MacGregor 26 X/M Impressions - Page 10 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #91  
Old 12-16-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 14
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
eric3a is on a distinguished road
Thanks.
Long post indeed but it felt like no one in this thread had assembled all the reasons that made this boat interesting to me despite it's possible short comings.
I think -as a sailor- I am still a little surprised that this weird boat ended up being top choice for my requirements, but logically the boat makes a lot of sense for what I want to do.

Trying to find a boat lift installer for my house. The boat is in good shape and it's be a shame to have it scrape on oysters during the very low tides.

Once I have more experience on the 26X I'll report back or meanwhile if anyone wants to ask anything I'll try and answer.
Eric
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #92  
Old 12-16-2006
genius's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Springfield, Illinois
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
genius is on a distinguished road
And situations are exactly what MacGregors are about. Everyone discusses that that aren't good sailboats: true. Everyone discusses that they aren't good powerboats: true. But very few people ever cover why a person buys a MacGregor.

I had a Catalina 22 for about six years. Wonderful boat; served my family well. Major headache to get boat rigged and launched. Could have been great with a lower trailer and a mast-raising system. As it was, we kept it on our local lake in a slip. Very handy, very easy, and after a couple of years, very boring: you can only look at the same scenery so long.

We wanted to travel. We wanted to go on rivers. We wanted to broaden our horizons. Has it cost us? Yes, the MacGregor 26X doesn't sail as sweetly. The boat is significantly faster under power, though. That allows us to go to some places that wouldn't have been possible with the Catalina.

If you want to become an efficient sailor, or if you want to race sailboats (something of an oxymoron to me), buy a different boat; a MacGregor will not make you happy. If you want a sailboat to simply be out sailing and you don't care where you are or what scenery you are seeing, get a different boat; you can find a cheaper used Catalina 22 (they are all about $3000-$5000). If you want to impress others at the yacht club, keep spending; the only way to impress is to outspend. Then, they are simply impressed with your stupidity to spend.

If you want to take your family water camping, sail in some places they'll remember when they've grown, see some sights you may never return to again in this life, power out of some storms you'd rather not sail through, and have some piece of mind that the boat won't sink and leave your family adrift (if there is any truth in advertising), get a MacGregor. Don't compare it to a J/Boat; compare it to a Winnebago. That's much closer to reality.

As for the quality question, again it's what your expectations are. I drive Chevys; I don't expect Mercedes comfort. I expect a pretty reliable drivetrain, and I haven't been disappointed. I own a MacGregor, I don't expect it to be built like an Island Packet. I have hit a river buoy (don't ask), and the boat only had a minor scratch. So, is it indestructible? I doubt it, but it'll do. What will I do in over thirty knots of wind? I'll get off the water. I'm a fair-weather sailor, and I have no need to prove otherwise to anyone. It's a hobby, not a proof of testosterone.

In summary, so far, we've enjoyed it. Time will tell. Ignore others' opinions; don't let the bastards get you down.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #93  
Old 12-16-2006
Owner, Green Bay Packers
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: SW Michigan
Posts: 10,318
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
Thanks Kermie! The reason I suggested Nifty's was that if resolved this reasonably, they have the best Reuben sandwich in the whole wide world. Lunch is on me!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #94  
Old 12-16-2006
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 2,394
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 11
cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough
I'm glad, really glad that people have got the perfect boat for them. You got what makes sense for "y'all" and it works for you.

Isn't that the reason we're on the water?
__________________
We are not primarily on earth to see through one another, but to see one another through

Some people are like slinkies: not really good for anything... but you can't help laughing when you push them down the stairs
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #95  
Old 12-18-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Scottme is on a distinguished road
Quote:
"The Mac 26X is designed to appeal to a specific niche of the boat-buying market, i.e., the person who can't decide whether he wants to be a sailor or a power boater. Generally, they aren't very experienced with either type of boat."
Thats not the experience I've had around Mac owners at all. Yes, there are new sailors and inexperienced ones that own Macs also, however I'd say that most of the Mac owners I've met were very experienced sailors.

