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  #31  
Old 10-25-2013
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Re: Thinking of Losing My Inboard

If I can chime, Don't do it. I did do it on a 28 foot fin keel. It worked OK, but there are severe limits to its practicality. It was fine in flat water, not so much in choppy. Although the diesel was nearly 300 lbs, the 120lb outboard hung off the stern left her trimmed down at the stern by a few inches, kept my rudder stuffing box under water, and caused a small drip. Having a decent sized crew member walk to the bow to grab a mooring line would raise the prop enough to basically end forward propulsion. My OB has a 10 amp alternator, next to useless given the limited run time. Not to mention above deck fuel tank and wiring was messy. I was saving for a repower and had an OB hanging around, so it didn't cost much, and it let me use the boat, but as a permanent solution the cons outweigh the pros. On a double ender, I don't see an easy way to install a mount, without an expensive engineering project. And just to start another controversy, I found the Beta 14 to be the least expensive diesel option. IIRC, the rebuild on the 1 cyl Yanmar was $5300, and the Beta was $5700 with a 2 year warranty, or some such.
Lou
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  #32  
Old 10-25-2013
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Re: Thinking of Losing My Inboard

The Laurin Koster seems to have a high pedigree . To put a out board on would be a mistake for all that has been said , plus ruin her good looks .

Last edited by Markwesti; 10-25-2013 at 01:39 PM.
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  #33  
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Re: Thinking of Losing My Inboard

Quote:
Originally Posted by lillia28 View Post
If I can chime, Don't do it. I did do it on a 28 foot fin keel. It worked OK, but there are severe limits to its practicality. It was fine in flat water, not so much in choppy. Although the diesel was nearly 300 lbs, the 120lb outboard hung off the stern left her trimmed down at the stern by a few inches, kept my rudder stuffing box under water, and caused a small drip. Having a decent sized crew member walk to the bow to grab a mooring line would raise the prop enough to basically end forward propulsion. My OB has a 10 amp alternator, next to useless given the limited run time. Not to mention above deck fuel tank and wiring was messy. I was saving for a repower and had an OB hanging around, so it didn't cost much, and it let me use the boat, but as a permanent solution the cons outweigh the pros. On a double ender, I don't see an easy way to install a mount, without an expensive engineering project. And just to start another controversy, I found the Beta 14 to be the least expensive diesel option. IIRC, the rebuild on the 1 cyl Yanmar was $5300, and the Beta was $5700 with a 2 year warranty, or some such.
Lou
$5300 seems steep. Did you have the rebuild done at a marine shop?

I've done a few automotive engines (gas). I was going to have the Yanmar (head, block, crank, & piston) professionally remachined (w/ new valves seated), doing the breakdown and reassembly myself from a full rebuild kit - replacing other components (impellers, oil pump, etc) as necessary. I haven't reviewed the manual yet to write-up a game plan.

Something I'm missing, is this harder then it seems on a marine engine?

By the way, does anyone know the Kubota equivalent of a Yanmar 1GM10 for parts sourcing?

Last edited by Kielanders; 10-26-2013 at 12:16 AM.
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  #34  
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Re: Thinking of Losing My Inboard

Hi,
I live in Australia and have a 28' cruiser, it originally had a 20HP Panther Diesel, the previous owner removed it and put a 15HP Mariner 4 Stroke Big Foot Outboard on her.
I, personally, don't feel the motor is big enough, the river I cruise floods frequently, and even though extra HP wouldn't make the old girl go any faster, some extra oomph would be really nice in the flood times.
The other issue, which I will rectify in the future, is steering, now the thrust is behind the rudder, not a lot of maneuverability. I don't want to remove the steering from the rudder, as when not using the outboard, still want to be able to steer, looking at a dual cable setup to attach to motor and rudder.
As the motor is a long shaft, there is a lot of leg in the water, and I have not had an issue with the prop coming out of the water, but in saying that, I haven't been in the big blue either.
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  #35  
Old 10-26-2013
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Re: Thinking of Losing My Inboard

The rebuild was from the local Yanmar dealer. It was a YSM 12, an older 1 cylinder. Parts are available, but expensive. I've done gas engines, including DOHC Alfa engines, so I figured a 1 Cyl couldn't be that bad. After pricing parts, the labor wasn't bad, and it would be done in two weeks, rather than numerous weekends. Even around here winters aren't that long. As mentioned, the Atomic 4 is a good option, as long as reconfiguring doesn't expand the job too much. Several marine engines use Kubota as a base, so parts shouldn't be a problem. My boat was lost in Sandy, and I found a duplicate with a "recently" rebuilt YSM 12, so I ended up finessing that issue.
Good luck.
Lou

UOTE=Kielanders;1110625]$5300 seems steep. Did you have the rebuild done at a marine shop?

