Hello! I am new.... - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 03-10-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Northern Ontario
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
snikad is on a distinguished road
Hello! I am new....

I would just like to take my first post here to say hello to everyone on what seems to be a wonderful forum.

Well, im 20 and going to college next year. I have never been sailing, but I have always had an interest in it. I realise that this is obviously an activity that usually requires substancial finances, but I have come to learn what I can.

I would really apreciate any advice you all could give me on internet resources. Advice on taking a course or anything would be apreciated.

thanks,
Matt
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 03-10-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pasadena, CA
Posts: 18
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
cogzoid is on a distinguished road
5 years ago, I was where you were. Start saving some money, and start looking around for deals. Get yourself a small (tiny, even) used boat and start sailing. You'll have a blast and you'll learn really fast. Baby steps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 03-10-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Northern Ontario
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
snikad is on a distinguished road
I really feel that later on i will want to use a catamaran, but for starting out and learning, would it be better to use a tiny dualhull or a monohull?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 03-13-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
david333 is on a distinguished road
There are many fairly inexpensive ways to break into sailing, depending on where you live. In my area, there are two sailing clubs where you can take lessons and get full access to their fleet of boats (at one club this includes windsurfers, catamarans and monohulls). The annual fee for either club is less than $500/year. See if you have something similar in your area - check with local colleges, and search the internet. Also, if you are near a marina with sailboats, especially if they have regattas, you can volunteer to crew and learn lots about boats.
If there are not these options in your area, I would second the message from the other poster to see about purchasing small and used to start with. It does not need to be an exceedingly expensive hobby/passion.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 03-13-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Aircooled is on a distinguished road
Education

Matt,

I'd enroll in the United States Power and Sail Squadron boating education course/s.

What part of the country do you live in?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 03-13-2006
PBzeer's Avatar
Wandering Aimlessly
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Cruising
Posts: 20,258
Thanks: 0
Thanked 86 Times in 83 Posts
Rep Power: 14
PBzeer has a spectacular aura about PBzeer has a spectacular aura about PBzeer has a spectacular aura about
Northern Ontario sounds like it could be anywhere from North Bay to Thunder Bay. So it sounds like you can't be too far from a large body of water. Crewing might be your best bet if you're living on a college budget. It will give you a taste and let you see if you want to put money in to it.
__________________
John
Ontario 32 - Aria

Free, is the heart, that lives not, in fear.
Full, is the spirit, that thinks not, of falling.
True, is the soul, that hesitates not, to give.
Alive, is the one, that believes, in love.
JCP


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Website & Blog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 03-13-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Pasadena, CA
Posts: 18
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
cogzoid is on a distinguished road
I think either a monohull or a dualhull will give you plenty of experience. At this point it's all about learning to handle the sails and rudder, but mostly it's about having fun! Start hanging out at the marina and meeting people. Sailors are usually great people and some may have pity on you and take you out for a sail.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 03-13-2006
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,887
Thanks: 7
Thanked 26 Times in 23 Posts
Rep Power: 10
nolatom will become famous soon enough
I'd vote monohull. The most challenging (and fun) part of learning to sail is learning how to sail close-hauled with the right mixture of pointing and speed, and how to tack smoothly and get going, and pointing, on the new tack.

If you can get good at sailing upwind, reaching and running is a "walk in the park"

In a nice, medium-or-better-performance monohull sloop, upwind sailing and tacking/beating is a thing of joy, as the boat carries some momentum through the tack and is still moving well as you start out on the new tack. A catamaran, which is a thrill on a reach, loses too much of its forward momentum when you head into the wind to tack. My idea of sailing hell is having to beat a catamaran up through a narrow channel or passage with lots of tacks. It goes "dead" during a tack, and has to be nursed back to life once you finally get it around.

Do your learning on a monohull, then get a cat later if you want.

Cat lovers, flame away.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 03-14-2006
Jim
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Sandy, Utah
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
jbanta_utah is on a distinguished road
Snikad

I agree that a Power Squadron is a good way to start. You can learn on biger boat by just letting people at your local marina know you want to sail. Sailors like to take the young out and give them a chance to get into the fun.. having said that I can't say this next thing strong enough. You can learn better, how the wind and water react while sailing a small boat much quicker than in a big boat. A lazer or sunfish is a good way to start and good news they are not expensive. Will you get wet... YOU BET ... will you have fun YOU BET... will you learn how to sail... YOU BET What you have to do is want to go sailing. Classes are great but there is no better teacher than trying it and learning from your mistakes..

PS.. Stay close to shore and wear a PFD
__________________
Jim Aboard the ARGO
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 03-14-2006
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,471
Thanks: 6
Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
Snikad,

Owning a boat is expensive - sailing is generally free or available at low cost. I take numerous guests out sailing during the summer and over the years no one has ever paid a penny (except me). When racing I am often looking for additional crew, generally minimum qualifications are:
- a reasonable good disposition
- breathing.

So if you want to go sailing at little or no cost:
1. look up any area sailing programs, there's often some community groups providing low cost sailing. For example I learned years ago at http://www.community-boating.org in Boston. Looks like an adult can sail there now 8 hours a day, 180 days a year for $190.
2. Check any local yacht clubs and race programs for crew wanted or crew available lists (for exaqmple http://www.hbphrf.org/hb_banks.htm ) Racing is not everyone's cup of tea, but there's plenty of demand for semi-knowledgeable crew and even some demand for just rail meat. Plus you have tyhe opportunity to get in with like minded people who share the same passion, or is it actually mental illness? Opinions differ.
3. Get to know area boaters by any means including visting the marinas and boatyeards and asking people questions about their boats and the boat scene. There's nothing sailors like better than the opportunity to talk about sailing...

As pleasant and enjoyable as sailing is, its usually more fun sharing it with others, so the others get free ride, perhaps at the cost of bringing the beer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:19 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.