As for not being able to decide wether they want to be sailors or power boaters, "whatever." I find the novelty of haveing a 40 pony motor hanging off of my transom quite comforting. When the wind dies at 4pm and the temps shoot up to 100 deg, I'll motor over to a cove and swim and when I'm done I'll tow 1 or more "real sailors" back to their slips.

That comment is like saying a guy that owns a Cessna cant decide if he wants to be a hang glider or a real pilot. Cause after all a Cessna's just a little puddle jumper and you cant really travel in it. But the only Cessna owner I know is a commercial airline pilot and has flown A-10's over the gulf in 3 tours.

I'm not trolling and dont really appreciate flames, thats not my intent. But I've been sailing for near 50 years, owned a real sailboat for 30+ years and a Mac for around 10. I'd put my resume against near anyones and I like my Mac.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #96  
Old 01-13-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 14
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
eric3a is on a distinguished road
I realize it's been a long time since this thread was first opened, but I thought after 2 years of 26X ownership I'd review my actual usage against anticipated use, as posted then. I hope this may assist anyone considering a 26X or similar (26M or even Hunter edge?).

1) Shallow draft:
No doubt the best feature of the boat. All up draft is 9 inches, and motor only draft is about 18 inches. I sail in muddy waters and would allow a lot more in rocky bottoms.
I've often gone into local anchorages with almost no water, and gone out just by letting the boat drift back to deep waters. We can squeeze in bayous and the flat bottom allows for easy straight level grounding in the mud at low tide.
Very often small power day boats and fishing boats try and come close to us to ask if we're OK, only to find out how shallow our anchorage is before we can wave them away. One advantage of such shallow anchorages is how safe they are at night: No risk of anyone running into us!

Being able to keep the boat at the house means we use it a lot, often on the spur of the moment. The boat is always ready to go, and we often end up having dinner onboard, or overnight just for the fun of it.

2) Price:
It's a cheap boat. It can be seen as good and bad.
I probably spent about 5K all inclusive to upgrade a number of things, about half of that on creature comforts. Turned out to have been a great idea since a lot of these were "dual use" for shore camping and hurricane backup. More on that later.
The other half went on rudders, huge wheel, all lines back to cockpit, asym, 3rd reef in main, storm sail, double main sheet to act as traveller, etc...

3) Cabin:
It's huge for a 26 footer. The ugly box shape means lots of volume. Not enough storage options, so we put in a number of cloth pockets all over the boat. The interior feels open and airy and is very low maintenance.
The aft berth is huge, and a good place in the winter. Not enough ventilation in the summer.
I don't really need a cabin, but my wife is hooked on it now and that's a great result. She always loved fast sailing on our previous boats, so now I'm sure she'll be game for a fast AND comfortable boat. I'm game, even if I'd prefer empty crazy fast sailboats.

4)Motor:
I usually put-put at about 6knots / 2200 rpms on the 50HP. With 24 gallons on board, range is huge. The engine is way too powerful for my needs, but once in a while I'll open up just to get to an anchorage before sunset (mosquitoes). Or get home in time to open my office in the morning.
I dont' like the noise/smoke/smell, so slow speed is my preferred option.
The power is useful for maneuvering and the boat may be difficult for some to handle due to flat bottom and high windage. In deep waters, board and rudders make a big difference. In shallow waters when you can't keep centerboard and rudders down, the boat drifts and I personally have fun playing with the maneuvers. But in that mode it definitely isn't for beginners and I shudder to think of a beginner in a marina or trying to get back on trailer like that.

4)
a) Sailing: On this board I'd be remiss not to give a quick opinion on that.
The boat sails like it looks. No surprise. I changed the original rudders (horrible!) to custom ones for about $500 and they make a huge difference. Took the slop out of the various rudder linkages also to get some accuracy in rudders. Much better now.
The boat is easy to sail but doesn't give much feedback or impressions. Having a wheel on a 26 footer is a silly idea, but needed because of the engine. I tend to sail with empty ballast when alone (NOT RECOMMENDED and against owner's manual instructions). Don't do it unless you're OK with the capsize risk. I believe I know what I'm doing and am fine with the risk. Under asym spinnaker you get the boat to move eventually as the boat is light.
With wife on board I fill the ballast in. In light air it kills the speed, but the safety is worth it. You get a slow cruiser and the water flow coming out of the flat stern is horrible.
Upwind performance is cruiserish. (I'm skewed from my racing days!)
The boat is easy to balance and easy to singlehand.
You know when buying it it's not a racer, and you can cruise nicely, gently, and simply enjoy it. Sailing can be just about that too! I bore easily though.
Hull shape isn't good in chop, especially beating in the wind. Bear down and you can get it to surf down the waves, centerboard up.
It livens up in 15 knots at 110deg from the wind, but then if your sailboat doesn't you're sailing a clothing iron.
I haven't taken the boat offshore and dont' intend to.
I got caught a few times on the periphery of summer thunderstorms, with strong gusts and the boat does OK.

