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  #1491  
Old 03-24-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by Bene505 View Post
I'm about spend $450 recovering 1 leather cushion. That's almost a whole month's cruising budget on this thread.

It's the end cushion where the nav station is, and it takes the most abuse. I tried using a couple Priceclub fabric cushions, but they were flimsy, didn't match, and overall added very little value.

Any suggestions? Yes, I bought a sewing maching but have no idea how to use it, and don't have the time right now to learn with work and spring prep.

Regards,
Brad
I use Sampson for cushion covers, with plywood bottoms. It's 3 oz dacron saturated with PVC. Tough and cheap. You just wrap it over your padding and staple it to the bottoms of the plywood. Takes minutes to make up your cushions that way.
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  #1492  
Old 03-24-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by MikeOReilly View Post
Hi Steve, I'll take a stab here. I'll first say there are better resources in the form of books (Annie Hill, many Pardey books) which go through this kind of stuff in detail. There are probably online resources as well that can be more systematic.

When we cruise we're usually out for four to six weeks at a time. Here's what I've learned.
  • In general, the tougher the veggie or fruit the longer it will last.
  • Potatoes, carrots, turnips, radishes, onions, garlic, parsnip, fennel, etc. all last a long time.
  • Cabbage lasts over a month, and is a wonderful food for everything from soups to sandwiches. It's a great substitute for lettuce.
  • Tomatoes last for weeks as long as they're protected from bruising.
  • Same with citrus (oranges, grapefruit), and apples, especially the harder ones like Granny Smith. The higher sugary ones like Macintosh go off faster, but will still last for two weeks.
  • Bell peppers do not last long (days, maybe a week). Neither does cucumber or any delicate leafy lettuces. Spinach on the stem will last for a days to a week.
  • I've never taken melons, but I would expect them to be ok for a week or so, as long as they're protected from bruising.
You mention meats; obviously fresh meat won't last long, but dried and cured meats (sausage, jerky, dried meet mixes) will last a long time. I dry ground beef and it will last years if kept sealed.

Hard cheeses last a long time, but not the soft cheeses. You know about eggs. What else... ?
Cover any hard cheese in a jar with cooking oil and it will last forever. You can still use the oil for cooking.
I once bought 15 dozen eggs and greased them for a trip to the Marquesas. Turned the whole carton over every few days. After three months, mostly in the tropics, 10 out of every dozen were still good.
Buy a canner and learn to can your own meat and fish. Then you can stock up when hunting and fishing are good ,or some farmer wants to get rid of his old hens, who are no longer laying. They get real cheap then, sometimes free. I've canned my share
No body wants them because that are tough but canning eliminates that problem.
Refrigeration is far more complicated and failure prone than keeping dry things dry, or canning, which doesn't need a constant source of energy.
The Namgeese tribe in Kingcome inlet used refrigeration for their salmon. When flooding cut the power, it all rotted . Even the grizzlies wouldn't touch it.
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Last edited by Brent Swain; 03-24-2014 at 03:15 PM.
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  #1493  
Old 03-24-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

There seems to be a lot of good information at the 'The National Center for Home Food Preservation' ( nchfp.uga.edu ) National Center for Home Food Preservation[/url] . U of Georgia, Alabama and others. (I can't post full links yet. I'm sure you'll find it.)
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  #1494  
Old 03-24-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

Having personally tasted just about every canned meat and fish product available, including some that were done locally by folks using special, time-tested recipes, I can unequivocally assure you that nearly all tasted somewhat like doggy doo! Canned fish, in particular, is really bad. And, for the most part, it pretty much smells bad as well. I'll take fresh or frozen every day of the week. And, because we're out cruising around on relatively slow-moving boats, often in near-shore waters, we have an excellent opportunity to catch lots of great tasting, fresh fish on a daily basis.

Most of the canned meats I've taste tested have been mediocre at best. Spam has never been among my favorites, though while in the Navy I had to learn to love it or starve. Canned sausages just don't cut it - ever. Now, I do enjoy canned, smoked hams, but that's not something I will be doing myself. Besides, Hormel has this down to a science and really does a great job and sells it for a low price. Surely, no one in their right mind would can venison, or beef. Ugh!

Canned chicken and turkey breasts are inexpensive and very, very good. You can use this in place of tuna for making a tuna-salad sandwich, add a little Old Bay Seafood Seasoning, some sweet pickled relish, mayonnaise and wow! It' pretty darned good. And it will last a long time in the refrigerator after it has been prepared.

Smoked fish and meats will last a long, long time in the refrigerator or freezer, and I have a great electric smoker here at home and a 50-pound bag of hickory chips. I've been smoking fish for more than 3 decades, my friends and family love it, and smoked fish used in place of canned tuna for fish salad sandwiches is out of this world. My personal favorites are salmon (of course), bluefish, Atlantic croaker, mahi, king mackerel, cero mackerel and Spanish mackerel. Oily species tend to be best for smoking, while species such as striped bass, catfish, bluegill, largemouth bass and pike do lend themselves well to this process. Those are best served fresh, either baked, broiled or fried. Lobster and shrimp do not work well for smoking and canning as well. Fortunately, non-oily species will freeze for extended periods when frozen in zip-lock bags filled with fresh water and retain their quality for months on end.

