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post #21 of 49 Old 04-24-2014
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Re: Lifting Keel Yachts

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e purchased a Seaward 46RK at the 2012 Annapolis Sailboat Show. Both engines failed on the voyage home from the factory, the anchor line broke and vessel ran aground. Keel broke off and keel trunk was pretty much destroyed. Boat was declared a CTL (Constructive Total Loss). The retractable keel function sounds good until you encounter rough weather. At the point, the boat rocks and rolls tremendously. There are numerous things we like about the boat, but would not buy another. Support from the factory for the only people to purchase this boat was very poor.
What a shame. Sorry to hear about your loss.
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post #22 of 49 Old 04-24-2014
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Re: Lifting Keel Yachts

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Originally Posted by CapnRon47 View Post
All,
I also own a lifting keel "Clearwater," mine is hull #5 (they only made 7). Our fuel vent is on the topsides, but much higher up, almost 2' above the water line. I have never had any water in my Racor.



It is a great boat, can go anywhere with a minimum draft of 1' 10". the boat came with 9' long 'duck poles' so you can raft the boat into any shallow water without running the engine.

Ron
My Clearwater 35 has the fuel tank vent located as CapnRon47 shows. Under normal conditions it is connected, but when I took the boat offshore we disconnected the fuel line at the vent and taped over the vent outside the hull. This strategy was intended to deal with the rail being down and the possibility of water entering the vent. So, putting the vent near the waterline is obviously ill-advised, but you need to be prepared for burying your rail under conditions that could push water into an outboard vent--like an overtaking wave. The Clearwater vent faces aft, which should deflect water as you move forward, but safety concerns would dictate that you consider what might happen when you get "caught" offshore.

If you check out the salvage website provided in a previous email, you might get a better impression about what went wrong with the 46K. The loss of engines due to water in the fuel was avoidable with a better vent location , but proper preparation for an offshore passage could have prevented the water ingress. But, worse than that, one has to wonder what the delivery skipper was thinking--assuming that conditions might have allowed for assistance from SeaTow/TowboatUS, etc. to avoid what appears to be a hard, shallow water grounding. Given the damage evident at the salvage website, with running gear ripped off, the hull otherwise looks to be in remarkably good condition. The lifting keel trunk appears to have suffered the worst of it. It may not be fair to dump on the manufacturer without understanding what the delivery skipper did with the boat in the first place.

The Seaward 46K daggerboard design is interesting, especially with the lead bulb that in principle provides enhanced stability and the advantage of a high aspect fin. That said, a lower aspect, swing keel is more likely to survive a hard impact.
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post #23 of 49 Old 04-24-2014
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Re: Lifting Keel Yachts

I have always admired that Clearwater 35. I have a friend who owns one.

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post #24 of 49 Old 04-24-2014
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Re: Lifting Keel Yachts

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Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
Note to Self:

Never, EVER place fuel tank vents in the topsides, only inches above the waterline...

One of the most stunningly stupid things I've ever seen a builder do...







That builder is/was not alone. We bought the boat below, a brand new, Skipjack 20, after selling our sail boat. The tank vent was forward about half way between the deck and the water line. The only filter was an in-line metal canister about the size of a large egg.

Anyway, the factory did not build a high enough loop in the vent line allowing water to be forced into the tank when we went through a large wave, which was often. We discovered the problem when trying to come in from a trip to the Farrallone Islands out of San Francisco. The engine would not run past trolling speed until it finally cleared up enough for us to get in.

The bottom of the carburetor float bowl was filled with salt crystals as shown in your picture. I re-built the vent line with a loop as high as I could make it, drained the tank, & installed a water separator/filter like the on in your picture, end of problem. The Manufacturer wanted no part in admitting their mistake.

