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  #151  
Old 03-05-2014
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Re: What stops Americans cruising the world?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
One thing I don't believe has been noted, yet: We Yanks truly fear the prospect of Med-mooring... :-)
that's good...
i really never thought about it, probably because i learned sailing in the overcrowded med...

i only felt once a bit uncomfortable... that was in hydra, creece where we arrived late and had to raft up in the fourth row...
it was just that little bit too much and rather awkward to go over 3 foredecks just to get to the mooring - i felt a wee bit like an intruder...
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  #152  
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Re: What stops Americans cruising the world?

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Originally Posted by capt vimes View Post
that's good...
i really never thought about it, probably because i learned sailing in the overcrowded med...

i only felt once a bit uncomfortable... that was in hydra, creece where we arrived late and had to raft up in the fourth row...
it was just that little bit too much and rather awkward to go over 3 foredecks just to get to the mooring - i felt a wee bit like an intruder...
Being British we to are not used to med mooring, We moor alongside pontoons as does Atlantic and Northern France.
We did not even think about it before we set off.
We like our personal space which we do not think we have lost. What we have gained is so many good friends which is more important.

If you worry about being rafted 4 out try Honfleur, France in the summer where we were the eight out on a raft. We knew we would be rafted out but if we had not gone we would have missed one of the most beautiful harbours in France. It is something no one with a chance of going should miss.
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  #153  
Old 03-05-2014
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Re: What stops Americans cruising the world?

Rather that try to deduce why others haven't done it, here's my personal story. I looked seriously at crossing and doing the Med twice, once 30 years ago and again 5 years ago. Owned a well found 40 footer both times, and had sailed direct from Long Island to the Caribbean and back several times. Decided against it because my perception of the actual sailing in the Med was that it's often fluky, expensive and crowded, and has a shortish season.

We like Europe, but with friends and relatives living there, it's just a lot easier and cheaper to fly and drive/take the train. There are certainly great spots that I'd love to take my boat (especially in "shoulder season"), but it didn't seem like the best choice.

For that matter, the further south you get in the Caribbean the fewer US yachts you tend to see. A couple of winters ago in Admiralty Bay, Bequia MAYBE 15% of the boats were flying a US flag.
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  #154  
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Re: What stops Americans cruising the world?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
One thing I don't believe has been noted, yet: We Yanks truly fear the prospect of Med-mooring... :-)
I'm not going to admit to fearing it. To be a competent skipper, one needs to be able to play the hand they're dealt at any marina. However, one has to admit, this is the least desirable. It's not simply the more complicated approach, its the propensity for damage. Sure, you may have to slip between a couple of boats, but what about the next guy having to slip in next to you? Constant worry. Then, boarding from the transom isn't always straightforward on all ships and makeshift planking, if necessary, can chafe.

Quote:
......... American sailors can be surprisingly resistant to the notion of rafting up......
This one marks me to a tee. After dropping a bunch on a topside paint job, no one is going to ruin it but me!

Further, I get a little particular on how my decks are treated, what you walk on, what you can pull on, etc. I've seen too many others treat their boats as disposable and it would make me nauseous to have other climbing across.

As far as personal space goes, it depends on the day for me. Some days I want to make friends, others I want peace and quiet. Both need to be available for me to consider it good cruising grounds.
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  #155  
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Re: What stops Americans cruising the world?

Med mooring is no more difficult or likley to result in damage than any other type of mooring.
In some cases it is even better.
I am med moored over winter at the moment living aboard.
The other day we had 66 knots of wind. The boat did not touch it's neighbours, we are not rubbing against anything at all and we were perfectly secure.

We also carry and use lots of fenders as well.

In three years of sailing the only place we have had to raft up was in Honfleur.

Hopefully I can dispel some of your misconceptions as much as you are dispelling mine. I know that having a fear of the unknown is scary. Every time we go out and everywhere we go is unknown to us but the mind is sometimes our worst enemy.

The Brits are probably worse than many others. In marinas we have been in in the UK there were always several people saying that "one day" they will go but.. and there is always a but.... We knew they would never go but maybe cruising long term is a mindset... I don't know.
It is far easier to make excuses to not go rather than to go.
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  #156  
Old 03-05-2014
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Re: What stops Americans cruising the world?

Quote:
Originally Posted by outbound View Post
I stand in total awe of Killarney or a friend who posted here as HannaH2 now taking his Boreal to high latitudes. Having done some minimal planning for such voyages I realize what a huge undertaking such travels really are.
Thanks for the compliment but not sure if it is warranted. In a very real way you don't do a circumnavigation. Instead you do a series of connected short to long voyages that gradually take you downwind until you end up pretty much where you started. Other than reading Cornell's very useful book to get a sense of when you don't want to be in certain places (led to a back of envelope kind of schedule) we did not plan the whole thing out. It was more a matter of we are here (e.g. Panama) where do we want to go next - Ecuador or Galapagos? That choice gives you certain opportunities and takes away others. Once you have done what you want there (for us, Ecuador) it is on to the next destination, here the Galapagos made perfect sense so there was no real choice to be made. Your overall timing is constrained by the next tropical cyclone season and sometimes by visas.

BTW, in our trip the only passage that came close to the challenge and conditions of Mauritius-South Africa was Norfolk-St Thomas so you can have very heavy conditions close to home. I guess the difference between these two is that going to the islands can be benign if you get lucky, going to SA will always be a challenge. I think we were lucky going to Richards Bay compared to friends who had to heave-to for five days waiting for the right conditions to cross the Agulhas. Lucky in this case meant we still had 10 days of 25 to 45 knots.
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  #157  
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Re: What stops Americans cruising the world?