5) Been there. Done that.
I added a couple new things to the list since that post and a new trophy on my fireplace mantle.
As to the 26X: My wife and I executed our hurricane plan as IKE approached Galveston Bay and evacuated our our boat. 11 lines and 3 anchors and we rode it out. No biggie, but it was a cool experience. Unfortunately many people suffered really badly.
We were happy and lucky to save our boat as we weren't sure our house would still be there. Luckily the house didn't suffer and barely escaped the flood by literally inches: The insulation underneath got wet! And it sits at 23 feet elevation!

We didn't have power (nor sewage) for 12 days, so having all the camping gear from the boat (generator, portable shower, airhead toilet, etc...) was great as we were able to camp in good comfort while we worked on clearing debris, rebuilding the dock, boat lift, deck, yard, and so on.

All in all the 26X fits the bill for the intended use and within the known limitations I would recommend it.
I wouldn't use it offshore. It's forte is good camping in sheltered waters and shallow bays in my opinion.

If you sail deep waters you have a lot more (and better) choices in my opinion, especially in the current second-hand boat market. Unless you want to trailer your boat... Not something I know anything, or care about.

Still wondering if there's another boat our there that would fit the bill better, but anytime one comes close, the price doesn't.
Viva Yacht 32 is on the list.
Gemini 105 also.
And a number of larger tris.
All shallow draft, nice cabin and they'd sail a lot better than the 26X. But a lot more money.

Eric
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #97  
Old 01-14-2009
patrickstickler's Avatar
Rhumbunctious
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Espoo, Finland
Posts: 150
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
patrickstickler is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by eric3a View Post
... Unless you want to trailer your boat... Not something I know anything, or care about.
Firstly, I concur with everything Eric has posted. I happily and proudly sail a 2001 26X and share all of Eric's appreciations for its shallow draft, large cabin, big outboard, etc.

As for trailering, I can perhaps add a bit to what Eric has otherwise covered very well. Trailering opens up so many opportunities that would not be available otherwise. We've towed ours to many lakes in Texas, Arkansas, and all the way from Texas to Florida to sail the Atlantic coast around Cocoa Beach, as well as some nice lakes in Central Florida, including motoring along the Saint Johns River, etc. And all in comfort, and with a familiar boat, and very cheaply.

Not to mention that we have often used the boat as a camper, staying in a campground, just like an RV, even on trips that included no boating whatsoever.

And while we primarily sail, and consider it a sailboat, our kids *love* tubing and wakeboarding behind it, even though it's not a speedboat, and it adds yet another fun activity to an already fun filled trip.

We love our 26X so much, that when we recently moved from Texas to Finland last Fall, we took it with us! and we are eagerly looking forward to sailing the Baltic and Finnish archepelego as soon as the ice melts -- for which the boat is absolutely ideal, given the boat's shallow draft and the nature of the rocky coastlines. And even better, we'll be able to just trailer it down to the Med, or over to Norway, or inland to the Saimaa Lake region, etc. And can spend a month motoring the canals of France and Germany, etc. etc. etc. etc.

The range of possibilities this boat offers is amazing. In a word *versatility*.

No, it's not a racer. No it's not full of teak. No it doesn't have an inch thick hull. No it's not an offshore boat. Blah blah blah. But it's a decent boat, for an affordable price, when fairly evaluated, and as with Eric, I know of no other boat that could possibly allow us to sail as often, in as many places, in as much comfort than our MacGregor. I've looked. I'm always one to upgrade to something else that better meets our needs or better fits our dreams. I've not found anything that, for the price (which for many of us is not a small deal), comes close.

