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  #1221  
Old 03-02-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdogandy View Post
Would the empty glass jars have any trade / barter value in the Bahamas or Caribbean?
can't imagine that they would.
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  #1222  
Old 03-02-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

I like frozen vegetables a lot better than canned ones. Plus I like to buy things like chicken in bulk when they are on sale and put them in vacuum packed bags and freeze them as they last a lot longer.

One of the reasons I believe that having a freezer/refrigeration is a cost saver in the long run!
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  #1223  
Old 03-02-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

Quote:
Originally Posted by mrhoneydew View Post
I really like the idea of home canning, but I'm just a little nervous about having so much glass aboard. Anyone else? Sure you can stow it securely, but at some point you have to bring it out to consume it and that increases the risk of breakage. Broken glass on a boat is bad news. Are there any alternatives to glass? Can anything be done to the jar to contain it if it does break? I'm thinking something like dipping it in clear silicone, or wrapping the whole thing in Saran Wrap (as much as I can't stand excessive use of disposable plastics)...
Fear of broken glass stops when you have a vacuum aboard. You can get an inverter (very useful for many other things) and then get a mini shop vac at Home Depot. Just like at home, when glass breaks pick up the big pieces and thoroughly vacuum the entire area and beyond.

I'm getting rid of our plastic glasses and going all glass. For one thing, the plastic makes a glass of Amaretto taste horrible, like it's leaching chemicals into the alcohol.

And we now keep a couple frosted beer glasses in the freezer. If you don't believe me, come by and we'll test them out.

Regards,
Brad
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  #1224  
Old 03-02-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

I am currently buying in bulk (as food comes on sale), then drying and vacuum bagging for long-term storage. I can store huge volumes of food in a very small space, and it will last for years if properly sealed. I see our fridge/freezer as a useful tool, but more for short/medium term storage of food (meat, leftovers, excess caught fish, beer!).

As has been discussed, most fresh veggies and fruits don't require refrigeration. And for bulk buying, you'd need a very large fridge to store any serious volumes of veg or fruit. As a comparison, I just dried approx. two dozen fresh tomatoes. Fresh, they occupied the size of standard grocery bag. All dried and sealed, they are now the size of a can of beans. Best of all, they'll last for years if need be, will retain most of their nutritional value, and will taste nearly as good as fresh.
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  #1225  
Old 03-02-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

Canned stuff lasts an incredibly long time...YEARS, as long as you keep the cans from rusting. I just finished some canned tuna and pineapple that I bought at least three years ago...still perfectly good.
$500/mo. is dreaming. One moderate mechanical, electronic, or rigging setback can blow that idea in a couple of seconds. Just simple maintenance will take a large bite out of that amount. Insurance? Fuel? Tow service? Once you have a well found boat to start with, maybe it could be done for $1000 or so if you don't mind rice, beans, and oatmeal all the time and never pay for dockage or moorings (where you can take a shower occasionally). That doesn't sound like a whole lot of fun. What are you going to do if the engine has a major episode needing replacement to the tune of 10Gs? A line item in any budget has to be enough to cover the worst contingency.
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  #1226  
Old 03-02-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

Smurf, never had a can rust out on the boat - ever. I had a can of Ravioli that was inadvertently shoved into the back of the bar, behind all the booze bottles. It was there for two years and not a speck of rust.

Gary
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  #1227  
Old 03-02-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

Quote:
Originally Posted by barefootnavigator View Post
I don't know where this fits in but Fritos are my number one toxic treat, still only three ingredients, corn, salt, oil. Ounce for ounce they have more calories than any other food? The salt is great after a long day in the sun and the scoops, each one will burn for several minutes, making them a great fire starter. At 2 bucks a bag I always have a dozen bags. We almost froze to death at a friends off grid wilderness cabin deep in the heart of winter but one Frito made fire out of a pile of dense wet wood and saved us all.

Even wet wood is usually dry on the inside. Driftwood can make a colorful fire -- the salts & sands create interesting effects.

Steel-wool pads hold a hot spark quite a while; don't use the soapy ones, they stink. Finer grade wool is better.

The inside hairy part of a coconut husk makes great tinder when you fluff it out; split coconut husks make for a really hot fire. The dry ribs of palm fronds are also good fire making stuff.

NEVER PUT A WHOLE COCONUT IN A FIRE. IT WILL EXPLODE.

Rather than a saw or axe/hatchet, I prefer a bolo, like these:



I got mine as a thank-you from one of my wheelchair-repair customers many years ago. It was made from a truck spring in WW II, with water-buffalo-horn handle & buffalo-hide sheath. It's a thick, full-tang blade, holds an edge like nothing I've ever seen, and can go through just about anything. It's my go-to knife for yard work, hurricane cleanup & bbq firewood. It's great for cleaning coconuts, whether fixing a green nut for drinking the water, husking ripe nuts to get at the meat, or splitting old dried nuts for fire.
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  #1228  
Old 03-03-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lou452 View Post
I have a question ? I have been reading about but have never done any careening. My understanding is when the tide comes back is the risky part and some boats Slosh around and then will flood down the companion way and not get up.
How do you know what kind of boat will rise up without damage ? How do you anchor or rig for success ?
Thanks , Lou
Fore and aft anchor, get the boat to lie parallel to he beach as the tide recedes. halyard to lee on a small anchor to get the lean started. Boat leans over very slowly as the tide goes out, position sand bags to cushion the hull. Before the tide comes back in, walk out the fore anchor to seward, take up some tension, as the tide comes in keep pulling in on the rode. She'll straighten right up as the tide rises. We worried about the flooding as well, so put in the bin boards and closed her up tight. not a drop of water on deck....
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Life is a short journey, filled with emptiness and pain. Get all the sailing and booty you can.
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  #1229  
Old 03-03-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigdogandy View Post
Would the empty glass jars have any trade / barter value in the Bahamas or Caribbean?
Mason jars for the bar to serve beer in?
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  #1230  
Old 03-03-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

Quote:
Originally Posted by manatee View Post
Steel-wool pads hold a hot spark quite a while; don't use the soapy ones, they stink. Finer grade wool is better.

The inside hairy part of a coconut husk makes great tinder when you fluff it out; split coconut husks make for a really hot fire. The dry ribs of palm fronds are also good fire making stuff.

Rather than a saw or axe/hatchet, I prefer a bolo, like these:

Steel wool is great. Up here, dry moss and birchbark is the thing. I look forward to trying the coconut husks (no coconuts anywhere near here). BTW, I love your blades. A versatile tool, no doubt. Even good for the bears . But for managing cooking wood (i.e. small pieces), it's hard to beat a light, strong folding saw like this one.

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