The economics of sailing around the world - Page 2 - SailNet Community
View Poll Results: Bare minimum cost of a 3 year circumnavigation? (including the boat)
$0 - 9,999 3 4.62%
$10,000 - 24,999 2 3.08%
$25,000 - 49,999 4 6.15%
$50,000 - 74,999 10 15.38%
$75,000 - 99,999 6 9.23%
$100,000 - 199,999 21 32.31%
$200,000 - 299,999 11 16.92%
$300,000 - 399,999 2 3.08%
$400,000 - 499,999 1 1.54%
$500,000 + 5 7.69%
Voters: 65. You may not vote on this poll

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post #11 of 105 Old 09-09-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

I am one of the $50k to $75k people. This is certainly not our budget since our boat was much more than this. For this price I am picturing something like a Vega properly equipped and a fairly spartan lifestyle with virtually no marinas, few restaurant meals, no insurance, no expensive land travel. The last item would be the one I would most miss as we have really enjoyed traveling around countries as diverse as Ecuador, New Zealand, and South Africa. Two weeks driving to Kruger NP and other parks in SA was not cheap but chance of a lifetime to see lions, elephants, etc up close is a once in a lifetime thing.

Back home on Lake Ontario after something over 36,000 nm circumnavigator. Not surprisingly there is a lot of stuff I want to get done on Ainia both cosmetically and functionally. Getting an early start so it will be ready to go for next summer (Lake Superior?).
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post #12 of 105 Old 09-10-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

When circumnavigated in the 70's I estimated our personal costs at about US$100.00 per person. Insurance wasn't even something one would consider at 1/4 of the value of the boat per year. There were lots of places where a haul out was quite reasonable or free (pilings on a beach). Decent bottom paint could be had for about US$100.00 for 5 gallons from a ship and sails were built to last, unlike the 5 year/100,000 mile "guaranty" of today's sailmakers.
There were not too many expensive electronic aids to break; sextants, stop watches a radio or 2, plotting sheets and a taffrail log, were about it, and not too perishable.
I believe today a couple could cruise comfortably on about a grand a month, but you aren't going to be eating prime rib too many times a month. Keeping damage and wear and tear to a minimum by sailing conservatively and doing haul outs in third world countries would help a lot.
You won't get insurance in that, personal or boat, and things like the Panama and/or Suez canals would probably require a bit of skimping for a few months.
My best suggestion is to get an annuity which would pay you a fixed sum each month, so you know exactly how much income you have each month. Split it into two accounts; one for expenses and one for emergencies.
Working in foreign countries is pretty much prohibited unless you have a skill which they do not, so you can either work for other other yachts or do deliveries to augment your cruising budget. Chartering for cruisers is a pipe dream.
Buying provisions in bulk, if you have the room, can help a lot, but it restricts variety and some folks just can't handle that. Canned butter, cheese, whole chickens and cabin biscuits are good staples and many of the SoPac islands have very reasonable Red Chinese foods in cans.
Always make friends with the crews of freighters; they have washers/driers aboard, free cancelled charts and you'll probably be invited for a meal and a few drinks in their onboard pubs and a game of darts, if it's not a US ship.
But if you can't "live like a local" food wise, it will be very hard to do a trip for that kind of money.
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post #13 of 105 Old 09-10-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Capta, we lived on not much than $1000 a month a few years ago not including insurance but this was with the boat in very good shape and not being in parts of the world where we wanted to travel inland. Also costs of entry into certain countries can kill a budget. Australia was more than $500 and Panama and Ecuador were more. Costs have gone up ... a lot.

Back home on Lake Ontario after something over 36,000 nm circumnavigator. Not surprisingly there is a lot of stuff I want to get done on Ainia both cosmetically and functionally. Getting an early start so it will be ready to go for next summer (Lake Superior?).
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post #14 of 105 Old 09-10-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

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Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
Capta, we lived on not much than $1000 a month a few years ago not including insurance but this was with the boat in very good shape and not being in parts of the world where we wanted to travel inland. Also costs of entry into certain countries can kill a budget. Australia was more than $500 and Panama and Ecuador were more. Costs have gone up ... a lot.
OK, I stand corrected. I never paid for entry into any SoPac country, NZ & OZ included. Indonesia was just a few pennies as was Egypt and most Med countries except Greece. Turkey was US$1.00 for a hundred miles of coastwise travel.
I guess I'm way out of date and I'm sorry about that. Old timer's disease has overtaken me.

