Tips for Owning a Boat, liveaboards, etc - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 08-31-2006
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 106 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Tips for Owning a Boat, liveaboards, etc

Here is a partial list of things I have learned since owning a boat, living aboard, etc. It is Very partial, but just things that had rolled off my head. Everyone can feel free to chime in. Many of these are opinions... but educated opinions.

1) Bare Feet. I always recommend bare feet versus boat shoes. Personally, I think bare feet grip better. My wife interrupted me and said she likes shoes better (easier on her toes). However, with bare feet, you can feel when you are slipping, versus just start slipping with boat shoes. The exception of course is if it is cold. You have no choice.

2) Boat shoes. I always love it when people wear their boat shoes everywhere then come on their boat and wonder why they do not grip. One good walk through the parkinglot and you will pick up oil, etc and they do not work well anymore. I keep one pair of shoes for the boat (yes, boat shoes... it really does make a differnce) and one pair for off the boat. I especially love boat sandles. I have NOT noticed a slip difference b/t good off-brands and Sperry.

3) Anchor Snubber. If you have a all chain rode, or even if you do not, you can buy a large snubber to take the "jerk" out of it. I truthfully only use this on my all chain rode, not rope rode, as it does not really "jerk" much. Basically, take a short piece of line and thread through as you would normally. Get two SS hooks that fit across the chain. Make a loop in the chain and connect the two. Thus: anchor snubber. You will want to lash on one side of the snubber so that if it comes loose, it does not dissapear in the drink.

4) Dink Snubber. Use a snubber permanently wound with the painter to keep the painter from jamming the rail in seas.

5) Motoring into slip. Don't be ginger with the controls when motoring. Don't be afraid to give it some gas. Keep enough speed for headway. Watch out for prop walk... which is a very good thing in my opinion as it helps you get into tight places.

6) Sea cocks. Prudence says that you always close your sea cocks everytime you leave the boat. Reality is that most people do not. Regardless, I work my sea cocks (open/shut) as part of my monthly maintenance. I personally only leave open the ones that have to stay open (Air conditioner).

7) Water in the bilge. It is not unusual to have water in bilge. However, pour a bit of bilge cleaner in there periodiically (especially before you go sailing). Try to keep you bilge as clean as possible. PS You should know where your water is coming from.

8) Batteries. Pour distilled water in your batteries. Check the level at least monthly. Especially in warm climates, you will be amazed how quickly you can go through the water.

9) Dink and davits. I typically keep my dink on the davits, except when going offshore. Many do not. I will say that when you get into seas, the dink will slam around a lot on the davits if it is not lashed securely. However you will lose about a knot or so pulling your dink... depending on weight, seas, wind, etc.

10) Toilet paper. Use marine grade TP. Charmin (et all) seems to clump up and has not done well for us... especially on electric heads.

11) Glass Bottles. This is one of those educated opinions: They have no place on a boat. They don't store well, they don't pack well (trash), and the first time one breaks and you have to pick it out of your feet, you will agree.

12) Sun Burns. You can get them even being under your bimini all day. No substitute for lots of sunscreen. We carry aloe vera (for burns). It works pretty well, but there is no cure-all.

13) Cuts, etc. Always carry a good First Aid kit with lots of polysporin. Sea shells, sea urchins, and many other salt water critters will leave a nasty, infected cut.

14) Winch handles. Always, always carry a spare DOWN BELOW.

15) Life Jackets. Those orange things are great for CGuard Inspections, but are not worth a crud for anything else short of sinking. Mustang makes a great one for kids (with crotch strap, head float, etc) and if you can stomach the price, Sospenders autoinflates with harness are worth the money. They are comfortable and you will actually wear them.

16) Dock lines. Carry two dock lines on your boat (25' long) for tossing to the attendant at gas dock, etc. Make them easily accessible. Also, there really is a difference in good dock lines versus the cheapies. New England is our favorite.

17) Cutting line. When cutting line, first wrap it a couple of times with duct tape. Then cut through the middle of the tape. Then take your lighter (we use an aim flame) to burn both ends. If you do not, it will unravel quickly.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 08-31-2006
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 14,604
Thanks: 67
Thanked 179 Times in 175 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
Lot's of good stuff there, 'Dad.

As to cutting lines - we have lately been using an old butter knife - thoroughly heat it up on the stove and melt your way through the line - saves the open flame/burning rope thing later. Much like the rope vendors do with their heated bar. Large diameter lines may need two tries as the knife cools.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 08-31-2006
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 106 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Many thanks Faster.

Everyone can feel free to throw some on there. These were just the ones that popped into my head.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 08-31-2006
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: subject to change
Posts: 1,264
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
eryka is on a distinguished road
Nice thread!

* salt towels: 2 bath towels for each person. one is FRESH WATER ONLY, like after a shower. one is for drying off after swimming. the salt water makes the salt towel crusty & doesn't dry completely - first time you use your salt one aftert a shower you'll become a believer. in the long run, having 2 towels saves fresh water.

* cardboard: kept too long in the humid environment, cardboard will leat the weevil and roach eggs in it hatch (ewww!). take food out of its packaging and store in plastic bags or cannisters, then get rid of the cardboard ASAP.