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post #25 of 49 Old 04-24-2014
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Re: Lifting Keel Yachts

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Originally Posted by fallard View Post
My Clearwater 35 has the fuel tank vent located as CapnRon47 shows. Under normal conditions it is connected, but when I took the boat offshore we disconnected the fuel line at the vent and taped over the vent outside the hull. This strategy was intended to deal with the rail being down and the possibility of water entering the vent. So, putting the vent near the waterline is obviously ill-advised, but you need to be prepared for burying your rail under conditions that could push water into an outboard vent--like an overtaking wave. The Clearwater vent faces aft, which should deflect water as you move forward, but safety concerns would dictate that you consider what might happen when you get "caught" offshore.
Smart move... I can't think of any good reason to ever have a tank vent placed below deck level, no matter which direction it's 'facing'... Especially, those that are placed amidships. This was by no means serious weather, it was a perfect sailing day, I was just a tad overpowered with that Code 0, is all :-)





And yet it's amazing how often such placement is seen. Caliber Yachts, a "bluewater" production boat of higher than average quality, placed the vents amidships, well below deck level, on their 40, for example. You can see it just above the fender in this pic:





I see no reason why a fuel vent can't be tucked away, out of the weather, and able to be capped, or otherwise shut off with a valve, in the event of extreme weather. Mine is inside a cockpit coaming box, as high in the coaming as possible...

And, although these are perhaps the single most overpriced items in the West Marine or Defender catalogs, I can't understand why these fuel vent whistles aren't more commonplace on boats today. I have yet to EVER run a boat other than my own equipped with one, and yet if one is properly installed, it's a virtual guarantee you will never get a single drop of fuel overflow when filling your tank from a fuel pump, and allow you to place your vent anywhere without worrying about spillage...




Green Marine Fuel Whistle

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Originally Posted by fallard View Post
If you check out the salvage website provided in a previous email, you might get a better impression about what went wrong with the 46K. The loss of engines due to water in the fuel was avoidable with a better vent location , but proper preparation for an offshore passage could have prevented the water ingress. But, worse than that, one has to wonder what the delivery skipper was thinking--assuming that conditions might have allowed for assistance from SeaTow/TowboatUS, etc. to avoid what appears to be a hard, shallow water grounding. Given the damage evident at the salvage website, with running gear ripped off, the hull otherwise looks to be in remarkably good condition. The lifting keel trunk appears to have suffered the worst of it. It may not be fair to dump on the manufacturer without understanding what the delivery skipper did with the boat in the first place.
The story I heard was that this incident occurred while entering Little Creek, VA... Not much margin for error, there, and if he'd lost power close to the entrance, he could have been on the beach in a jiffy...

However, in my experience, even with twin engines drawing from the same tank - assuming each had its own Racor, of course - it's extremely unlikely that both would have shut down simultaneously. I've run a lot of twin screw stinkpots over the years, and have had plenty of engines shut down, but I don't believe I've ever lost both engines at once... One or the other will at least give you some advance notice that the other might be about to quit :-)

We'll have to wait and see, perhaps the former owner will offer some more details...
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post #26 of 49 Old 04-24-2014
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Re: Lifting Keel Yachts

The seascape 27 has a 1-meter, 580kg (out of a total displacement of 1380kg) hydraulic centerboard. Looks hot. Obviously, with a boat like that, the centerboard is designed more for trailering, but if you wanted to doodle around in shallow water with the engine, it'd be nice. 27 » Seascape
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post #27 of 49 Old 04-24-2014
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Re: Lifting Keel Yachts

Outbounds are built with fuel vents in the life line stanchions . Vent faces aft. Simple and effective. With four fuel tanks clever way to deal with issue. My boat and many I've seen mount two racors side by side. One clogs switch to the other. Takes second and may save you in a tight spot.

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post #28 of 49 Old 04-24-2014
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Maiden Voyage of the S/V Blue Dog-Seaward 46RK

My wife and I are the former owners of the Hake Seaward 46 RK “Blue Dog”. The vessel ran aground on the maiden voyage from the factory with Hake's Delivery Skipper aboard. We waited a year to write about this event as it was too painful when it happened.

Since this event occurred bringing the vessel home from the factory with Hake Yacht’s delivery skipper, we were quite upset at the manufacturer. With the passage of time, I can now look at the events a bit more objectively. We have also been asked to write an article on this for Cruising Outpost Magazine and may take them up on that offer. In the meantime, here is a shortened version...

