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  #41  
Old 11-06-2013
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How to sleep

A diesel mechanic found the boats generator mixing elbow cracked so our departure has been delayed till repaired. Router at yesterday's briefing that we need to be south of 34N and on other side of Gulf Stream before Thursday night when front comes thru. Departure might be delayed even further.
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  #42  
Old 11-06-2013
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Re: How to sleep

Ugh! Good luck!
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  #43  
Old 11-06-2013
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Re: How to sleep

Quote:
Originally Posted by brokesailor View Post
A diesel mechanic found the boats generator mixing elbow cracked so our departure has been delayed till repaired. Router at yesterday's briefing that we need to be south of 34N and on other side of Gulf Stream before Thursday night when front comes thru. Departure might be delayed even further.
Damn, that sucks...

Ahhh, the joys of complexity and systems dependency in a cruising sailboat... Yeah, I just love it when your plans are dictated by the need for the functionality of something like a freakin' generator... :-)

Good luck...
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  #44  
Old 11-06-2013
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Re: How to sleep

Quote:
Originally Posted by brokesailor View Post
How do you stay in bed? Or should I just sleep on the floor?
Practice. It's not that difficult.

I don't have a lee cloth. I sleep in the forward berth at sea, even when solo unless it's very congested waters, I find my 20 minute sleeps blew are better than on deck because I am more comfortable.

So how was it in January this year when I did 14 days working to windward?no it got to be a bit of a grind and I didn't need to winch another sail in for a while (I just did a 3 night passage and I don't need to reef a sail again for a while!), but I was comfortable and safe and never rolled out of bed. A couple of pillows is good to prop up the low side a bit, and when you drop off a huge wave it does tend to influence your dreams.... Lol. But it's fine.

Just give it a go.


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  #45  
Old 11-07-2013
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Re: How to sleep

No way to tell for certain yet, but I'm presuming these might be boats associated with the Salty Dawg Rally:

Quote:

Coast Guard, Navy respond to sailboats in storm

By Lauren King
The Virginian-Pilot
© November 7, 2013

Three sailboats issued distress alerts this afternoon as a storm that moved through Hampton Roads earlier today moved off the coast.

The Coast Guard and Navy cruiser Vella Gulf responded to the alerts, but only one of the three sailboats, more than 200 miles east of Virginia Beach, was in contact with rescuers tonight. The sailboat was taking on water and crewmembers reported feeling sick, said Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class David Weydert. Coast Guard crews reported seeing 10- to 12-foot peak waves.

About 10 p.m., the Coast Guard helicopter was refueling aboard the Vella Gulf and Weydert said the four people aboard the sailboat should be hoisted to the helicopter within the hour.

Meanwhile, a Coast Guard HC-130 Hercules airplane, which had been first on the scene about 6 p.m., was finishing its search further south and then heading back to Elizabeth City. A second C-130 was heading out to the area from Elizabeth City to continue searching for the other sailboats, Weydert said.

The search, he said, was expected to continue through the night.

The three distress alerts came in after 2 p.m. today. The two alerts from the boats more than 200 miles off Virginia Beach were received from a satellite tracking device and a third alert came from an emergency indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) further south, more than 200 miles east of Elizabeth City, according to a Coast Guard news release.

The Vella Gulf arrived at the location off Virginia Beach before 8 p.m. The Coast Guard helicopter crew arrived there about an hour later.

Weydert said a fourth sailboat later reported an injured person aboard, but no other problems. That boat was located near Ocracoke Inlet and a Coast Guard boat was sent to the area.

Coast Guard, Navy respond to sailboats in storm | HamptonRoads.com | PilotOnline.com
The last week or so has been a challenging one for boats headed south...

Coast Guard coordinates rescue of solo sailor 700 miles east of Cape Cod in-20-ft seas | CapeCodToday.Com

Easy Go Adventures
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  #46  
Old 11-08-2013
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How to sleep

I do know that 2 boats were dismasted and a third was taking on water on a rescue was in progress.
We plan on leaving today late morning.
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Old 11-08-2013
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Re: How to sleep

Yikes. I have been watching the Carib 1500. It looks like they made it past the weather ok leaving Saturday.....
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Old 11-08-2013
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Re: How to sleep

Am wondering about the storm tactics employed and storm equipment carried by the boats that needed to be rescued. I can understand boats being close to shore, disabled, and concerned about being thrown up on rocks but those who push the button on an EPIRB simply because they have a ripped sail seem to be bailing WAY too soon. The cost of "rescuing" those who are not equipped to be offshore and who have not employed every available option before calling for a C130 will surely cause legislation and rules to affect all of us.
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Old 11-08-2013
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How to sleep

