievement towards a goal. For some, it could be to complete a task while someone else could look at the goal of the next port.

Working on your own boat, you get the choice of what project to do and the quality of how it turns out, or at least how you hope it will turn out. If you decide one day, I'll wait and do it tomorrow, you can. While at a job, you do work because you have to and that just causes more stress in the long run.

I prefer to reduce stress whenever possible. It's not easy but every little bit helps.
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  #46  
Old 09-03-2013
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Re: A philosophical divide?

There are things I don't enjoy doing, but enjoy having done.

It's not quite that binary ...

Grinding off 12 years of old bottom paint, is something I certainly "can" do; it doesn't require vast skill, just perseverance. How about grinding off 12 years of old bottom paint while wearing full tyvek, in July, in the hazy, hot, humid Chesapeake? OTOH, I could sit at my desk, in my air-conditioned office, reading and commenting on documents, while earning the money to pay a guy to grind old bottom paint and support his family. As Seaduction said, its only work if you can think of something you'd rather be doing...
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  #47  
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Re: A philosophical divide?

I prefer to be sailing when I have the time and weather to allow it.

I like to maintain my boat, when I don't have one or the other. Winter is the best time for maintenance, but there are plenty of things that force mid-season care. I will also pay others to maintain the boat, if the task is either beyond my capabilities or would take too much time away from sailing. I keep the cockpit table and some cockpit trim varnished, but the rest goes grey. The balance works for me.

I find that maintaining the ship is the absolute best way to get to know her. You may be the only way to get her fixed offshore, so knowing her is important in my book. I hate to think how well I have gotten to know her so far. If I didn't have to dig into engines, electrical systems, waste systems, etc, I wouldn't even know where half that stuff was behind the panels.
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Old 09-03-2013
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Re: A philosophical divide?

Quote:
Originally Posted by wingNwing View Post
As Seaduction said, its only work if you can think of something you'd rather be doing...
GREAT line.
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Re: A philosophical divide?

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Originally Posted by SloopJonB View Post
GREAT line.
No credit here, the quote was from this gentleman:

Nothing is really work unless you would rather be doing something else.
James Matthew Barrie, Sr.
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Re: A philosophical divide?

New boat and ignorant owner
Will pay for maintenance. But will watch and learn. That way when something breaks and there is no yard around maybe I can fix it. Also money not spent on boat is spent on admiral. Everyone happy.
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