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  #1271  
Old 03-06-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

Another topic I am wondering about, on an extended cruise if you're going remote how do some of you get potable water? I had considered a watermaker, but then decided it's too much expense and yet one more system to potentially fail. Not that it is necessarily hard to come by water, but how do y'all collect it? I am thinking I want to be as self-sufficient as possible and in places like, say, the South Pacific we might be taking water supplies from islanders who have no other means of collecting it than rainfall. So, do you rig tarps to collect when it's raining? Also, who has cooked their pasta/beans/rice in seawater? Do you typically cut it with fresh water or no?
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  #1272  
Old 03-06-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

[QUOTE=guitarguy56;1597193]My son just now turned me onto this incredible water filtration idea as he was researching for one of his classes... definitely something that could be used here and elsewhere. I wonder if this would remove salt... further investigation needed.

I like the concept. As it appears in the picture I am not sure would work? It might be a type of wood that would allow flow ? You can use wood as a plug. to me this looks like a plug. Wood even has the ability to swell up and make the plug tighter. You can sharpen an end to dive it into a thru hull the has broken off or a hole in a pipe or maybe the hull itself.
Their are some good home made U- tube clips on water filtration. one of them used a two litter pop bottle a few sizes of rocks sand and grass with homemade charcoal . The fire that makes the charcoal can also can be used to boil the water you filter. An Egyptian well can be used before you start if you can not find moving water.
I thought we covered water filtration once already ? Never hurts to go over a important subject a few times.
kind Regards, Lou

Last edited by Lou452; 03-06-2014 at 12:17 AM.
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  #1273  
Old 03-06-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by Lou452 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by guitarguy56 View Post
My son just now turned me onto this incredible water filtration idea as he was researching for one of his classes... definitely something that could be used here and elsewhere. I wonder if this would remove salt... further investigation needed.
I like the concept. As it appears in the picture I am not sure would work? It might be a type of wood that would allow flow ? You can use wood as a plug. to me this looks like a plug. Wood even has the ability to swell up and make the plug tighter. You can sharpen an end to dive it into a thru hull the has broken off or a hole in a pipe or maybe the hull itself.
Their are some good home made U- tube clips on water filtration. one of them used a two litter pop bottle a few sizes of rocks sand and grass with homemade charcoal . The fire that makes the charcoal can also can be used to boil the water you filter. An Egyptian well can be used before you start if you can not find moving water.
I thought we covered water filtration once already ? Never hurts to go over a important subject a few times.
kind Regards, Lou
Read the article just below the photo... apparently the lab setup test they did had purity tests of 99.9% of drinkable water... now I just found that using 'graphene' in the form of nano-carbons can filter out the salines from seawater and purify to R/O or better purification.

The concept above is being researched for purifying water in third world countries as an alternative to electrical energy based systems and are more gravity type pressure systems with the filter at the end... I'm thinking more a purification type setup for rain water collected on the boat either for drinking or other uses I would not want to use seawater.
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  #1274  
Old 03-06-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
Here's the best one on Cholesterol mythology. Cholesterol and Heart Disease - YouTube

Gary
I wish there were more skeptics regarding all kinds of popular "truths" that society accepts. The problem is with the tyranny of academia and the selective nature of statistical methods. The "studies" that confirm and deny popular beliefs are always done by "researchers" who have vested interests in proving their hypotheses. When politically motivated news media picks up on something that fits their political agenda, all truth goes out the window.
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  #1275  
Old 03-06-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by mrhoneydew View Post
Another topic I am wondering about, on an extended cruise if you're going remote how do some of you get potable water? I had considered a watermaker, but then decided it's too much expense and yet one more system to potentially fail. Not that it is necessarily hard to come by water, but how do y'all collect it? I am thinking I want to be as self-sufficient as possible and in places like, say, the South Pacific we might be taking water supplies from islanders who have no other means of collecting it than rainfall. So, do you rig tarps to collect when it's raining? Also, who has cooked their pasta/beans/rice in seawater? Do you typically cut it with fresh water or no?
Like most things, it depends. You have to consider two things, the quantity of water and the quality. If you go into the South Pacific do not assume that you are going into some necessarily primitive society. The best water we have gotten anywhere in the world including North America was on the island of Mangareva in a backwater of French Polynesia. Came from a spring high up a volcanic mountain and then was treated before being piped to the town (pop'n of 1200 or so). Was free, just had to carry it from a tap to the dinghy dock (~100 m). You do want to have a couple of water jerry cans onboard. Some places you have to buy water and it will not be all that cheap. On Ascension Island the water was 1 pound sterling for a jerry can. In some areas there is water but it may be of dubious quality.

