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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #11  
Old 02-09-2005
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sailnaway is on a distinguished road
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Ok so you want to know how to envolve more young people in sailing this is simple. Sell your boat for half of what you think its worth talk everyone into doing the same and your half way to your goal.Take half of your half give it back to the young person for maintance then teach them all that you know for free and you might have a few kids folling you around wanting to go sailing. The sad truth is money is a huge factor and also sailing for the rocket kids of today is as mundane as taking grandma to the prom. I don''t think past the skiff racers you see on Saturday. The flock of little boats darting everywhere with little heads sticking up with serious looks on thier faces are who I am refering to. Kids today don''t dream of sailing off to the South Pacific.We meaning the boomers we had James A Mitchner not sure if thats how its spelled but we had sailing heros and allot of followed the lure they presented us with Erol Flynn and actors like him gave us adventure to heat our blood to the boiling point. I have started building a DVD collection of all the sailors and pirates that were in fact some of my heros. Today we have kids who don''t go out to play they stay home on the Play Station and Sponge Bob is thier latest hero.Sad but we are for the most part the last of the average guy sailors left. Sailing is becoming a rich mans endevor. Some day in the future you will not see people who work for a living that don''t make at least six figures sailing it will just cost to much.
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  #12  
Old 02-10-2005
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TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough
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sailnaway,
Not everyone''s impression of the present state and future of sailing is as clouded as the view from your crow''s nest. Our marina is filled with families that love sailing. It warms my heart to see our dockmate friends, a young couple with three children, leave the marina each weekend in their Sabre for an extended weekend adventure.

The smiles upon their''s and other seagoing family faces finding respite in sailing, is encouragement that the joy and passion is not fading.
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  #13  
Old 02-10-2005
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sonofasailorsailing is on a distinguished road
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I had wanted to sail for years, indeed decades. I used to wander around marinas drooling over the boats that seemed to sit there and never move. I was so jealous! I would read the prevailing sailing magazines and thought that I could never aford the monetary outlay of hundreds of thousands of dollars. A few years ago, I moved to the Florida Panhandle and started reading more realistic sailing pubs. I purchased my first boat, a 1976 Chrysler 22 for $1,000 and the fun began. Now I still own that boat and a 33'' yawl. It does not have to be a rich mans sport. You just have to want to.

As to the age of sailors in this area. I see alot of younger people (I am 52) on sailing cats and other small boats all the time and they are having a ball. I have a feeling that lager boats are in their futures as well. Everyone has to start somewhere.

Henry
Glander Tavana 33
"Patience Too"
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  #14  
Old 02-12-2005
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dman is on a distinguished road
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One of the biggest problems I can see in the boating industry is the image.The only people I know who go to their boat shows for the most part are boat owners.To most young people sailing just isn`t cool and they have never sailed before.A perfect example of a company changing their image would be Harley.If you rode their bikes years ago you were either a cop or a scumbag biker.Now you can`t turn on the tube without these guys on acting like their superstars.People of all walks of life are uniting to some extent and paying alot more money for a custom bike than I would pay for a 30 foot boat.If you pick up a magazine, that would attract someone by looking at the cover,they will show a multi million dollar yacht.Now who does that attract to boating?Another rich boater.I find many boaters want that "elite" handle and then we wonder why there are not more people involved.The only way this industry will grow will be by us the boaters inviting people to go sailing that would never have had a chance otherwise.
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  #15  
Old 02-12-2005
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Sasha_V will become famous soon enough
how do we.....

I disagree about bvoat shows being promarily for existing boat owners.

Several years ago now, Before we had bought our first boat there was a big boat show on in our town. Not entirely sure why we went along, I think I suggested it so that margaret could see if she could develop any enthusiasm for it.

We went, looked at a bunch of boats including some trailer-sailors that were kitted out like the 1st class salons of the QEII. Margaret was ho-humm about it and put on a brave face and said "if you really want to do this sort of thing, I will give it a go"

Down on the water, a club like Sail Victoria or Youthsail or someone was offering free "rides" in micro-dinghies.

This is basically a small unsinkable hull the size of a bathtub. catboat-rigged with the rudder control being a fighter-pilot style joystic between the legs of the operator. The mainsheet control was off to one side and handled with the lef hand. The entire thing was like a floating motorcycle sidecar with a mast. They also had a couple of two-seater version for people with very young children or for squeezing two kids into. A supply of lifejackets and a rescue zodiac completed the outfit.

Well, Margaret, who is only five feet tall waited in line with the 8-15 year olds (and there were hundreds of them) and was eventually put into a litte sailing tub, with twenty seconds of explanation of the controlls and absolutely zero prior knowledge or experience.

15 minutes later she was back at the dockside, beaming form ear to ear and saying "Right, lets head back to the boatshow proper. I think I saw a sailing school display near us. I also want to take a look at that red 24footer again, I don''t think we should buy one like it, but there was a thing I wanted to show you and see if you could build into the boat we do buy....."