* pfd 'policies' - sometimes it seems easier especially for kids to accept, simple rules - e.g., you must wear a pfd if you leave the cockpit, or if there's whitecaps. after dark or in bad weather, you're clipped in. period.

* seacocks - memorize the location of every one of these on the boat. for couples or multiple owners, everyone! needs to know these.

I agree about boat shoes used as street shoes, but I'll disagree with you on bare feet tho - stubbed toes are too much of a risk with all the hardware on deck. "Deckrunner" socks make a great compromise.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 08-31-2006
Gene T's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Left Coast USA
Posts: 666
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Gene T is on a distinguished road
1. no to the bare feet, break a toe or cut your foot once and you will agree.

2. When boat shoes dry out and quit gripping the deck you can refresh them by rubbing the sole with alcohol.

5. you must have a full keel heavy boat. Use the opposite for lighter displacement fin/spade boats. Slow is great, you can creep about and still have lots of maneuverability. I generally feel you can't go too slow.

6. The only sea **** I close is for the engine. Closing this one on fresh water cooled engines is not as important. Hang the engine key on the sea **** handle so you won't forget to open it.

10. Cheap TP works as well as any marine brand. Expensive TP is stronger and breaks down slower.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 08-31-2006
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,878
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Lets see...here's a few more...
Check all intake water filters bi-weekly (A/C, Fridge, engine)

Check all zincs monthly...engine heat exchanger and oil cooler, same on generator and of course shaft zincs.

Even when plugged into the dock, excercise the batteries by dropping to 50% charge once every couple of weeks and re-charge to full.

Pay attention to the weather even when at the dock.

Use a Weems/Plath Course Protractor for plotting instead of parallel rules...way easier and faster!

Spares,Spares,Spares...when you're going out cruising nothing is more important after your safety gear than having spares for everything that is critical. GPS's, Anchors, Complete engine major spare kit, lots of filter spares, bulbs & wire, hoses of every type, pumps for water, bilge, head rebuild kits, sealants, and of course lots of duct tape!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 08-31-2006
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 106 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
"Cow Catcher"

Many new sailors and older salts that enjoy their rum will benefit from what we call a cow-catcher.

Take a heavy line and rig it into 'V' with one side tied to each side of the dock and the point of the V about 6-10 feet short of the end. Rig the point with another line tied into the end of the dock. Inside the point of the V, use a large fender.

When you come into the slip a little faster than you should, the V will catch the bow (versus the end of the dock).

Hope that makes sense. I will say it has helped us before... especially when my wife drives.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 08-31-2006
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: subject to change
Posts: 1,264
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
eryka is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad
Many new sailors and older salts that enjoy their rum will benefit from what we call a cow-catcher.

Take a heavy line and rig it into 'V' with one side tied to each side of the dock and the point of the V about 6-10 feet short of the end. Rig the point with another line tied into the end of the dock. Inside the point of the V, use a large fender.

When you come into the slip a little faster than you should, the V will catch the bow (versus the end of the dock).

Hope that makes sense. I will say it has helped us before... especially when my wife drives.
Note that these only work on floating docks, or fixed docks with no tidal changes. And about that crack about your wife driving ... for the record, generally I helm coming into or out ofthe slip - we put the muscle fending the bow, and the finesse at the wheel ...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 08-31-2006
Dewey Benson's Avatar
old cranky salt
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: San Diego
Posts: 342
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Dewey Benson is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene T

5. you must have a full keel heavy boat. Use the opposite for lighter displacement fin/spade boats. Slow is great, you can creep about and still have lots of maneuverability. I generally feel you can't go too slow.

6. The only sea **** I close is for the engine. Closing this one on fresh water cooled engines is not as important. Hang the engine key on the sea **** handle so you won't forget to open it.
On item #5. Disagree on several points with an explanation. Your assumption of keel/displacement is ill concieved. Heavy displacement full keel boats require LESS speed as they carry much further and are harder to stop by reversing the engine (it's that ole mass inertia thingy). This being said lets address docking conditions and speed required to effect an easy docking.

Everything depends on wind and current conditions. Each boat will have it's own unique handling characteristics. You will need to act acordingly.

No wind/current: slow as she goes.

Wind and or current: enough speed to manuever.

Anyone who has made a perfectly lovely approach and suddenly have his bow fall off due to wind abeam can vouch for this.

6. Not excercising your sea cocks is a recipe for disaster.

Dewey
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 08-31-2006
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 106 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Yes (re types of docks they work on) and you really have to have a typical slip and not four pilings sticking out of the water. But if you can do it, it is a nice way to save the gell coat!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Seakindly Boats vs.the rest rmf1643 Boat Review and Purchase Forum 14 04-10-2013 03:26 PM
Windward performance deseely General Discussion (sailing related) 21 04-01-2012 02:42 PM
New name (I know, I know) owlmtn Boat Review and Purchase Forum 13 12-13-2009 07:46 PM
Cape Fear 38 goduke Boat Review and Purchase Forum 24 06-21-2008 11:30 AM
Boat purchase wannasail Boat Review and Purchase Forum 2 01-15-2002 03:11 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:11 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.