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post #11 of 84 Old 06-21-2006
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A couple quick points here,

-You should open up the blisters before your leave. If you do grind them out, make sure that you grind down into solid glass, and not just through the gelcoat. You should also cover the hull against driving rain but leave the cover open so that air can circulate.
-There was a misspelling in the above link to David Pascoe's site is http://www.yachtsurvey.com
-Peeling is generally believed to be better than grinding. Grinding builds up heat and at least one paper that I have seen suggests that the heat build up can undermine the immeadiate sub-layers.
-I am a big believer in laying up the repair with cloth and epoxy resin. I agree with David Pascoe's point about removing all unsaturated laminate and filling all pinholes and with his point that unreinforced epoxy does not have the strength to bridge gaps. Using cloth adds to the labor involved in making the repair but it also helps guarentee a more permanent fix.
-While I understand and essentially agree with his point on Osmotic blistering, I personally have seen cases where water from the bilge has moved through the laminate causing major delamination. The worst cases of that that I have seen have been in keel cavities where poor laminate is more prevelient (its hard to work properly in a confined space like a keel cavity) and where water is often trapped against the interior of this inferior laminate.

Jeff
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post #12 of 84 Old 06-22-2006
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Question

Was there a year of manufacture in the industry that breakthroughs were found or technology was improved that made blistering occur less often?
Maybe even some of the individual builders who have been more successful than others at eliminating the problem?
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post #13 of 84 Old 06-22-2006
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Each manufacturer had a period of years during which their boats had the worst blister problem. The specific years varied from manunfacturer to manufacturer. In a general sense resins began being reformulated during the mid-1970's due to the "Oil Crisises". For most U.S. manufacturers the worst period for blistering was somewhere around 1979-1983, with the problem tapering off throughout the 1980's as better resins and building techniques came on line. It was during the 1979-1983 period that the worst of the true osmotic blistering was a problem and boats with true osmotic blistering can never permanently be repaired. (These boats often have lower prices than the same model produced in earlier and later production years). The European and Asian yards seemed to take longer resolving the problem than the better U.S. yards.

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post #14 of 84 Old 06-22-2006
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I had to relaminate my Little Harbor 38 back in 1996. Like your boat she had sat in the water year round. I tried sand blasting but the problem was too deep and I would have been better off going straight to having the boat blister peeled as it would have produced a fairer surface to build back on. Anyway I did have to boat peeled and then spent days sanding. This part was a lot of fun in a tyvek jump suit in the 95 deg. / 95 humidity NC sun. After that I relaminated with layers of 12.5 oz cloth and West System. I stuck with West System on the barrier coat too using their barrier coat additive. Start to finish I probably used something on the order of 20 gallons of West System!!! Ten years out now I've had no problems. Tips: figure at least six months to let the hull dry. Send me a message if you want to buy a Traumenx (sp) Skipper moisture meter as I have one that I bought for the job and never bothered to sell. Also, when you relaminate, if you have to, plan your work so you get a chemical link between West System coats or if this is not possible use their release fabric as it will help you get a better mechanical bond.
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post #15 of 84 Old 06-22-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H
A couple quick points here,

-You should open up the blisters before your leave. If you do grind them out, make sure that you grind down into solid glass, and not just through the gelcoat. You should also cover the hull against driving rain but leave the cover open so that air can circulate.
-There was a misspelling in the above link to David Pascoe's site is http://www.yachtsurvey.com
-Peeling is generally believed to be better than grinding. Grinding builds up heat and at least one paper that I have seen suggests that the heat build up can undermine the immeadiate sub-layers.
-I am a big believer in laying up the repair with cloth and epoxy resin. I agree with David Pascoe's point about removing all unsaturated laminate and filling all pinholes and with his point that unreinforced epoxy does not have the strength to bridge gaps. Using cloth adds to the labor involved in making the repair but it also helps guarentee a more permanent fix.
-While I understand and essentially agree with his point on Osmotic blistering, I personally have seen cases where water from the bilge has moved through the laminate causing major delamination. The worst cases of that that I have seen have been in keel cavities where poor laminate is more prevelient (its hard to work properly in a confined space like a keel cavity) and where water is often trapped against the interior of this inferior laminate.

Jeff
Believe Jeff meant all saturated laminate above... otherwise I agree with what he has said.

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post #16 of 84 Old 06-22-2006
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Actually, I meant 'unsaturated' by which I meant, remove all laminate that did not appear to be properly saturated with resin. As I read that back to meyself, this was a case where what I meant was perfectly obvious to me as I was writing it but was not clear to anyone else from what I had written. I hate when that happens, but thanks for pointing out the ambiguity of that sentence.

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post #17 of 84 Old 06-22-2006
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There was an excellent article in Cruising World a few years ago in the "Practical Sailor" section that gave step by step instructions on repairing blisters. It was an excellent and easy to follow article.
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post #18 of 84 Old 06-22-2006
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Definitely, open them up before you leave. Strip whatever you are going to strip off the bottom, so it dries more thorougly, and make sure no water will acucmulate INSIDE the hull (from rain, etc.) while you are gone. When you come back it should be much drier and that's when you want to do the repairs. Don't be surprised to find you are floating higher in the water after a 3-month dry out!
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post #19 of 84 Old 06-22-2006
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More info

The link that Rich H was displaying is yachtsurvey.com (he left out the 't'). Other information at zanhisers.com, a marina in the Chesapeake Bay. Follow links to their paper on hull blistering. It's based on a coast guard funded study by the University of Rhode Island by Thomas Rocket and Vincent Rose, The Causes of Boat Hull Blisters, 1987.

Google their names and you'll find more infomation.

Also, search this message board for blistering. Sailor Mitch helped me with my blistering problem. There are several posts on the topic.

Good luck- blisters suck.

Max
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post #20 of 84 Old 06-22-2006 Thread Starter
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Out of the water

Will she is out of the water and she looks like a 15 year old that just had a run in with the cookie jar. I don't thank that I'm going to have the time before the 30th to do the work. As far as I can tail everything from the water line down will have to come off. I have to go back out to her in the morning to check the covering (We got rain this evening, first in a mouth). I'll post some pic's so you all can see what it looks like.

I would like to say thanks to all the great seaman that have posted very helpful info on this problem.

Thank You,
May the sun aways be on your face and the wind at your back. Good sailing to you all.


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