Incidentaly, we have made going to that boat show a yearly event. At every single year margaret makes a point of taking out one of the micro-tubs for her 15 minutes (The funny bit was that it was only after getting her coastal-skipper ticket and a bunch of other qualifications that she managed to get thelittle microtub in irons, float into the side of a mega-yacht and need rescue from the zodiac! (but it is probably cruel to poiint that out and giggle over it). Also at every boat showsince the first, I have tended to drift to the micro-tub area and volunteer to help out. I do not l know where you are, but there is no shortage of kids and young adults wanting to get into sailing where we are.


Sasha
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  #16  
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Sasha_V will become famous soon enough
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Oh, to answer the second part of you post.
In Australia, there does not tend to be a lot of patience for the sailors that want to be seen to be in the rich and elite class etc...
They are know as the white cravat set and pretty universally seen as and refered to as WANKERS.

As a result, you get the millionaire sailors working extra hard to appear to be just regular folks and such so as to fit in to the sailing commaraderie that exists here.

I had been friends with one boater for about two years. Sailed with him often and all that. It was only a month or two ago that he let drop that he got about $14million for selling off his company and such. Sure, he has a nice boat and car, but he wears the same raggy old clothes and does his own repairs like everyone else when doing boat stuff. Nothing elite about it.

That tends to be more of the standard around here.

Sasha
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  #17  
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sailnaway is on a distinguished road
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True Blue you make refrence to the sailing in Newport California this is not a good comparison to any place else in the USA.Can I buy a home in Newport for $200.000 I don''t think so.
The cost of sailing in relationship to the income is offset in the rest of the country.I have also lived in Long Island and Annapolis and Ft Lauderdale close to Newport in housing cost and income.I use to live in Palos Verde and have a fair idea of the cost of living in So Calin an upscale neighborhood.The boats in every city are about the same cost but repairs and dock fees are much diffrent. A teacher lets say here in New Orleans makes about $30,000 after taxes which is after 13 years of teaching. The intery level is about $19.000 you cant pay for an apartment and a car and have a boat on that salary.This is the problem all over low wages and the cost of boating has started to force people away from the yacht crowd. Small boats 25'' and under are in but anything bigger is begining to cost to much for younger people to get near.I know Newport and I am sure that allot of the people take the kids sailing but in allot of costal towns young people have to settel for a day at the beach and maybe a rental if you can find a place. They get $650 a day here for a 25 foot sail boat. That is a weeks pay for a huge part of the people who live here.This is the case in allot of the country. California stands alone in its sailing following in my openion.
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  #18  
Old 02-13-2005
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TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough
how do we.....

sailnaway,
Newport, Rhode Island . . . right coast, not left coast, is my home port. Easy mistake, but if you visited the sailnewport.org link I posted, you would have seen that. It is true however, that Newport''s real estate prices are higher than in many areas of the country due to the magnificent shoreline, Narragansett Bay and stately architecture. For the most part, the cost of everything else remains about average.

My responses to the original post pertained to ways in which more young people may become interested in sailing. Aside from having a positive attitude and an "I can do it if I really try" approach to life in general. I see early education/introduction to sail as the best way of doing this.

Most sailors eventually buy a boat and trade up in size to whatever they may be able to afford . . . what and how big is a factor of income and priorities. I agree that boat ownership is expensive, there is no question about it and not everyone is able to afford a cruising lifestyle. However, after many years of owning several powerboats and sailboats of varying sizes (I currently own a 30 ft powerboat and a 36 ft cruising sailboat) I can accurately say, and most would agree, that sailboat purchase & ownership (foot for foot) involves less money. It''s also important to note that powerboats greatly outnumber sailboats in this country. Sailing is a cheaper alternative. Powerboaters jokingly refer to sailboaters as "the cheap fleet".

We all do whatever we need to do to live our dreams. If moving up means going no larger than 25 ft . . . so be it; at least we''re sailing and that''s all that matters.

Steve
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  #19  
Old 02-14-2005
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drmattito is on a distinguished road
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I think one of the best ways to get kids into sailing is to give them the experience. What does this mean? It means volunteering your time and boat to take children sailing.

If you have kids in scouts or school clubs, volunteer to take groups of them out sailing. If you are active in a church, do the same thing.

When out on the water, make sure the children are active participants. Get a few of them to adjust the main sheet and the like. Ask them in what direction they would like to sail. Better yet, if you have a friend with a similar boat, divide the group of kids into teams and get them to race each other.

Take along a parent or two that might have an interest in sailing. Talk to the parents about the ease of buying an older starter boat and the joy of spending time on the water with the kids.

Sometimes all it takes is getting other peoples'' feet wet (no pun intended) to give them the sailing bug.
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  #20  
Old 02-14-2005
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TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough
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Great suggestions drmattito . . . that seems to be the right spirit needed to jumpstart another sail-Renaissance.

Wishful thinking.

Steve
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