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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #11  
Old 09-04-2006
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I asked sorta this same question on another thread because as a somewhat beginner, it's hard to know where the line is between guts and sense. It's easy when it comes to stuff like tv and a microwave, no of course I don't need or even want those. But when it comes to stuff like radar on an offshore trip, it's harder to know what you can get away with. One wants to sail both ballsy and intellegently.


"Be bold and mighty forces will come to your aid." -Goethe.

Either that or mother nature will send a storm that will sink your boat.


I say go for it. You will always wonder if you don't give it a shot, and when you succeed you will be psyched.
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  #12  
Old 09-04-2006
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IMHO, radar is a luxury, especially on a smaller sailboat, where the power requirements are harder to meet. Of course, if you sail in areas, like the Gulf of Maine, where fog is a constant companion, then it rises from being a luxury to being a semi-necessary device.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #13  
Old 09-04-2006
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Taking a 22-anything transpacific is a bit of heubris, especially since pacific long-term weathercasting wasn't as good in 1970 as it is now.

Navigation wasn't limited to sextant then, RDF was common and if I was "looking" for Hawaii I'd use RDF as well as a sextant. It still works today. Considering that even "casual" sextant use can get you a five-mile position circle at sea (if the wx gods are kind!) and that the Hawaian Islands are much larger than that, AND blessed by a wicked tall number of volcano peaks...I don't think they're a small target.

Certainly a larger and safer target than, say, Bermuda. With or without GPS.

(And besides, even in 1970 you could follow the jet contrails heading into Hawaii. No on-board electronics needed.)
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  #14  
Old 09-04-2006
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Possibly advertisement and advertisement masked as articles has conditioned the modern day sailor to believe one needs more than a solid hull, rig and rigging, and cow sense to prepare for a voyage. We are a tenatious lot. Basically sailing and sailors have not changed. The perception as fed by media is a new ingredient though. Add to that those would be experts with no real experience and you have the ideal marketing medium where the decieved become the decievers. I do agree there is alot to be said for effort towards comfort and safety, but catching every pink elephant that may fall from the sky?? As for fear.....don't ask for more days in your life, but more life in your days.
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Old 09-04-2006
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Taking a 22 ft. boat across oceans even with high seamanship and navgation skills, still carries an element of risk most of us would not find acceptable. I would use the tragic death today of the "Crocodile Hunter" to illustrate the point that when you put yourself in dangerous situations...skill counts a lot and luck counts perhaps even more.
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Old 09-04-2006
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I'm not saying that going on a bluewater voyage in a 22' boat is an ideal situation. But, I would argue that you don't need to have a fully-equipped 36'+ boat, with two GPS chartplotters, radar, EPIRB, SSB, refrigerator, genset, watermaker, 42" LCD flat screen HDTV with gyro stabilized satellite dish, and all that to make the voyage either.

Some of the safety gear and navigation gear makes sense to have aboard. An EPIRB and GPS are reasonably low cost and very reliable, so going without doesn't really make much sense. But a lot of the other stuff are really just luxuries, that have little, if anything, to do with the ability of the boat to cross oceans.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #17  
Old 09-04-2006
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I would like to personally thank Jim H for providing Sailing Dog yet another opportunity to call someone stupid! Sailing Dog: Since you are such a knowledgeable and experienced sailor, why don't you take a 22 foot boat across the Pacific with just a Sextant. No GPS and no Radar. And no Sailnet.
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Old 09-04-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gc
A nice downwind, trade winds passage in a Columbia 22 seems like a reasonable thing to me. With modern weather forecasting the likelyhood of encountering really bad weather on that route is pretty small.
Did you read the initial post? The guy claims he sailed the Columbia 22 to Hawaii and back two seperate times. Not only that, he did it 30-some-odd years ago, before the casual sailor had weather forecasting services available to him.

Roundtrip to Hawaii and back on a 22-foot boat built for Southern California with a crew of four does not sound "like a reasonable thing" to me.
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Old 09-04-2006
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28.5 Irwin count? No Radar, No GPS, no SSB, I did have a compass, a clock and a sextant. I did not cross the Pacific but I did get the boat to the Marshall Islands. Oh by the way I started from Florida. As far as I know the boat is still there.

I fail to see where Dog called anyone stupid. I will let him nail ya he's a big boy.

Fair Winds
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Old 09-04-2006
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The polynesians dint need no steeenkin' sextant or compass!!!
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