We have a couple of sections of plastic rain gutter onboard that we can attach to the outer edges of the bimini with plastic tubing going into one of our jerry cans. We use this water mainly for washing but have dumped them into the main tanks after a few hours of rain (we use bleach and two filters on the house water). Not sure these are worth the trouble or space involved. We are planning to build a rigid bimini and will include a combined hand rail/rain collector onto it.
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  #1276  
Old 03-06-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
I wish there were more skeptics regarding all kinds of popular "truths" that society accepts. The problem is with the tyranny of academia and the selective nature of statistical methods. The "studies" that confirm and deny popular beliefs are always done by "researchers" who have vested interests in proving their hypotheses. When politically motivated news media picks up on something that fits their political agenda, all truth goes out the window.
Scientists are as human as the rest of us (believe it or not ). They are as fallible and as open to bias as the rest of us. What sets science apart is that it is a self-correcting process that inexorably drive toward better understanding. That's why it is important not to jump to conclusions with regard to scientific research, or worse, latch onto any one piece of information or study and use it to promote a perspective.

This is the bigger problem I see ... that people with a perspective or belief cherry-pick specific scientific development to "prove" their point. While there are certainly some researchers who have been bought by special interests, the real problem is that most people don't understand how science works, or in the more egregious cases (tobacco smoking, climate change, etc.) people who blatantly abuse science for their own political or economic purposes.
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  #1277  
Old 03-06-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
We have a couple of sections of plastic rain gutter onboard that we can attach to the outer edges of the bimini with plastic tubing going into one of our jerry cans. We use this water mainly for washing but have dumped them into the main tanks after a few hours of rain (we use bleach and two filters on the house water). Not sure these are worth the trouble or space involved. We are planning to build a rigid bimini and will include a combined hand rail/rain collector onto it.
I've been planning to carry something like this so I can set it up to collect rain:



I've also read about people collecting rainwater from their sails. Any luck or advice around that KS?
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  #1278  
Old 03-06-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
"researchers" who have vested interests in proving their hypotheses.
Researchers have to research only what they are able to get grants for.
For instance an expert can't research "Kangaroos and how they hop" but to get funding must make it politically acceptable: "Global Warming may make kangaroos Extinct because it changes Hopping".
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  #1279  
Old 03-06-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by MikeOReilly View Post
Scientists are as human as the rest of us (believe it or not ). They are as fallible and as open to bias as the rest of us. What sets science apart is that it is a self-correcting process that inexorably drive toward better understanding. That's why it is important not to jump to conclusions with regard to scientific research, or worse, latch onto any one piece of information or study and use it to promote a perspective.

This is the bigger problem I see ... that people with a perspective or belief cherry-pick specific scientific development to "prove" their point. While there are certainly some researchers who have been bought by special interests, the real problem is that most people don't understand how science works, or in the more egregious cases (tobacco smoking, climate change, etc.) people who blatantly abuse science for their own political or economic purposes.
I believe the overwhelming majority of scientists are honestly doing what they perceive as the search for scientific truth. They just don't seem to appreciate the very elusive nature of truth because, like scientists throughout history, they believe they know more than they actually do. It's a case of misplaced egocentric behavior. Those in academia are also severely pressured to accept certain truths as a prerequisite to keeping their jobs. This is true in all fields of academic study, not just science. It is a major unconscious failing of human nature; that tribal, monkey-like group-think that impedes progress and causes all kinds of terrible strife.
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  #1280  
Old 03-06-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by smurphny View Post
I believe the overwhelming majority of scientists are honestly doing what they perceive as the search for scientific truth. They just don't seem to appreciate the very elusive nature of truth because, like scientists throughout history, they believe they know more than they actually do. It's a case of misplaced egocentric behavior. Those in academia are also severely pressured to accept certain truths as a prerequisite to keeping their jobs. This is true in all fields of academic study, not just science. It is a major unconscious failing of human nature; that tribal, monkey-like group-think that impedes progress and causes all kinds of terrible strife.
That's the power of science. It is self-correcting process that drives to improved understanding regardless of our species' fallibilities. Individual researchers can be capricious, stupid or corrupt. The amazing thing about science is that, in the medium to long term, it doesn't matter. The process of science will eventually drive to improved understandings.

BTW, no good scientist ever talks about Truth with a capital "T". The best science can do is arrive at contingent truths. That too is a fundamental difference from past paradigms of understanding. Science relies of reproducible evidence, not reference to authority. Science it ripe with false starts and faulty branches, but eventually evidence mounts to halt or change the contingent understanding.

This does not mean nothing in science is concrete. As hypothesis continue to stand the constant challenges put to them, they eventually move to the level of scientific theory. Scientific theories are not someone's kooky idea, they are concepts that are as near to certain as any knowledge can be.

This is why I think science (which is a process, not a thing) is the most amazing development to come out of homosapien evolution. Despite all our inherent limitations, our "monkey-like group-think" as you put it, we have devised a process that still produces improved understanding of the world around us.

... sorry for the tangent. Now, back to frugal cruising.
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Last edited by MikeOReilly; 03-06-2014 at 11:20 AM.
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