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post #15 of 105 Old 09-10-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

I think it just depends on the person.

On land, some can live in a tent in the wilderness for a few bucks a day, and some have to live in the penthouse in downtown New York. It's the same with boats, some can live in a little boat at anchor eating ramen and drinking water, and some are only happy if they are on a crewed yacht eating steak every day. It's all about expectations.

What are you pretending not to know ?

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post #16 of 105 Old 09-10-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Can't fault the OP for having a dream and trying to feel out the cost of it. As stated by many, others experience will not necessarily work for everyone.

I believe a better approach is to figure out what you can come up with for funding and then determine the boat/lifestyle that will afford and decide if its acceptable.

While cruising can be less expensive than living ashore for us, I don't want to go on an extended cruise, if I have to live on austerity to do it. You may feel differently.


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post #17 of 105 Old 09-10-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

I think a decent way is to figure out what your lifestyle is on land.......because that is what you chose and if you are going sailing you probably want to approximate that as much as possible. While living Gilligan's Isle style is romantic most folks seriously cannot stand the idea of no internet, restaurants, other forms of entertainment. In the old days if you could not afford it ....you went anyway and just enjoyed the things you could afford to do.....You did NOT dwell on the safari you missed, the Superbowl Sunday festival or any of the other things that cost more than you could afford.....Do I need to know where I am to 10 meters.....no really...no....I do need a decent set of charts, a compass, good anchor with plenty of chain, coffee....I really need coffee.....plenty of dried goods with a solar distiller, and for grins maybe some paperback books that i got on sale for ten for a dollar because someone else thought they were worthless........ decent flashlight, and serviceable gear....the kind that certain folks call seconds or thirds.....but that is my style.......what is your style on land?....'cause that is your style on sea. Yes I am gonna skip places that want me to pay for the privilege of gracing their country....but there are plenty of other places of equal value that I can go....learn something new and have adventures.......
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post #18 of 105 Old 09-10-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

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Do I need to know where I am to 10 meters.....no really...no....I do need a decent set of charts, a compass, good anchor with plenty of chain, coffee....I really need coffee.....
Actually, if you are attempting to cut costs, you DO need a GPS that will pinpoint your position exactly, and do your navigating relying primarily on electronic charts...

One of the thing that jumped out at me from those folks in Donna's link, was that for a couple averaging over $50K per year in costs, how miniscule was their annual cost for charts and guides... They're obviously relying primarily on e-charts. The cost of carrying "a decent set of (paper) charts" for a circumnavigation today has become astronomical, and those wishing to do their voyaging/navigating 'the old-fashioned way' are gonna pay for it now, bigtime...

The days of doing anything other than a non-stop circumnavigation on the cheap are gone, the fixed costs of fees for entry into various countries have skyrocketed in recent years, they remain basically the same whether you're sailing a 20' Flicka or an 80' Oyster, and will only continue to increase... If one really wants to go places, there's just no getting around many of those costs...

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When actual costs exceeded expectations, the root was repair and maintenance. In a few cases, marina fees in some parts of the world were the reason. “Docking fees have soared in the past few years, and services have become more expensive,” said Barry Esrig, the owner of a Baltic 51, Lady E. “Croatia often charges for anchoring, while Turkey now requires an agent to clear in and out.” Jim Patek of Let’s Go!, an Ovni 435, offered a similar sentiment. “On my latest voyage, I observed right away that the day of the shoestring cruiser is gone,” he said. “In some of the places where we used to anchor, one must now use docking or mooring facilities.”

Cap’n Fatty Goodlander found that on his second circumnavigation aboard his boat, Wild Card, a Hughes 38, costs were occasionally higher than expected due to several factors. “Clearing-in and -out costs are now skyrocketing,” he said.

Jimmy Cornell: What it Costs to Cruise | Cruising World
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post #19 of 105 Old 09-10-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

I've been reading Cap'n Fatty articles for years. He and his wife have circumnavigated on a shoestring budget and seem perfectly happy. I know a few people who would require 20 times what Fatty & his wife spend in order to be happy. Where there's a will there's a way, unless you can't give up certain things not related to survival.
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post #20 of 105 Old 09-10-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Go and read Shrimpy by Shane Acton for some ideas on a minimalist circumnavigation.

BTW IMHO he made several major withdrawals from his luck box to begin with.

The Bunfuzzles are also worth a look for another couple who circumnavigated starting with little experience.

However both Shane Acton and the fuzzles had common sense and stickability. You won't get round without some of both.
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