I often dream of a bigger, better, faster, ocean capable boat that I can sail around the world and have no illusions about the limitations and quirks of my MacGregor, but I think that those who "talk trash" about MacGregors simply "don't get it".

So when you folks with bigger, better, faster, prettier, ... boats are stuck in a particular spot, and having to either spend weeks getting somewhere different or charter an unfamiliar boat to get a change of pace, we'll be enjoying our familiar and capable boat, which we know how to sail well and know every bolt and line, and we'll be sailing in more varied locations in the course of a year than most do in a decade, if not a lifetime.

It's something you either "get", or you don't. Other MacGregor owners will know what I mean.
__________________
...
If a man speaks at sea where there is no woman to hear, is he still wrong?
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

-
Cruising the Baltic in 'Merihiisi', a 1979 Westerly Berwick Ketch

Last edited by patrickstickler; 01-14-2009 at 07:09 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #98  
Old 01-14-2009
N0NJY's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Colorado
Posts: 795
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
N0NJY is on a distinguished road
Quote:
I often dream of a bigger, better, faster, ocean capable boat that I can sail around the world and have no illusions about the limitations and quirks of my MacGregor, but I think that those who "talk trash" about MacGregors simply "don't get it".
Anyone that talks trash about someone else's boat "doesn't get it".

There's too many bigots around sometimes.

I looked at the Macs when I bought my Macgregor. Oh, mine is an old one. Not one of the newer boats. It has a weighted keel that cranks down, instead of using water ballast (I didn't want a boat that used that system).

Mine is for practicing and learning - nothing more. When I'm done with it, I'll either donate it to the Boy Scouts, someone in my family or I'll keep it around for when I'm back in Colorado.

Eventually we're getting a bigger boat for cruising - but this one is for learning.

Period.
__________________
Rick Donaldson, NØNJY

moˈloːn laˈbe!

It's better to be hated for who you are, than to be loved for who you're not.

Let those winds of change blow over my head,
I'd rather die while I'm living than live while I'm dead - Jimmy Buffet
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #99  
Old 01-14-2009
patrickstickler's Avatar
Rhumbunctious
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Espoo, Finland
Posts: 150
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
patrickstickler is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by N0NJY View Post
Anyone that talks trash about someone else's boat "doesn't get it".

There's too many bigots around sometimes.
I couldn't agree more.

I've always found it interesting that Macs seem to get "picked on" alot more than most other boats, and have concluded that, as with many other facets of life, there are alot of folks who simply can't deal objectively and fairly with things that are significantly different from what they are familiar with, and anything that diverges too far from their own personal scope of experience must be "bad" or "wrong" rather than simply less optimal for their particular needs or preferences while yet possibly perfect for someone else's.

Because the Mac is a boat with alot of atypical characteristics, and to a great extent, is "an aquired taste", it perhaps has a higher tendency to "offend" such folks, who must force everything to fit their own overly narrow personal model and since the Mac simply defies easy classification, it suffers far more criticism and dismissal than boats that are more traditional, or typical, in most of their facets.

One has to want or need the Mac's special qualities in order to be content to live with its quirks. It also needs to be sailed a bit differently than your typical cruiser, and anyone who tries to sail it like they would many other boats will not get the best performance out of it and probably not have the best experience.

Anyway, here's to us all getting the greatest possible enjoyment out of whatever boat we have ;-)
__________________
...
If a man speaks at sea where there is no woman to hear, is he still wrong?
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

-
Cruising the Baltic in 'Merihiisi', a 1979 Westerly Berwick Ketch

Last edited by patrickstickler; 01-14-2009 at 11:38 AM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #100  
Old 01-14-2009
WouldaShoulda's Avatar
AEOLUS II
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: From The Land of Pleasant Living
Posts: 2,824
Thanks: 3
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 7
WouldaShoulda is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by N0NJY View Post
There's too many bigots around sometimes.

Descrimination based upon race, color, creed, gender, national origin, sexual orientation, age, handicap or MAC ownership is strictly prohibited!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:06 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.