I've done a few automotive engines (gas). I was going to have the Yanmar (head, block, crank, & piston) professionally remachined (w/ new valves seated), doing the breakdown and reassembly myself from a full rebuild kit - replacing other components (impellers, oil pump, etc) as necessary. I haven't reviewed the manual yet to write-up a game plan.

Something I'm missing, is this harder then it seems on a marine engine?

By the way, does anyone know the Kubota equivalent of a Yanmar 1GM10 for parts sourcing?[/QUOTE]
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  #36  
Old 10-26-2013
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Re: Thinking of Losing My Inboard

Rebuiulding a 1GM10 is more akin to rebuilding a lawnmower than an automobile. it is a very simple engine. With the exception of the con rod bolts and valve keepers it is basically a two wrench & two screwdriver job.
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  #37  
Old 10-30-2013
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Re: Thinking of Losing My Inboard

some diesels are dead cheap to rebuild, some have parts availabilty issues and some are darn stupid to fix price wise(volvo)

I just took the decision to dump my palmer p60 inboard gas engine, not cause I wanted to I think they are great, but because I had no way of replcaing a part deemed extinct...

especially overseas where there was absolutely no way of replacing or fixing this part.

I previoulsy had an atomic 4(on another boat) which was simple, dead reliable and easy to service...I dont even have that option now, so I am left with a nice gas tank...clean bilge and no inboard...prop and shaft.

time to either cobble up and electric diy setup or use a 15hp outboard on a bracket...

Im also a firm beleiver in the kiss principle, unlike most common theories around, guys who need more horsepower and huge inboards are those that coastal cruise more and use marinas more...simply because you need to or have to motor into these places either by marina laws or other...

offshore sailors can make do with a solar panel and an outboard easily every new port...I have done it and been on boats that prove this...

when you sail 1-3k miles at a time only to anchor on a nice cove or atoll, or sheltered bay...your inboard is a very very far away thought...not even needed if you think about it...

ps. I will say this, I loved my yanmar2gm when it worked...on a small sailboat however it suffered though, first from corrosion and exposure to the elements, second from too much movement and bad motorsailing from the angles, and thrid I always always had to clean the filters when cruising almost every other day...either water from condensation or dirty fuel even after filtering with a baja filter wasnt enough...

I honestly spent more time working on the engine than checking sails or doing sail maintenance..which if you think about it is ridiiculoous on a sailboat.

lastly almost every port where we anchored at 90% of the boats that where there where either doing something related to engine work or repowering jobs, they ALL had work to do even if the engine was new and they all consumed huge amounts of maintenance when compared to other parts of the boat...think sails, mast, basic rigging, etc...

again sailboat being the key issue here...

peace


cheers
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  #38  
Old 10-31-2013
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Re: Thinking of Losing My Inboard

So.. why not ditch the engine altogether?

You mentioned you had a 28' full-keel double-ender.. There's an entire class of 28' full-keel double-enders called Tumlaren who manage quite happily with a tiny outboard and a paddle stowed away in the bilge (for absolutely flat calm conditions) and the rest of the time they just sail.

Here's what they look like:





Yep, that's right. No engine. It's a sailing boat..
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Last edited by Classic30; 10-31-2013 at 01:35 AM.
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  #39  
Old 11-07-2013
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Re: Thinking of Losing My Inboard

I thought of a few more reasons why not having an engine is a great idea:
  1. No oil leaks in the bilge
  2. No need to spend big $$$ on engine parts and maintenance
  3. No shaft bearing to maintain and leak.
  4. No propeller to foul, get caught on things and slow you down
  5. Less weight aft.
I'm sure others can add to the list..
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  #40  
Old 11-07-2013
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Re: Thinking of Losing My Inboard

I can play this game too! jajaja

other items off the list:

never get fined for "spilling" (had this happen in santa barbara, one bottle of joy was not enough!)
where to store dirty oil is not an issue anymore
no need for huge matts and cleanup materials, YOUR FIRE and explosion possibilities decrease by a huge percentage(propane leaks cause more fires though)
SPACE! you earn a lot of it!

anywhoo

kielanders I wish you the best finding a suitable replacement, going electric or using an outboard...

I forgot to mention that having an inboard is really dependant on where you cruise and sail...

big currents and tides, and rugged cruising grounds like alaska and the pnw do require you to have extra HP.

the same goes for cruising inside cape horn and such...I wouldnt go inshore unless I had a massive diesel and even a spare kicker just in case...when the wind dies and you have 4-8 knots of tide or current to fight the **** hits the fan BIG time!

PEACE
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