Smoked venison is pretty darned good as well. It makes great venison jerky, and a smoked venison roast sliced paper thin makes incredible Philly Cheese-steak subs.

Smoked venison sausage, especially sweet Italian style, is outstanding. Lots of great recipes on the Internet for this. It also makes great Kielbasa too. Just don't put it in a can or jar - much better fresh or frozen.

Here's my recipe for Smoked Salmon:

SMOKED SALMON

There are lots of good recipes for smoked salmon. Unfortunately, there are not many great recipes for smoked fish, but this particular one seems to be the best of all. After more than five years of experimentation, using every species of fish available in the mid-Atlantic region, the recipe has been modified until it has finally reached the pinnacle of perfection. If you enjoy the flavor of smoked fish, especially oily species such as salmon, bluefish, Atlantic mackerel, king mackerel and cobia, you'll love this.

BRINE SOLUTION
2 qts. Water
1 cup dark brown sugar
4 tblsp. Old Bay Seafood Seasoning
4 tblsp. chopped, fresh Vidalia onions
˝ cup kosher salt
1 tsp. garlic powder
1 tblsp. Montreal steak seasoning
6 drops Worcestershire sauce
1 tblsp. lemon juice

DIRECTIONS:
Thoroughly mix all ingredients of brine solution in a plastic container until salt and sugar are completely dissolved. Using a flat, Tupperware container pour in a small amount of bring solution (about one-inch deep). Cut fish fillets into inch-thick, four-inch squares and place them in the container in layers. After the first layer is in place, pour in enough brine solution to cover them, then add the second layer and continue until all the fillets are covered with brine. Cover the container using a sealable lid or Saran Wrap and refrigerate for five days. Be sure to agitate the container at least once daily to prevent the brine ingredients from settling–this is important. If there are several layers of fillets, it's also a good idea to occasionally separate them at least once daily to ensure all surfaces are exposed to the brine.

At the end of the brining period, remove the fillets and pat dry with paper towels. Place them on a broiler pan sprayed with Pam non-stick vegetable oil and bake in a 350-degree, preheated oven for 25 minutes, then place the fillets in the smoker. Using an electric smoker, smoke for approximately two hours using hickory chips. When the fillets are golden brown in color, remove them from the smoker, allow a few minutes for them to cool, then place them in Zip-Loc bags and refrigerate overnight before serving. While they taste good fresh from the smoker, the hickory flavor penetrates the meat completely when refrigerated in air-tight bags. The smoked fillets will last up to six weeks in the refrigerator and may be frozen for up to three months. Smoked fillets can be shredded and used with your favorite dip, or you can make a fantastic smoked salmon salad to be used as a substitute for tuna-salad. Enjoy!

Cheers,

Gary
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  #1495  
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by travlineasy View Post
Surely, no one in their right mind would can venison, or beef. Ugh!
I have to disagree with you on a lot of what you wrote about canned meat trav, but especially this.

Canned hamburger is great.
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

I buy meat and can it myself. Also I learned how to dry pork meat, it is really a money-saver.
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  #1497  
Old 03-25-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by Brent Swain View Post
It was non stop from Tonga to BC , 5,000 miles , 4,000 of it against super squally trade winds, with a tropical storm thrown in for variety. There were few other options for getting home quickly. Australia is closer to 7,000 miles. 3420 wont get you to the Marquesas. As I left the first of april ,the trades were far more northerly than they were previously ,on the same trip in july, which had far more southerlies.
No, a sailboat doesn't sail the rumb line against the trades ,with a tropical storm in the mix! Jet plane travellers dont get that part.
Nice to avoid the super expensive food in French Polynesia, or New Caledonia, by bringing your own , or avoiding eating nothing much but coconuts, rice, fish and local fruit on Fanning. Not much else available there.
Sorry, my mistake, your posts leave the clear impression that you're a seasoned voyager, not one given to making the sort of choices that the described voyage includes.

So like I said, voyage of choice. You must have worked hard not to hit Hawaii.
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  #1498  
Old 03-25-2014
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by Sashav View Post
I buy meat and can it myself. Also I learned how to dry pork meat, it is really a money-saver.
I dry other meats, but I've never dried pork. How do you do it? Same as any jerky, or do you do something else with it?
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

dont try and make serrano ham! jajaja
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Re: Voyaging on $500 per month

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Originally Posted by christian.hess View Post
dont try and make serrano ham! jajaja
That's right Christian... not unless you have acorn-fed Ibérico Bellota pigs... otherwise the taste is never going to be as intense... it's no wonder these hams can fetch upwards of $60-100 per pound... and why it's razor thin sliced at deli's where it's sold. One shop in Barcelona we tried several varieties of Iberico hams and the costliest ham melted in your mouth... worth going just for the samples alone! That with some tempranillo wine is out of this world.

Christian knows...
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