Quote:
Originally Posted by killarney_sailor View Post
Thanks for the compliment but not sure if it is warranted. In a very real way you don't do a circumnavigation. Instead you do a series of connected short to long voyages that gradually take you downwind until you end up pretty much where you started. .
Killarney,
Although we have sailed nowhere near as far as you, you still sum up the cruising life wonderfully.
Passages are taken day by day.
We get the best weather predictions we can and when we think it is right we go. Our destinations are sometimes chosen by winds rather than planning.
Often we get asked where we will be in a months time but it is hard to say where you will be in a day or twos time.
You cannot really plan but look at what you have got and work with that.
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  #158  
Old 03-05-2014
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Re: What stops Americans cruising the world?

Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
One thing I don't believe has been noted, yet: We Yanks truly fear the prospect of Med-mooring... :-)

It's more complicated than that, of course... But there is one thing we Americans tend to value a bit more than many Euros. Namely, our personal 'Space'... As so many of us have been reared in suburban or rural settings, in very general terms we are simply not as accustomed to living in as close quarters as Europeans appear to be... As a result, the very tight crowding found in many Mediterranean harbors has little appeal for many Americans, and even our most popular cruising grounds and harbors don't come close to rivaling the way boats are packed into the quays in places like Croatia, in August... American sailors can be surprisingly resistant to the notion of rafting up, for example, and while many Europeans accustomed to such close quarters at home think nothing of anchoring 'on top of' a neighbor in places like the Caribbean, it seems to be primarily Americans who become a bit more uptight when confronted with such crowding...

I've explored most of the European shoreline of the Med by land, the only sailing I've done has been in Croatia... Absolutely wondrous part of the world, I'd love to get my own boat to parts of it someday... But I tend to favor avoiding the crowds, and the prospect of spending August in any of the more popular destinations would have little appeal, to me... Should I ever make it to Europe, it would more likely be to places like Scotland, or Norway, in an effort to better maintain the integrity of my own personal 'Space'... :-)
So you call these packed anchorages? All these pictures were taken on July or August, all with the exception of the first, last year and they are far from to be the only places where I staid alone or with very few boats around.:











The med is big and not all the areas are the same. You are mostly right in what regards central Croatia, most of the Balearic Islands and most of Italian Islands but even om those places I was sometimes the only boat on anchorage. You just not to follow the crowd. On Eastern med the situation is very different and even in what regards city quays they are far from crowded. There are so many Islands, so many little ports that is just not happening and it will be hard to happen.

Regarding rafting up, I have been cruising the med (with some interruptions on the Atlantic) for the last 12 years and never have been rafted up. Mostly the boats that you see that way are flotilla charter boats that chose to be that way for the party or just because they want to be all together and not spread by different nearby anchorages.

Regards

Paulo
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Last edited by PCP; 03-05-2014 at 09:42 AM.
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  #159  
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Re: What stops Americans cruising the world?

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
Nostradamus-
...
Much of the world has become a uniform melting pot, and we can find that in our own cities without all the travel. Much of the world has become less exotic. Fifty years ago, you couldn't find US fast food chains in London or Paris. Today? They infest the world and "local" norms are far more uniform than they used to be.
[COLOR="SeaGreen"]I live in Toronto, widely thought of as the most multicultural city in the world, with half the population being born in another country, most commonly in Asia - China, India, Pakistan, etc, but lots from elsewhere too. The school I taught in had 53! languages spoken in the home. This should make Toronto the model for the homogenized world you think exists. But, being in Italy is not remotely like being in the Italian districts of Toronto (I think there are 400,000 Italians here), let alone China being like the Chinese districts (we have 500,000 Chinese including my wife). Part of globalization is that we are becoming more similar, but only very slowly and on the periphery of what makes a country unique. Go into one of the zillions of KFCs in China and check out the menu if you want to see what I mean.

Because of globalization, travel today is easier because a lot more people speak English than earlier - there are exceptions, in smaller islands in Indonesia for example, it is hard to find English, but you manage. If you decide you want to eat in a McDonalds in Pago Pago or Papeete that is entirely possible, but they are not that common. We found that Mickey Ds was worth visiting because they almost always had free WiFi in places where Internet access was problematic. Generally we would buy a sundae or something because their were cheap and the local foods were readily available and more interesting (except for the BBQed guinea pigs in Ecuador ).


In many places, we're greeted with open hostility and we're the target of kidnappings and other violence. That's not a problem in France or Germany perhaps, but you can visit our State Department's travel advisory site to see where kidnappings and ransoms have been a bigger problem. And not just for Americans.

Perhaps you should not have chosen France as an example, because lots of Canadians, Brits, etc. might report that they encountered hostility there - although that has not been my experience there.

You can choose to be afraid or not. We have not heard of any (as in not one) of the American cruisers we have met say that they have been met with any hostility (open or closed), let alone violence or kidnappings in the three dozen countries we have visited. There are certainly a substantial number of people in the US who seem afraid of the world, with no real reason for this.

You should look at consular travel advisories and take them into account in your travels. Every western government has such services, but you also need to be able to interpret them. Governments have to be very conservative in their estimates of security and tend to overstate the problems (not talking about the obvious hotspots like Afghanistan and Libya). I worked in Lesotho for several months as a volunteer and did not even hear about any crimes in the districts I was in and yet the Canadian government had it in their middle category of security.
.
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Back in the water in Grenada - with new main and #2 and cockpit canvas (Santa came early). Will spend the winter and early spring in the Caribbean and then head to Bermuda and the northeast US. Still trying to decide if we will bring the boat to Canada, either in 2015 or 2016.
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  #160  
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Re: What stops Americans cruising the world?

PCP,
We came from Gibraltar, spent a lot of summer in the Balearic Isles and went all around Sicily. We were anchored 95% of the time (only exception was for others). We never rafted and always were able to anchor everywhere we went.
Where were the photos taken?
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