where has the hand crank gone???? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 08-15-2006
SimonV's Avatar
Wish I never found SN!
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Brisbane Australia
Posts: 1,996
Thanks: 3
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SimonV will become famous soon enough
where has the hand crank gone????

I was at the Boat show in Sydney the other week, checking out the cost of a new diesel engine.

The only one I found with a hand crank (should the power mysteriously evaporate, (kids) ) was the Kubota.

Has the marine diesel, gone the way of the motor cycle kick start? Is it a case of "Hello, hello could you come out about 200 mile and give me a boost?

A good hand crank always ends in, A HAPPY ENDING.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 08-15-2006
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 107 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
You know, I have heard about hand cranks, but for the life of me, I have yet to see one in action. Thoughts of a model T come to mind. I would be curious if anyone has ever actually tried this?????????? If so, are both your arms and "facilities" still in place.

It seems to me to be more like s storm glass. Looks good and sounds good, but questionable results in the real world. But again, I am very ignorant on this subject.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 08-15-2006
NickL's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 121
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
NickL is on a distinguished road
I tried once, and that was all it took for me to get a jumper pack. My yanmar has it. I about broke my wrist. I guess if both of my banks and my jumper pack go out, it will be nice to have. Or if I am somewhere seatow can come and get jump I might just wait it out.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 08-15-2006
timebandit's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 928
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
timebandit is on a distinguished road
Being from a family of mechanics dating back to the late 1800 I'm gussing you are making a common mistake. Most people when trying to start an engine by hand or foot, place the piston just before the firing position. You should place the piston just after the firing and on the down stroke so that you have a chance to spin the engine and develope energy in the flywheel before the piston comes up on compression. You might also check to see if your engine has a compression release lever.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 08-15-2006
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 107 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Just curious, how are you supposed to know that on a diesel? Also, I would think with the compression on a diesel, moving that thing at all would take a small act of God.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 08-15-2006
Ronbye's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 134
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Ronbye is on a distinguished road
I have started my Volvo MD2B engine on hand crank. To start the engine you need to have the engine rotating fast enough to get through the power stroke. Not easy if you don't have decompression levers. Mine does. Secondly, the heat in the comustion chamber needs to be hot enough to ignite the air fuel mixture, I don't have glow plugs. So for me, this means that I have to crank the engine over with the decompression levers on and keep cranking until I think there is enough friction heat available. When I think it is right, I turn off one compression lever while cranking. When it starts on one cylinder, the crank handle slips in its slot, allowing me time to remove it and turn off the other decompression lever and the engine is now running on two cylinders. It sounds easy, but it is very difficult physically. You need to be in shape for this. If you have any medical problems at all I wouldn't attempt it.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 08-15-2006
timebandit's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 928
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
timebandit is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad
Just curious, how are you supposed to know that on a diesel? Also, I would think with the compression on a diesel, moving that thing at all would take a small act of God.
Just like any engine, just move it slowly through and then past the compression stroke.
I'm guessing most engines fire on the compression stroke.
I read somewhere that some enterprising sailor rigged a line to the main boom and used the wind in the sail to pull a rope to start his engine.
Personnaly I would just sail over a water fall and pop the clutch about half way down
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 08-15-2006
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 107 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
funny timebandit
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 08-15-2006
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Hand cranking a diesel is generally a losing option. Much higher compression makes it much harder to crank a diesel, compared to a gasoline engine. A better idea would be to carry a emergency jump start pack... like this.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 08-15-2006
captnnero's Avatar
yacht broker
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Herring Bay, Maryland
Posts: 251
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
captnnero is on a distinguished road
he don't need no stinkin starter

Quote:
Originally Posted by timebandit
...
I read somewhere that some enterprising sailor rigged a line to the main boom and used the wind in the sail to pull a rope to start his engine.
...
That was an article in Sail or Cruising World several years ago complete with a nice 3D drawing of the starter cord routing. It was ingenious. As I recall he had about a 40 footer. He rigged it up with the mainsail in tight but on a reach. Then he let the mainsheet out to spin the motor. He started this way on a daily basis for a while to charge batteries until the next port.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:45 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.