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  #11  
Old 11-03-2006
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Happy to send some photos but how? Jack
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  #12  
Old 02-09-2007
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Just bought a sweet eastward ho 24, got a great deal and it is in great shhape, just needs some of the woodwork redone. Anyone out there with this boat, any pictures?

michael
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  #13  
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Tom, and the rest,

We have had an EHo 24 (Manitou) for 17 years now, in Minnesota. Nice, comfortable, spacious, and very beutiful. We get lots of compliments on itís looks at docks or on the water, even from large power cruisers.

There was a question about chainplates, which do look small, but here are a few factors in their favor. This is a very wide boat compared to, say, a bluewater boat like a Cape Dory. Wider means less tension when heeled (or rolled). Both have shrouds clear out to the rails, and both are fastened right to the deck. So itís down to deck and backing plate strength. I made larger backing plates, bedded in with thick epoxy, rather than fastening to the hull.

Some modifications over the years: Twin mid-boom mainsheets, bowsprit, propane heater and cooker, regular head, 35 gal. holding tank, 4 batteries, big alternator, 12v refrigerator, large fore and aft ports in the doghouse for inside steering using a remote tillerpilot controller, stereo, video, microwave, experimental lightning gear, inverter. The list goes on. One project this winter is to make a set of doors for the companionway.

The bowsprit project was successful in a few ways Iíd like to mention. It made room for a larger, modern-furling 150% genoa, which in turn added speed and removed nearly all of the weather helm. With the tack further forward, the reduced angle of attack into the wind improved pointing. The bowsprit also looks like it belongs on a classic boat like this.

Lately Iím experimenting with barber hauls for the jibs, rigged inside the shrouds for beating.

I'd show a picture, but the "insert image" icon up there seems to be looking for a web page, which I don't have. I could e-mail an attachment to anyone interested.
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  #14  
Old 01-21-2008
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Post your pics at a site like photobucket and then paste the direct IMG link in your post.
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Old 01-21-2008
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  #16  
Old 09-26-2009
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Eastward Ho

I know this is an old thread, but are there still any Eastward Ho sailors out there?
I am trying to buy one and I need to know as much as I can about them?
I have heard that they are slow, although I'm not in a hurry. I just want to be able to sail upstream sometimes.
Thanks, Tim
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Old 09-26-2009
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Years ago, we owned Thumbelina, an Eastward Ho 24, we sailed her all over in all kinds of weather. We were sailing from Union Wharf on Boston Harbor down to Marion - as we were heading out of the Cape Cod Canal, the CG station was flying Gale flags - but we headed out into Buzzard Bay anyway. We took a pounding, but Thumbelina did just fine. Great little boat.
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  #18  
Old 09-27-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tjr818 View Post
I know this is an old thread, but are there still any Eastward Ho sailors out there?
I am trying to buy one and I need to know as much as I can about them?
I have heard that they are slow, although I'm not in a hurry. I just want to be able to sail upstream sometimes.
Thanks, Tim
I have an Eastward Ho 31'. I purchased it last year and absolutely love it. I've heard some refer to the Eastward Ho's (24' and 31') as motorsailors, but I don't think this is a good description. It's just a good, solid, full keel sailboat. With my 120% genny I can get up to hull speed in 9-10kt winds with no problem. These boats were built by Clark Ryder (better known for the Southern Cross and Sea Sprite) through contract with the Portsmouth Yacht Company. The 31's have nearly the same specs as the Cape Dory and Pacific Seacraft 31's, but for a lot less money. The 24's are very similar to the 31's, except smaller, of course.

Last edited by voice3; 09-27-2009 at 07:59 AM.
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Old 10-01-2009
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EAstward Ho

Quote:
Originally Posted by cvanderson View Post
Tom, and the rest,

We have had an EHo 24 (Manitou) for 17 years now, in Minnesota. Nice, comfortable, spacious, and very beutiful. We get lots of compliments on itís looks at docks or on the water, even from large power cruisers.

There was a question about chainplates, which do look small, but here are a few factors in their favor. This is a very wide boat compared to, say, a bluewater boat like a Cape Dory. Wider means less tension when heeled (or rolled). Both have shrouds clear out to the rails, and both are fastened right to the deck. So itís down to deck and backing plate strength. I made larger backing plates, bedded in with thick epoxy, rather than fastening to the hull.

Some modifications over the years: Twin mid-boom mainsheets, bowsprit, propane heater and cooker, regular head, 35 gal. holding tank, 4 batteries, big alternator, 12v refrigerator, large fore and aft ports in the doghouse for inside steering using a remote tillerpilot controller, stereo, video, microwave, experimental lightning gear, inverter. The list goes on. One project this winter is to make a set of doors for the companionway.

The bowsprit project was successful in a few ways Iíd like to mention. It made room for a larger, modern-furling 150% genoa, which in turn added speed and removed nearly all of the weather helm. With the tack further forward, the reduced angle of attack into the wind improved pointing. The bowsprit also looks like it belongs on a classic boat like this.

Lately Iím experimenting with barber hauls for the jibs, rigged inside the shrouds for beating.

I'd show a picture, but the "insert image" icon up there seems to be looking for a web page, which I don't have. I could e-mail an attachment to anyone interested.
Hi, I wanted to make this a PM, but I am too new to the sysstem for that to be allowed.
Hello,
I realize that this is an old thread, but I am considering the purchase of an Eastward Ho and I would like some more information about them. Can you help me?
Any advice, cautions, or pictures would be most appreciated. If you are having trouble posting pictures you can e-mail me at "tjr818@lycos.com".
Thanks, Tim
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  #20  
Old 01-29-2010
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Eastward Ho 24

I have a Eastward Ho 24 here on the west coast of Florida. Would it be possible to email and possiblly cal. My email is srqvon@comcast.net
Thanks Norman


Quote:
Originally Posted by cvanderson View Post
Tom, and the rest,

We have had an EHo 24 (Manitou) for 17 years now, in Minnesota. Nice, comfortable, spacious, and very beutiful. We get lots of compliments on itís looks at docks or on the water, even from large power cruisers.

There was a question about chainplates, which do look small, but here are a few factors in their favor. This is a very wide boat compared to, say, a bluewater boat like a Cape Dory. Wider means less tension when heeled (or rolled). Both have shrouds clear out to the rails, and both are fastened right to the deck. So itís down to deck and backing plate strength. I made larger backing plates, bedded in with thick epoxy, rather than fastening to the hull.

Some modifications over the years: Twin mid-boom mainsheets, bowsprit, propane heater and cooker, regular head, 35 gal. holding tank, 4 batteries, big alternator, 12v refrigerator, large fore and aft ports in the doghouse for inside steering using a remote tillerpilot controller, stereo, video, microwave, experimental lightning gear, inverter. The list goes on. One project this winter is to make a set of doors for the companionway.

The bowsprit project was successful in a few ways Iíd like to mention. It made room for a larger, modern-furling 150% genoa, which in turn added speed and removed nearly all of the weather helm. With the tack further forward, the reduced angle of attack into the wind improved pointing. The bowsprit also looks like it belongs on a classic boat like this.

Lately Iím experimenting with barber hauls for the jibs, rigged inside the shrouds for beating.

I'd show a picture, but the "insert image" icon up there seems to be looking for a web page, which I don't have. I could e-mail an attachment to anyone interested.
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