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View Poll Results: Bare minimum cost of a 3 year circumnavigation? (including the boat)
$0 - 9,999 3 4.62%
$10,000 - 24,999 2 3.08%
$25,000 - 49,999 4 6.15%
$50,000 - 74,999 10 15.38%
$75,000 - 99,999 6 9.23%
$100,000 - 199,999 21 32.31%
$200,000 - 299,999 11 16.92%
$300,000 - 399,999 2 3.08%
$400,000 - 499,999 1 1.54%
$500,000 + 5 7.69%
Voters: 65. You may not vote on this poll

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  #71  
Old 09-12-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

My observations are based on what I see on boats that are far from home and from talking to people that are walking the walk. What Slocum or Aebi or anyone else had is basically irrelevant. If they were doing it today, chances are they souls use modern technology - and I say this as someone who started sailing offshore only with a sextant, RDF, and VHF.

From my perspective, your mileage may differ:

- radar is on 95% of boats. If you are doing a cocoanut rtw you could do without it. For this trip I would prefer AIS

- chartplotter (or laptop charting) is on virtually 100% of boats, must be someone not using this but haven't met them; convenient and saves vast sums compared to paper charts

- VHF -universal, but quite inexpensive,required for entry (and exit) to many commercial harbours

- SSB - probably on 90% of boats, a good shortwave receiver on virtually all. Approaching the South African coast without access to shortwave weather broadcasts would be foolhardy at best and fatal at worst. With SSB it is fairly routine. BTW, the dangers from the Agulhas Current extend beyond the reach of VHF.

- watermaker - probably 75% of boats; rarely an absolute necessity but adds to the quality of life (not talking about hot showers in particular, more about not having to worry about a) quantity of water and b) quality - often times shore water cannot be trusted.

- solar/wind - more than 95% have one or both, the rest run gensets, often twice a day.

- genset - probably 80% of boats, virtually 100% on boats over 40 feet which is to say most boats
- inboard engines - all except one guy on an ancient Bristol 27 even though Slocum did without
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Old 09-12-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

TJC speaks an unfortunate truth. Still having accepted that truth and acted on it many of us old farts are starting out to complete our dreams. This thread has been fascinating with many of the resources listed and linked extremely helpful to me. But to follow TJCs line of thinking if you start you voyaging after your career your tolerance for prolonged discomfort is lower and your physical capabilities are somewhat degraded. Whereas in the past I would be happy to be railmeat- it's an activity that no longer appeals. Similarly cruising I and my bride want easier systems and more comfort. This implies a bigger boat with more complexities both to purchase and maintain. Expense goes up. Before buying my "Last Boat" I went through each thing on the boat and what I expected it to cost year 1,5 and 10.
Averaged expenses and went to financial advisor. He developed spread sheets for his expections of our expenses using real numbers from tax returns and checkbooks. Each family or couple will be different. Best you can say is you can try to give a high and a low for expenses. I expect to have to adjust those estimates as time goes on.
Another point is when faced with the realities of "doing the clock" many ( self included) decide not to do it. For me a circumnavigation of the North Atlantic with a sortie into the north med followed by a circumnavigation of the South Pacific holds more interest. I'll happily leave the capes and pirates to others.
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Last edited by outbound; 09-12-2013 at 05:23 PM.
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  #73  
Old 09-12-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

The biggest variable unless you go outside the norm on a boat purchase is going to be what you do when you are not moving from one location to another. Do you stay at a marina, what do you eat, what site seeing do you do, it's the extracurricular non boat activities that add up quick. Some people are comfortable at anchor catching fish, others have to tie up to a slip in a marina and eat lobster at a 5 star restaurant with bottles of champagne.
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Old 09-12-2013
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Quote:
Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
From my perspective, your mileage may differ:

- radar is on 95% of boats.

- chartplotter (or laptop charting) is on virtually 100%

- VHF -universal, but quite inexpensive,required for entry (and exit) to many commercial harbours

- SSB - probably on 90% of boats,

- watermaker - probably 75% of boats;

- solar/wind - more than 95% have one or both, the rest run gensets, often twice a day.

- genset - probably 80% of boats, virtually 100% on boats over 40 feet which is to say most boats
- inboard engines - all except one guy on an ancient Bristol 27 even though Slocum did without
Just did a quick look at 15 closest boats to me, at a nchor in Grenada.
R adar 8/16 = 50% (higher than what I would have thought.)
C hartplotter 100%
V HF 100%
S SB 20% - not that I know for sure. I can only see 1 out of the 15 with HF antenna/split backstay.
W atermaker 40% I doubt more, but 40% is pretty high. Certainly for the expensive boats above $200k it would be close to 75%
Solar/Wind 100% 5 out of 15 have wind. the rest solar some both.
Genset, as in a dedicated Genset 20% that includes Honda portables.
Inboard Engines 100% - unless they are being fixed!

I do think it would be a good exercise for everyone to pull the b inoculars out in a cruising anchorage and compare notes.

Mark
PS Cut their ads out damn they annoy me in the text of posts
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Mark, your numbers make sense. For rtw, a few more goodies.
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

I voted the 100k-199k cuz I'm not aware of a seaworthy boat much under $100k that is fast enough to suit my interests, but that's just me. Different priorities... If you are going to the trouble of sailing all-the-way-around-the-world, personally, the quality of the transportation device would rank, way, way, up on my list of important things.
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Quote:
Originally Posted by outbound View Post
But to follow TJCs line of thinking if you start you voyaging after your career your tolerance for prolonged discomfort is lower and your physical capabilities are somewhat degraded. Whereas in the past I would be happy to be railmeat- it's an activity that no longer appeals. Similarly cruising I and my bride want easier systems and more comfort. This implies a bigger boat with more complexities both to purchase and maintain. Expense goes up.
Further to this, if one subscribes to the concept that one's income continues to grow as you get older, the older folks like me have to give up way bigger levels of income to go sailing. We have children of friends currently sailing in the Pacific and they are in their late 20's. They gave up way less in terms of income that I will.

Quote:
Originally Posted by outbound View Post
Another point is when faced with the realities of "doing the clock" many ( self included) decide not to do it.
The reality of "doing the clock" is that with all the weather systems going in one direction no matter where you are on the planet, circumnavigations reach a point of no return - where you can't turn around and go home. If you have passed that point you have to go all the way around, whether you're enjoying it or not. Or you ditch the boat and fly home and so end the whole boat ownership thing. One thing is for sure, when you're trying to sell a boat under pressure in a foreign country, you're gonna come seriously second in any price negotiations.
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

The poll stats are beginning to look correct now: 50% say $100,000 to $300,000 for a 3 year circumnavigation INCLUDING price of a boat.

Yes, there are a fair few who say they can do it for less, some more, but whatever silly word a statistician would use for the big blob in the middle is now 50%.

It would be nice to find the number from people who have actually done it. (and what years so we can adjust for inflation)
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Om makes some great points. My thinking remains
You make one pass.
The money just needs to last as long as you.
Once you decide you need to do this the time is now..set a date and work to leave on that date. So far the part I didn't realize would be so hard is disengaging from land life issues. The boat issues have been easier.
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Re: The economics of sailing around the world

Ditto what Mark said- the best poll would be from previous successful circumnavigators. Electronics era, and non-sponsored.
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