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  #31  
Old 10-03-2006
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Sand blaster is probably the fastest, but be careful. Safer to use synthetic media, but more expensive. hope this helps.
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  #32  
Old 10-03-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TXS-ALAMO
Has anyone heard of hotair vacume used to speed the drying process? I have seen a few cryptic references to vacume drying, but no details and it seems to be something beyond us DIYs.
I got some literature on that a few years ago. I don't remember the name of the product. It was not a DIY; it was available as a service only. They used a heated rubber rectangle of several square feet attached to a vacuum pump. I think it had to stay on for some hours before it was moved. My 34 boat is about 250 sq ft underneath so I can imagine how long that would take at current labor rates.
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  #33  
Old 10-03-2006
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I'm in the tail end of this very repair on my C-27. I used the West System epoxy for the repair. For the grinding/sanding I purchased a 6" Porter Cable random orbit sander that is speed adjustable (used to be called a "DA") purchased at Lowes for about $140 a year ago. This is one of the greatest tools I've ever owned (I do part time carpentry in addition to my regular line of work). I pretty much followed the West System process for blister repair after doing months of research on how to do it. I too, have pretty much coated the bottom of the hull with the epoxy filler. One thing you want to make sure you do is wet out the blistered areas (once ground out) with straight epoxy (no fillers). Mine was so extensive that I just rolled the entire bottom with straight epoxy. Then went back and built up [as needed] with small rounds of fiberglass mat. Next was fairing with epoxy and colloidal silica (I used a structural mix rather than the softer "fairing" mix). I am presently in the process of sanding again to smooth it all out. Next will be a couple more coats of clear epoxy, then the Interlux barrier coat (2000E). Some day I'll actually get the boat painted!
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  #34  
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One more thing I learned: timing is critical. Once the clear epoxy is on, you will want to be ready to get the fairing compound on before the epoxy gasses out and leaves amine blush. I found that scotch bright pads work, but are some kind of evil on your hands when trying to remove amine blush from inside a concave dimple. This was not easy and it only took one time for me to schedule so I could "fill" the same day, thus saving the need to remove any blush. Once the epoxy "kicks" fill the holes. I found doing a 3-4 foot section of one side of the hull worked really well. It's easy, just time consuming and kinda messy.

Good luck!!
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  #35  
Old 10-04-2006
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Thanks

Thanks for your help so far, When you used then West System epoxy what hardern did you use and at what time of the year did you do the work. It is about to get into the cold mouth here.

Again Thanks for your help.
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Old 10-04-2006
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Sonny, I'm embarrassed to answer that question. I purchased materials around this time last year anticipating cooler temps. I used the fast cure hardener. Unfortunately, stripping/sanding took way longer than anticipated and I ended up at the epoxy stage this summer. I used the fast hardener anyway. I had only one lost batch of epoxy (my first filler mix) due to it "kicking" too soon. By adjusting the amount you use you can control your waste very well.
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Old 10-04-2006
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relatively simple procedure

Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster
Treating the blister problem is a relatively simple procedure ... .
Sometimes its simple and sometimes its otherwise.

The recent blister repair on a friend's SW42 from a well known Maine builder involved machine peeling the hull, replacing all of the wet Airex, and glassing a new bottom, requiring nine months, $15,000, plus a sailing season.

But perhaps this example is best saved for the next iteration of the hull coring-or-no-coring debate.
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  #38  
Old 10-04-2006
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No Title

Thanks for the info Parley, and for the insight Sailingfool. At this point I don't thank that I'll be taking it to a shop since most of them around here will be starting winter repairs soon. I thank that myself and my son will be doing the work together (Father son bond thing), it is just a matter of setting up shop.

On another note for Parley, Was your boat on jack stands when you did the work or a trailer, and how did you go about doing the area under said stand or bunk.
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  #39  
Old 10-04-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonny Oyler
On another note for Parley, Was your boat on jack stands when you did the work or a trailer, and how did you go about doing the area under said stand or bunk.
Good question. It is on a trailer. I spent a bunch of time trying to figure this one out. Basically, I did the entire bottom sans under pads. Then went back and "dropped" the pads one at a time; repaired that area (sanding, grinding out pimples, clear epoxy, and filler) then brought the pad back up and moved on to the next one. That's the overall, 100,000 foot view. The reality is, I was also taking advantage at this point to also level the boat in preparation for striking a new water line. Also, I was not real comfortable dropping the rear pads without some reinforcement. I ended up attaching a "come-a-long" from stem casting down to the trailer. I also used some heavy duty ratchet straps (3-4" wide ones used for trailering the boat) from the primary winches down to the trailer when dropping the "front" pads. I adjusted these as necessary depending on where on the hull I was working. Worked out great except for the one pad shaft that slid back down inside its tube.

Also, I forgot to mention a dynamite method for grinding out the blisters: Dremel tool. This made very quick work of it. So much so, that I ground out areas not blistered but could "see" a void below. Additionally, it is very easy to control.

Last edited by Parley; 10-04-2006 at 07:25 PM.
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  #40  
Old 10-04-2006
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Don't forget to wear the proper safety gear...goggles, respirators, gloves, etc... A tyvek bunny suit is a good idea if you don't want to be itching from the fiberglass for a few days. Wearing that gear in the summer time is nearly lethal...but this time of year, it should be relatively comfortable.
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