Tips for Owning a Boat, liveaboards, etc - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 17 Old 08-31-2006
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I prefer boat shoes to bare feet, but agree that the boat shoes should only be used on the boat. I have two sets of boat shoes on my boat....one set that is designed to get very wet and drains/dries quickly, the other look like sneakers. I also have a pair of Keen sandals that work pretty well. The reason I advocate boat shoes is broken toes are pretty common injury otherwise.

An anchor snubber is a good idea for other reasons as well, but I prefer using a line that is attached to the chain via a rolling hitch or chain hook and then run back through bow chocks to cleats on the boat. The snubbing line should be at least 40' long. That way you can let out more scope on the anchor chain without having to re-do the snubber. It also reduces the shock loading on the ground tackle.

Agree with most of the other opinions..especially the glass bottles tip. Cans, which can be crushed, or plastic bottles, which can be crushed, are a much better option and less likely to break.

Sunburn is a huge issue, even under a bimini. The water reflects much of the UV that causes the burns. Sunblock is a necessity.

BTW, on cuts...do not use iodine-based antiseptics. Many of the ocean borne bacteria are relatively resistant to it, as there is a fair amount of iodine-based compounds in ocean water, so it isn't as effective as the non-iodine based compounds.

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #12 of 17 Old 08-31-2006 Thread Starter
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1) When you start your engine, the first thing you should do is make sure you are making water.

2) If you are running your engine to charge batteries, change the rpms periodically and try dropping it in gear some too to put some load on it.

3) Periodically check your fuel/water seperator for water. It will gather at the bottom of the sight glass. it is easy to check by just peeking at it or draining some off (turn screw at the bottom).

4) If your engine ever dies, go to your fuel/water seperator first. It has a floating ball valve that automatically (hopefully) shuts the fuel supply off when it is full.

5) If you ever overheat, check and see if you are making water (probably not). Obviously, turn off the engine. Go below and remove the hose to the through hull (with the t-hull closed). Then, open it. If no water is coming out (probably not), you obviously sucked something up (typically a plastic bag). Before you dive the T-Hull, try closing and opening the T-hull a few times (waiting a few minutes inbetween). This will often cause the bag to loose suction and fall off. Coat hangers and shot-gun brushes are difficult to make the turn to clear it. If nothing still, you will have to dive it.

6) Diving your boat is difficult at sea (especially if there are any seas). As crazy as this sounds, when you get under there, all the T-Hulls seem to have moved or (if you have a lot of crap on your bottom) dissapeared. Take some time and get to know where your T-Hulls are while your boat is under water. (I know it sounds crazy, but it is the truth). I like to put on a full wet suit no matter the temp. It makes me float. Then, as I swim under, I am resting on the bottom of the hull and not fighting to stay up. Shot gun brushes do well to clean T-Hulls. Coat hangers work in a pinch. When you come back up really rinse off your wet suit. That crap all over the bottom of your boat really stinks.

7) Carry emergency plugs for your T-Hulls. They are a cheap way to save your boat and life. A t-shirt shoved into a hole will work in a pinch.
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post #13 of 17 Old 08-31-2006 Thread Starter
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1) When dock lines get hard, wash them off then drop them in a bucket with fabric softner & water. They will soften back up.

2) When making a long run/passage, boil water then put it in a thermos(s). It will keep it warm/hot for a long time. We use Folgers drop in coffee for making coffee (not the instant, it is in a tea bag). Little bready snacks, gingerbread cookies, and crackers are great too. Personally, we don't eat that much, but some people get a voracious appetite?!!

3) The best place to lay in the boat in bad seas is the lowest, most centered area. Many people will make lee cloths for a sea berth. Getting a blanket and laying in the cockpit is nice too.

4) Sea-sick patches have to be put on BEFORE (usually 24 hours) you leave. They will likely impair your ability to read or make out small words through your binocs.

5) Everyone gets sea sick. We all just have different thresholds. Don't feel bad about it. Symptoms include: Little lazy. Cold sweats. Watering mouth. I have found the laziness sets in well before the other symptoms, but everyone is different. Once you are sick, the patch does not do much good. Try hand steering. Do not go down below. Cold drinks are nice (Kool-aid, gatorade). Do not get stuck in the cockpit by yourself. When a person is sea sick, their ability to make good decisions is deminished. A sea sick sailor is a liability, so best to take all the precautions you can before you leave rather than tackling them at sea.

6) All freighters, barges and Sea Rays have the right of way, regardless of the rules. "Dead right" is a phrase not practiced at sea twice. Rules of the road are only as good as the people that know them or care to follow them.

7) Always carry a good mask, snorkel and fin. Other than getting to see some nice aquatic life, you never know when you will need to dive the hull.
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post #14 of 17 Old 08-31-2006
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seacocks

6) Besides the monthly seacock maintenance cycling here's another couple guidelines. If you're rumaging about the compartments and see a seacock, cycle it. This of course is modulo anything else going on at the time for that seacock. The other thing is to label every seacock so if someone less familiar with the boat has to find it, there will be no doubt. That way the captain may retain the option to stay on deck where the captain belongs in times of strife.

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post #15 of 17 Old 09-01-2006
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Many good advices here
1. I'm suprised nobody mentioned a good flashlight to locate a marker in the middle of the night before you ram it.

2.Motion sickness devices are getting really good, I bought my wife a electronic relief band and she hasn't been sick since. $135 at West Marine.

3.Binocular always good to have handy (e.g.when you pass that nude beach.)

4.Always remember to shut the valve to your propane tank.

5.Everything has it's place for easy locating in ruff conditions.
(make sure everybody is familiar with what goes where)

6. Don't rely only on your GPS, bring maps. Elecronics may fail to work.

E.
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post #16 of 17 Old 09-01-2006 Thread Starter
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Bolt down you Dock locker to the dock (if you can)... especially if you are on a floating dock. First good storm and it will dissapear.
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post #17 of 17 Old 09-01-2006
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I have recently re-discovered "Crystal Lite" drink mix. Comes in little tubs that make a half gallon with water. All kinds of flavors, I like the pink lemonade, pink grapefruit, and the decaf ice tea best. A weeks supply takes up less room than a can of coke, and theres not much to dispose of. Six of the little premix packets come in the neatest part of all, the container. These plastic doodads have a lot of uses. they reseal pretty well, and can act as cheapo throwaway cannisters for sugar, etc. I have cut one open and used the hard plastic as gasket material for a diving compressor. (wont take heat). You can fit a couple dozen crunched up plastic ocery bags in one of them. Plus the stuff tastes good and will disguise water that doesnt taste great.
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