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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #21  
Old 10-27-2013
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Re: Fishing

It really seems true that it's more difficult to catch fish from a sailboat than a powerboat. I've never been able to figure out why. Trolling too fast has something to do with it when moving along but even when drifting through an obvious school of fish, jigging it seems like sailboats are fish repellent:-) I hooked a big tuna (pretty sure it was a tuna) off S. Carolina, about 40-50 miles out a few months ago (white NoAlibi) and didn't need to cut the line. It stripped the line off a large spinning reel and snapped it in seconds, like hooking a freight train! Was trying to catch a small one for dinner just outside the Gulf Stream.
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  #22  
Old 10-27-2013
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Re: Fishing

I like to fish a bit while sailing but opt for a pole instead of a hand line.



ATB

Michael
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  #23  
Old 10-27-2013
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Re: Fishing

Quote:
Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
That's my plan. I have gaff set up to haul up with our outboard motor lift. I think I can fillet a fish over the transom so cleaning the mess off teak decks won't be such a chore.

Of course this is all theoretical as apparently I can't fish worth a darn. I dragged a lure across the entire Atlantic Ocean and caught nothing. With two handlines, a bunch of line, a goodly assortment of lures, a squirt bottle of cheap Swedish vodka, a couple of gaffs, and other odds and ends the first fish I do manage to catch will be far from free. *sigh*
Well that is the problem, what self respecting fish is going to take the offer of cheap vodka? Offer some good high end tequila or a nice white wine, and they will jump into the cockpit without even throwing out a line out! Remember Starkist is looking for tuna with good taste according to Charlie.
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  #24  
Old 10-27-2013
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Re: Fishing

The secret to cleaning any fish, big or small, is having a razor sharp fillet knife, preferably one with a blade of 9 to 11 inches minimum. This makes life a lot easier. The best fillet knife I've ever owned was electric and made by Mister Twister. I just plugged it into the inverter and slab filleted the fish, then flipped the fillets over and slid the skin off. The tip of the knife is pointed and allows you to pare the belly bones away with a single swipe.

As for the taste of blue marlin, it's very strong and oily, however, when brined and smoked the fillets are pretty darned good. White marlin, however, is far superior when brined and smoked using hickory chips.

Here's the best brine recipe I have, one that took me years to perfect:

2 qts. Water
1 cup dark brown sugar
4 tblsp. Old Bay Seafood Seasoning
4 tblsp. chopped, fresh Vidalia onions
˝ cup kosher salt
1 tsp. garlic powder
1 tblsp. Montreal steak seasoning
6 drops Worcestershire sauce
1 tblsp. lemon juice

DIRECTIONS:
Thoroughly mix all ingredients of brine solution in a plastic container until salt and sugar are completely dissolved. Using a flat, Tupperware container pour in a small amount of brine solution (about one-inch deep). Cut fish fillets into inch-thick, four-inch squares and place them in the container in layers. After the first layer is in place, pour in enough brine solution to cover them, then add the second layer and continue until all the fillets are covered with brine. Cover the container using a sealable lid or Saran Wrap and refrigerate for five days. Be sure to agitate the container at least once daily to prevent the brine ingredients from settling–this is important. If there are several layers of fillets, it's also a good idea to occasionally separate them at least once daily to ensure all surfaces are exposed to the brine.

Enjoy,

Gary
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  #25  
Old 10-27-2013
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Re: Fishing

Well Gary there is no way I would any billfish into my cockpit. In fact I am leary of boating anything over 30lbs as sometimes they go into a final desperate thrash and can do damage. A wahoo of about 80lbs virtually destroyed my cockpit on my previous boat. Mind you I did some of the damage as I thought it was a big cuda and was up on the gunnel whacking away with the gaff!

All my fish are caught on handlines and if I get something heavy then I will use a winch. Leather gardening gloves are a must though.

Mostly I get small tuna and dorado though.
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  #26  
Old 10-27-2013
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Thumbs up Re: Fishing

Quote:
Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
The secret to cleaning any fish, big or small, is having a razor sharp fillet knife, preferably one with a blade of 9 to 11 inches minimum. This makes life a lot easier. The best fillet knife I've ever owned was electric and made by Mister Twister. I just plugged it into the inverter and slab filleted the fish, then flipped the fillets over and slid the skin off. The tip of the knife is pointed and allows you to pare the belly bones away with a single swipe.