Here's an email one of our crew got from a boat he was trying get on in the rally. I think they cast off on Monday. When we left for the open ocean, Oct.31, it was with forecasts from four sources: Passage Weather, Buoy Weather, our good friend, John Oldner (who has been helping us for three years), and Chris Parker (a professional weather router provided by the Salty Dawg Rally) with a reference in his S-Bound supplement on the 30th. (The day before he stated we would be better off leaving the 30th vs. leaving on the 31st.) However, all of our sources said if we were to get S & E of a LINE...(from one GPS point to another) by midnight Sat.2., 215 miles for us, on 11/2, we would be south and east of the harder NNW winds and seas from an approaching front. Thank God, we are now back in Wilmington, as not only were we sailing close hauled beating into the south winds and south east seas trying to reach our 3 day way point, on a rhumb line of 110'T to make 30N,070W in three days, 450 miles; the following happened.
As it turned out, a "monster" high pressure cell of 1046 mb came out of Nova Scotia with drastic compression of the pressure gradients, creating horrible winds well south and east of our three day way point where we were looking for more moderate conditions and NNW winds on our tail as we went down slope to the SE. Thus, instead of catching an ideal fast track, we would be in 35-38 kt sustained, g45 with huge breaking seas!!!
Prior to the following, enroute we were reefed and easily making 8kts close hauled (meaning almost into the wind but directly into the waves of 7-9 ft.), which was too hard of a beating, so we had to slow to 7. Which was still plenty rough. But at only 125 miles out about 1400hrs. on Fri. the 1st (our first day avg. speed slow due to 6 hr. motor around Frying Pan Shoals on a course of 160'T, and a Gulf Stream change, setting us north. Two hours short of 24hrs. the mainsail blew out. We are unbelievably grateful to our crew member, Emitt Smith from Annapolis, who we met through the wonderful Offshore Passage Opportunities service, knew exactly what to do and how to do it. With Emitt on deck, the most adept crew person on the winches, Carol handled the main halyard and main furling lines using one hand on the lines, and one toe on the winch buttons, while hanging on with her two remaining appendages.Our other crew guy, Howard Dworkin was right out there on deck with Emitt on his back lying on the cabin top gathering the sail in his arms as Emitt passed it down to him. A hard roll and a boarding wave (even having the boat slow, we had to be into the wind to get the sail down) slid him off the cabin top slamming him side ways into our tall toe rail, giving him various injuries. But, both crew hung in there and got the job done. Other than Howard getting hurt, I have to say it went very well. Emitt, having retrieved torn sails before, thoroughly briefed all of us on what had to be done. Of course we were harnessed and clipped in. It is very unfortunate that Howard was hurt, with bad bruises to his side, hip, and lacerations to his elbow. However, to his credit he stayed right in there finishing the sail retrieval and then never missing a watch.
Soon after getting the sail down, secure, and Howard's wounds dressed, the steering cables fell off the quadrant!!! Due to an installation error.This jammed the wheel while hand steering. Then the auto pilot tripped, but the wheel then went totally free with no rudder control meaning we were completely without steering, going in circles. I was able to reset the auto pilot, and we could then take a slow course under power down wind, settling the boat considerably. It took almost three hours to re-track the cables onto the quadrant, because the auto pilot had to make considerable small corrections. It was much worse with auto off because the seas moved the rudder back and forth much more vigorously. Finally, after the hardest mechanic job, I have ever done, was complete, bleeding as usual, we were underway again. This job, at the dock, would have taken only 15 minutes, tops. However, after nearly three hours we had drifted far enough north that it was an even closer to the wind and waves back to Cape Fear around the Frying Pan Shoals, which set us up for the next casualty. As we had to tack twice, WNW & SE, using the motor and only the genoa sail.
We had new cables and conduits placed this past summer, because the factory had installed them wrong. This time the technician forgot to put on lock nuts!!! Some hell will have to be paid for that.
But, on to the next casualty. When we were due east, after tacking south all night, of Frying Pan Shoals, we would have to motor directly into the W wind in confused seas of 5-7 feet. We had to have some sail stability to dampen the rolling, but the genoa could not go directly into the wind. Thus, we furled the genoa and let out the stays'l, sheeting it dead center with an over sight. We let it out too far and struck the radar guard hard, breaking it off. I immediately shut off the breaker, to prevent possible burn out. Fortunately, the guard fouled up there and did not go overboard, until we got to South Port Marina around 0100 Sun. the 2nd, when I could go up the mast later that morning to secure it. I found it was fouled on the power cable to the radome, kinking it badly. As yet, we do not know if the cable is damaged. It also damaged our steaming light and deck light. I can repair the guard, as it is just broken screws, too small for the job. Another inadequate job done in commissioning, in 2011, that we paid $1800 to some one we formerly trusted!
That same Sunday morning, we motored up river to Wilmington and the Bennett Brothers Boat Yard. Mack Sails in Florida, having seen pictures and talking with the Bennett Brothers Yachts Service Manager (a life time rigger himself) say that they can definitely repair the sail. We can share pictures when we replace the SIM card reader we lost. They also say that they can turn it around in two days, as a favor to the BBY S.M.. So, we can probably be fit to travel in about 8 days, vs. weeks.
Here is the working theory of the sail blow out: The boom vang failed internally, allowing the boom angle to drop and place a lot of stress on the aft end of the sail, because we were sheeted in hard. With the traveler down to take off some heel, thus the compression on the vang was tremendous. In other years we had depended upon the topping lift to support the boom, using the vang only to let the boom lift and belly the sail. We were told by a very good rigger to use the vang for boom support, as our high roach sail fouls on the topping lift, with the main up full. Reefed and in hard conditions, I should have figured the topping lift should have been more tight, helping to carry the strain and keep the boom angle correct. Hindsight!!!???
As yet we do not know if we have the courage to go back out there. Since we have 250 gal of fuel on board, a window of gently motor sailing would be very tempting.
However, you can imagine how timid we feel about going back out. The longer
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Old 11-08-2013
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Re: How to sleep

It sounds like they have my luck. I'm glad nothing worse happened to them; at least they are all alive and without major injuries, and the boat is still in once piece. Please let them know that there are a lot of fellow sailors sending "good vibes" their way.
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