We took delivery of the Blue Dog at a marina adjacent to the Hake Yacht shop in Stuart, FL April 2013. We were underway for about two weeks from Stuart, FL to Little Creek. (Norfolk, VA) with a plan to move in and out of the ICW depending on weather conditions. As there were small craft advisories offshore for the majority of the journey, we elected to motor virtually the entire trip in the ICW. Our goal was to not take unnecessary risks on the way home until we got to know the boat better. As we were in the ICW with little opportunity to sail, the main was not rigged. It should have been and as the owner and longtime sailor, that was my mistake.
After two weeks underway we rounded Ft. Wool leaving the ICW/Norfolk Harbor on a Friday evening in early May and encountered ~5’-6’ seas in the Chesapeake and winds blowing 25-30. Not that big of a deal as we crossed the Albemarle the night before and the seas were worse. The Blue Dog began to rock and roll pretty violently and we remembered to lower the keel as it had been fully raised for most of the trip. That helped a little, but not very much.

We had a slip at East Beach Marina at Little Creek and just passed the Ocean View fishing pier when I heard “beeeeeeeeep.” The wind was very loud and seas were rough. The boat felt different and it took me a minute or so to realize the starboard engine had quit. The twin Yanmar 54s had run flawlessly for 1,000 miles. The engines had run so well for so long I had not considered the possibility that one had stopped. I was at the helm and I asked the delivery skipper to re-start the stbd engine. He did and it fired up no problem. I distinctly remember saying to him, “That’s why we bought a boat with two engines.”
About ½ hour later the port engine quit and would not re-start. At that point, I knew we had bigger issues since both engines were affected. We were approximately one mile from our slip when the stbd engine quit and would not re-start. I had informed our friends and family that we were coming in and they were watching from the tower in our sub division in East Beach as we began to drift. There was no way to get the main up as you have to climb 6’ off the deck to secure the main halyard to the sheet and it was too rough. I instructed the delivery skipper to deploy the anchor.

We were ½ mile or so off shore and the anchor began dragging. We let out more rode and we stopped. I called my wife, Sea Tow, USCG and Norfolk Marine Police. It was too rough for Sea Tow to come out and they did not have a towboat big enough for a 46’ vessel. USCG asked if any person was in danger, we said, “No.” At that point, we were pretty much on our own and in sight of our marina. Very frustrating. A few minutes later I asked the delivery skipper to check the anchor and he reported that it was “Tight as a banjo string.” I began running through options if the anchor gave way. A few minutes later we began drifting. The anchor line had parted. I used the electric furler and unfurled the jib. In just a few seconds we were underway. Unfortunately, we could not tack with the jib, only jibe downwind and we were unable to make headway towards the marina. We sailed back and forth just offshore of our home for about 45 minutes as the sun was going down.

Fuel gauges showed ¼ tank and I assumed that the gauge was wrong and we had run out of fuel. The Norfolk Marine Police brought us two 5 gallon jerry cans of diesel and matched speed and course in rough weather to deliver us fuel. They were AWESOME with their boat handling skills and stayed beside us through this whole ordeal.
Unfortunately, there was ample fuel, but water was the issue. Neither engine would restart.
It is now getting dark and the chart plotter is in Daylight mode. I’m at the helm and have my hands full steering the boat in rough seas. I ask the delivery boat skipper to put the chart plotter in night mode as the light from the plotter was so bright it was blinding me. He was reaching through the wheel trying to toggle through the different modes to get to “night mode” and I told him to “Shut the dammed thing off so I can see.” He did and about 60 seconds later we ran aground. I was at the helm and take full responsibility for that.

We had run aground around 15th Bay St in the Norfolk neighborhood of Ocean View. The Norfolk Fire Department was on scene and called to us to abandon ship and come ashore. It was one of the most painful things I have ever done. We deployed the backup anchor hoping to keep the boat as far away from the beach as possible as it was low tide. Water was waist deep and I had my foul weather gear on and waded ashore.

Recovery over the weekend is another story, but I will say that the folks who came together to help us were extraordinary.
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post #29 of 49 Old 04-24-2014
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Re: Maiden Voyage of the S/V Blue Dog-Seaward 46RK

[QUOTE=vwmarshall;1771625]My wife and I are the former owners of the Hake Seaward 46 RK “Blue Dog”.

Welcome to Sailnet. Thanks for the story. Sorry for your lose, she was a beautiful boat. Hope you guys are still sailing.

oursailingadventures.com
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post #30 of 49 Old 04-24-2014
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Re: Lifting Keel Yachts

Hi Fallard
What size stayset do you use for the keel pennant and does it ever get fouled by growth?
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