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  #11  
Old 01-28-2014
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Re: Condensation inside sailboat...

That mild winter prediction sure has not panned out.
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  #12  
Old 01-28-2014
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Re: Condensation inside sailboat...

I run a dehumidifier, one of the big ones from Lowes, in mine all of the time when she's at the slip. I just run the drain hose to the bilge so the auto bilge pump can take care of it.

It really makes a difference. Especially down here with the high humidity. Without it, mildew will quickly form on everything.
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  #13  
Old 01-28-2014
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Re: Condensation inside sailboat...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
I have never had a condensation problem on my boat in any weather , thanks to an inch and a half of spray foam, despite living aboard in all weather in BC winters. Insulation on everything is the key. A friend ,living on a cement boat, had condensation problems, until he installed a dehumidifier. It took 5 gallons out of the air in ,the first few days, then it tapered off and things began to dry far more quickly. It takes only 2 degrees of temperature difference between the temp of a surface and the air, for condensation to form.
Mike,

Did you install the foam? I am planning to do that to my Islander. I have used the "kits" before. My headliner needs to be replaced so I decided to spray foam the inside and replace the ceilings everywhere. At least down to the wl. My plan is to attach blocks to attach ceilings to and spray. Level the result and then attach the new ceilings. A big job but if the "headliners are going it doesn't make sense to put something up without insulating. Your thoughts?

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  #14  
Old 01-28-2014
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Re: Condensation inside sailboat...

Down.. I'd look at closed cell foam panels rather than spray on esp as a retrofit. Seems it would be hard to control the depth of a spray, esp overhead.

I've used Ensolite in the past for this, glued in place, there are some newer less volatile contact cements now too that may not 'eat' foams, and as a inexpensive option the closed cell sleeping pads tenters use can do a decent job too. I don't think you need a lot of thickness for simple condensation prevention.
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  #15  
Old 01-28-2014
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Re: Condensation inside sailboat...

This would be on how to manage condensation and you don't have a dehumidifier and need to do something right now. This comes from a grade school science project and modified for this purpose.

Plastic attracts moister and dead air space is the best insulator. If you take a piece of plastic tarping, like 4 mill and secure it to the ceiling, I know this will not be easy to do, but if you dry an area and use duct tape, it should hold. It needs to be air tight. Now pitch the plastic with weight on top of the plastic. like a bolt or a small fitting, not too heavy, but heavy enough to pitch the plastic to that point. Yes this will need to be done before sealing the plastic.

Now here is the theory, you are adding a layer of insulation (dead air space) to the ceiling, helping with heat loss and moving the condensation to the underside of the new, tarp, ceiling. The water will condensate here and run down to the weighted point and drip off into...sink or bucket.

I know this is OT to the OPs post, but I thought it might help others here.
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Re: Condensation inside sailboat...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
Down.. I'd look at closed cell foam panels rather than spray on esp as a retrofit. Seems it would be hard to control the depth of a spray, esp overhead.

I've used Ensolite in the past for this, glued in place, there are some newer less volatile contact cements now too that may not 'eat' foams, and as a inexpensive option the closed cell sleeping pads tenters use can do a decent job too. I don't think you need a lot of thickness for simple condensation prevention.
Faster,

That is good advice and I may decide to do it with Ensolite. I have used the spray and it is tricky and messy. The timing is important, too. It would almost need to be a "one and done" operation which means the entire interior gets trashed at once. Ensolite would allow it to be done in smaller stages. I appreciate your observations. Thanks.

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Re: Condensation inside sailboat...

Quote:
Originally Posted by nramsey View Post
Brent,

Does the insulation stop condensation on the hull below the waterline?

Neil
Yes absolutely. She is foamed right down to the floor boards. It is not wise to go below the floor boards, or it will act as a wick. Insulating the bottom of the floor boards works well, as does putting a carpet down for the winter, That reduces condensation in the bilge by over 80%. Pulling out enough interior in a plastic boat to sprayfoam the interior, then putting it back after, is a huge job. But your improvement in comfort level from that point on is equally huge.
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Re: Condensation inside sailboat...

Quote:
Originally Posted by downeast450 View Post
Mike,

Did you install the foam? I am planning to do that to my Islander. I have used the "kits" before. My headliner needs to be replaced so I decided to spray foam the inside and replace the ceilings everywhere. At least down to the wl. My plan is to attach blocks to attach ceilings to and spray. Level the result and then attach the new ceilings. A big job but if the "headliners are going it doesn't make sense to put something up without insulating. Your thoughts?

Down
I hired a sprayfoamer to do it, in a couple of hours. Friends have used the kits, and had no problem with them, but they are not really that much cheaper than having someone do it for you. Friends, who tried sheet foam ,found it a huge amount of work, and no cheaper than having it sprayfoamed. Sprayfoam can also eliminate the little bits of fibreglass or steel poking thru, each of which will drip condensation like a leaky faucet.
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Re: Condensation inside sailboat...

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Originally Posted by caberg View Post
That mild winter prediction sure has not panned out.
It has sure panned out here in BC, with one of the mildest, driest winters in history. Much foggier tho. I wonder if this crazy jet stream pattern will become far more common, with climate change.
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Re: Condensation inside sailboat...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
I hired a sprayfoamer to do it, in a couple of hours. Friends have used the kits, and had no problem with them, but they are not really that much cheaper than having someone do it for you. Friends, who tried sheet foam ,found it a huge amount of work, and no cheaper than having it sprayfoamed. Sprayfoam can also eliminate the little bits of fibreglass or steel poking thru, each of which will drip condensation like a leaky faucet.
Thanks Brent. I will see if it makes sense to foam. There are spaces that sure would be more effectively insulated with a spray application. I have applied a small kit to another boat so I am familiar with the application problems. My biggest concern as a retrofit is the complete "insult" to the interior it will require. Your point about uninsulated places providing "drip sources" is a good one. I have decided I need to replace this boats ceilings (headliner) and that will require a lot of disruption anyway? We will see.

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