Fall and Winter in Vancouver/Seattle - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 08-29-2006
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 57
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Edo Kazumichi is on a distinguished road
Fall and Winter in Vancouver/Seattle

So just how crazy would a guy have to be to spend the winter living aboard in the Vancouver/Seattle area? And how is the sailing itself at that time of year?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 08-29-2006
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Tacoma, WA
Posts: 134
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SteveCox is on a distinguished road
I'm a little further south (Tacoma) but in general it is damp and relatively cold (just above freezing to the 50s) most of the time. There is not all that much actual precipitation but you might not see the sun for a couple of weeks at a time. Dawn is late and sunset is early so, dark, gray and damp describe the weather. The sailing actually is best in the winter. Most of the racing takes place then since there is actually wind in the winter (most of the time). Just be sure to have a good heater and foul weather gear.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 08-29-2006
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
I'd imagine that the biggest risk to someone sailing in the SeaTac area is hypothermia. But it should be doable. I sail in New England in the winter, and it is doable...but gets far colder than it is in the SeaTac area. Good foul weather gear—preferably a dry suit is a requirement, as are good gloves, hat, boots, and lots of fleece clothing. Fleece is good since it stays relatively warm, even when wet.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 08-29-2006
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 14,627
Thanks: 68
Thanked 187 Times in 179 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
We are based in Vancouver, do not live aboard but do sail fairly frequently throughout the fall, winter and early spring months.
Dressing properly is, of course, a given. We can get really mild days at times, but at others it's damp and cold. Winds in this area tend to be more boisterous in the winter months, so you actually can get some pretty good sailing in.
Living aboard in these latitudes requires good cabin heat and a boat that won't sweat too much. There are several liveaboard communities here that seem to be thriving and have long wait lists for moorage.
We typically get between 70 and 80 days on the water each year, about 60 of them are in warmer times. So that's still a good number of frostbite sailing days. We're fortunate to have the climate that permits it.
So, no, it's not crazy!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 09-02-2006
Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 57
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Edo Kazumichi is on a distinguished road
Thanks, folks. I appreciate it. It would seem that lack of moorage is a bigger problem than lack of heat.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fall ''02 Caribbean trip davealves Crew Wanted/Available 3 04-22-2002 10:59 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:06 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.