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post #1 of 9 Old 05-01-2015 Thread Starter
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Cedar VS Epoxied Marine Ply

Hi there,

Just got my first boat, the interior is slightly gutted and will soon be working on that. Been talking to some folks in my community about what my best options for doing the interior are, and it seems there are two main opinions.

One being to mill some yellow cedar and use that.

The other being to get marine plywood and epoxy it.

Thoughts?
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post #2 of 9 Old 05-01-2015
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Re: Cedar VS Epoxied Marine Ply

MORE information.. there are some highly skilled people on here just waiting to help!
type size of boat? use of said boat? Salt water or fresh? Photos are a must!
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post #3 of 9 Old 05-01-2015 Thread Starter
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Re: Cedar VS Epoxied Marine Ply

The type is a rebuild of a 25' fin keeled, glass boat that I'm not sure of the make. It's now a full keeled glass hull, with wooden cabin. Not sure what the cabin is made of.
The boat will be to live aboard on the salty west coast. I don't currently have any photos of the interior. Parts I need to re-do are the v-birth, the counter where two propane burners (or perhaps non-pressurized alcohol, haven't decided) and a sink will be going, paneling after I do insulation and the companion way door. The main source of heat will be a woodstove.
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Re: Cedar VS Epoxied Marine Ply

Any more vital information that can help with my conundrum?
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Re: Cedar VS Epoxied Marine Ply

You seem unexperienced both for a boat and woodwork. Use marin ply mainly. You might need some wood for some connective parts. Plywood is easier to work with and will cover nearly all areas with a single piece.


If the cabin is not fiberglass but wood, you will probably have some water ingress from the top which is not good at all for a liveaboard.
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Re: Cedar VS Epoxied Marine Ply

Well, I guess another thing to consider is that my father, a wood genius, will be teaching/helping me along the way.

My question, more directly, is in the long run, which will cause less issues?
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Re: Cedar VS Epoxied Marine Ply

Cat,

I'm sure your Dad will be a huge help to you as you move forward -- watch and listen to him closely.

Just like in a home, plywood and dimensioned lumber both have their places. Because it is more dimensionally stable, you'll typically find plywood used for bulkheads, cabinet carcasses, and large flat surfaces. Most times the visible side of the plywood is covered with a very thin hardwood veneer; sometimes the hardwood is not that thin. Sometimes the plywood is simply painted.

Dimensioned lumber is used for structural cross members and finish carpentry.

Yellow cedar would seem to be decent choice for interior projects. It's certainly a lot lighter in color than you typically find in boats -- which can be a good thing. Sometimes teak (and other darker hardwood) interiors seem a little "cave like" if there's not a lot of natural light below.


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post #8 of 9 Old 05-03-2015
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Re: Cedar VS Epoxied Marine Ply

Do not underestimate the complexity of the job you are tackling.

Remember almost nothing is square or straight. Panels will often have beveled edges with changing angles.

Refinishing boat interiors is regarded as a VERY skilled job.
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post #9 of 9 Old 05-03-2015
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If it's already gutted, sounds like the horse is out of the barn. You can use pretty much whatever you want to woodwise. Many people will swear by west systems penetrating epoxy as a first finishing coat to minimize wood movement. If the boat is in the water year round, the wood will move less than, say a house next to a stream in Vermont or Maine as the relative humidity will stay more constant. And if you finish it well and be sure to plug all your deck leaks first (ideal time is now when the interior is gutted anyway) you can pretty much use whatever you would like.
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