As for the taste of blue marlin, it's very strong and oily, however, when brined and smoked the fillets are pretty darned good. White marlin, however, is far superior when brined and smoked using hickory chips.

Here's the best brine recipe I have, one that took me years to perfect:

2 qts. Water
1 cup dark brown sugar
4 tblsp. Old Bay Seafood Seasoning
4 tblsp. chopped, fresh Vidalia onions
˝ cup kosher salt
1 tsp. garlic powder
1 tblsp. Montreal steak seasoning
6 drops Worcestershire sauce
1 tblsp. lemon juice

DIRECTIONS:
Thoroughly mix all ingredients of brine solution in a plastic container until salt and sugar are completely dissolved. Using a flat, Tupperware container pour in a small amount of brine solution (about one-inch deep). Cut fish fillets into inch-thick, four-inch squares and place them in the container in layers. After the first layer is in place, pour in enough brine solution to cover them, then add the second layer and continue until all the fillets are covered with brine. Cover the container using a sealable lid or Saran Wrap and refrigerate for five days. Be sure to agitate the container at least once daily to prevent the brine ingredients from settling–this is important. If there are several layers of fillets, it's also a good idea to occasionally separate them at least once daily to ensure all surfaces are exposed to the brine.

Enjoy,

Gary
That sounds delicious Gary. Adding your recipe to my fish cookbook!
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  #27  
Old 10-27-2013
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Re: Fishing

Several years ago, when I was still fishing the confines of Chesapeake Bay's lower reaches on a regular basis, I would return with a cooler chest filled with 3 to 4-pound croaker. Atlantic croaker are pretty oily, but at one time were the mainstay of the bay's recreational angling community and charter fishing industry. I quickly discovered that my cat wouldn't touch them served fresh, my wife hated the oily taste and texture when they were broiled or pan fried, but smoked, they were out of this world. Same was true with bluefish, which at one time were used as fertilizer. Most oily species of fish lend themselves well to smoking, while light whitemeat fish do not. That's why you rarely see smoked flounder, striped bass, grouper or snapper. But smoked king mackerel, salmon, Spanish mackerel, croaker, marlin, dolphin, wahoo are all outstanding, especially using the above brine recipe.

Good Luck,

Gary
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  #28  
Old 01-19-2014
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Re: Fishing

Great thread. Seems there are four types of fishing.
At anchor- here can use rod/ reel in conventional way. With some forethought and a sugar scoop even some limited fly fishing
Coastal and underway. Just don't want to do this near reefs. May get sick from fish.
Meat fishing on passage.
Haven't tried yo yo s yet. But seems interesting.
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  #29  
Old 01-19-2014
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Re: Fishing

Yo yo will work, but it does not provide you with the advantages of using a rod and reel, even while trolling. The Yo Yo is just something to hold the line and doesn't take up the space of a rod and reel. However, it does not have the sensitivity, hook setting ability or drag system of even the cheapest rod and reel system. If you want to consistently catch fish, even under the worst conditions, you need a rod and reel. This alone, however, will not put fish in the cooler chest. You need to learn about fishing various forms of structure, how to read the water, how to locate the structure on your charts, correct bait presentation, types of bait for specific species, feeding habits of the species, temperature comfort zones for each species, and more. Fishing isn't just a matter of tossing a bait or lure overboard and a fish jumps on your offering and commits suicide - it's an skill that requires a fair degree of study to be successful. More so than sailing. It's far more complex than most people realize. Granted, there are times when the fish seem to be jumping in the boat, but those situations are indeed rare. The best advice I would have for someone just starting out would be for them to go fishing with a licensed charter fishing captain and learn as much from that trip as you can. Ask questions, take notes, and learn why and how this individual is successful. It can be well worth the time and effort, and you should have a lot of fun in the process.

Gary
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Old 01-19-2014
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Re: Fishing

Currently have a ugly stick; cheap surf rod; and a9 wt. within hands reach. One set up at home; one in the truck and one on the boat. Figure fish don't know how much money you spent on stuff. Save the good stuff for streams.
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