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post #1 of 53 Old 03-20-2016 Thread Starter
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First Asym Try

Had some fun moments yesterday trying out my asym for the first time. Hope nobody was watching as I created a near perfect hour glass on the first haul. Fixed that but still never really got it flying right. Being along was part of the challenge but I was wondering how much difference a dousing sock would make. I don't have one at this point. So for those with more experience is a snuffer worth the investment or is there a different haul/retrieve method for those of us without a sock? Thanks.

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post #2 of 53 Old 03-20-2016
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Re: First Asym Try

I don't think a sock is going to prove worth it. It may make it easier to learn, but once you know what you are doing with it they go up pretty easy.

I am not sure what you did, so I can't diagnose what you did wrong. But the general process is from a beat.

1) pull the tack line all the way out
2) bear away while easing the main but keep the jib in tight.
3) hoist the spin outside the jib
4) sheet in the spin and get it flying
5) drop the jib

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Re: First Asym Try

Dousing socks make a big difference.

Without a sock: In heavy air -blanket the sail, release the tack and pull the sail down while easing the halyard. In really light air - ease the halyard and stuff the sail into the turtle.

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post #4 of 53 Old 03-20-2016
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Re: First Asym Try

I would just haul mine from the bag and pack it back in after dousing, clews first leaving the sheets out for last I would tie the head to the bag closure so its easy to find. Rig the sheets (its been a while) so maybe the one you need only first hoist and get the second one run. They don't work as well DDW so head up a bit. Light wind days are fun to see how far up you can go before it curls. Boom on the lee side is tricky don't do it without a preventer with enough line to let the boom over, ask me how I know.
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post #5 of 53 Old 03-20-2016
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Re: First Asym Try

I raced foredeck for more than 25 years which certainly affects my opinions.

On my own boat I flew my spinnakers without a sock for five or six years. I now have a sock.

In my experience the total amount of work is slightly greater WITH a sock than WITHOUT a sock. Most of that is because of the weight getting the sail on and off the deck, even if you can launch through a foredeck hatch as I do. The real benefit is that gybing is easier and the failure modes are reduced. There are always things that can go wrong but managing events is easier with a sock, and the absolute worst failure unique to a sock (the sock jamming) is no worse than you would have to deal with absent the sock. Do not let the retrieval line get away from you. I have to deal with a wet sail less often with a sock.

I'm not sure I'd spend the money on one again but I don't regret having one.

This probably doesn't help you much, does it? *grin*
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post #6 of 53 Old 03-20-2016
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Re: First Asym Try

I also use a sock, and agree that it makes things easier, especially for a singlehander. I think it becomes increasingly useful in proportion to the size of the boat and the age of the sailor. The bigger the boat and the older the sailor, the harder everything becomes.
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Re: First Asym Try

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Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
I raced foredeck for more than 25 years which certainly affects my opinions.

On my own boat I flew my spinnakers without a sock for five or six years. I now have a sock.

In my experience the total amount of work is slightly greater WITH a sock than WITHOUT a sock. Most of that is because of the weight getting the sail on and off the deck, even if you can launch through a foredeck hatch as I do. The real benefit is that gybing is easier and the failure modes are reduced. There are always things that can go wrong but managing events is easier with a sock, and the absolute worst failure unique to a sock (the sock jamming) is no worse than you would have to deal with absent the sock. Do not let the retrieval line get away from you. I have to deal with a wet sail less often with a sock.

I'm not sure I'd spend the money on one again but I don't regret having one.

This probably doesn't help you much, does it? *grin*
Skipper put me on foredeck once and put me back in the cockpit right away said I was to slow. Relative for sure, its the "special teams" of sailing. Probably not much help either.
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Re: First Asym Try

We fly one without a sock.. in light air I'll drop it into the bag on the foredeck, in the lee of the main if necessary. In heavier air, we ease the tack line (we use our spin pole downhaul as the tack line - it's led aft to the cockpit) and douse the sail in the lee of the main, under the boom and down the companionway, then repack it later. The entire douse is done from the cockpit. It does take some practice, esp in coordination of easing the tack line and then the halyard at a rate that the 'stuffer' can manage.

We do find gybing an asymm more problematic than the symmetrical with the pole - but we've been flying a symm for decades. I can see the benefit of a sock during a shorthanded gybe.. snuff, gybe main, and redeploy the asymm. Far less potential for sailing over a lazy sheet and getting all tangled up.

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Re: First Asym Try

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Originally Posted by Sailormon6 View Post
The bigger the boat and the older the sailor, the harder everything becomes.
*sigh* Which is why I now sail tactician and alternate helmsman.

No matter how much I'd like to be up there I know better. I've also told too many people the story of facing down someone from the afterguard who came up to "help" who saw the look in my eye and decided I really meant it when I told him to get behind the mast or I'd toss him over the side. *grin* There was only room for one person to fix the broken shackle on the bow and my guy was going as fast as possible.

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Skipper put me on foredeck once and put me back in the cockpit right away said I was to slow. Relative for sure, its the "special teams" of sailing. Probably not much help either.
We're used to hearing "you guys are killing me up there" from the afterguard.

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We fly one without a sock.. in light air I'll drop it into the bag on the foredeck, in the lee of the main if necessary. In heavier air, we ease the tack line (we use our spin pole downhaul as the tack line - it's led aft to the cockpit) and douse the sail in the lee of the main, under the boom and down the companionway, then repack it later. The entire douse is done from the cockpit. It does take some practice, esp in coordination of easing the tack line and then the halyard at a rate that the 'stuffer' can manage.
And that, ladies and gentlemen, is how it's done.

Alone (except for Sven the autopilot) and standing in the cockpit I run the spinnaker halyard under one foot; by shifting my weight back and forth I can control how fast the sail comes down as I use the sheet to pull the spinnaker under the boom and stuff it below. I ease the tack line in segments. I tried the halyard under one foot and the tack line under the other but that got WAY too complicated.

Make sure no fasteners protrude from the boom or vang and tape all your cotter pins. I am not a fan of ring dings.

sail fast and eat well, dave S/V Auspicious

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Re: First Asym Try

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Originally Posted by SVAuspicious View Post
*sigh* Which is why I now sail tactician and alternate helmsman.

No matter how much I'd like to be up there I know better. I've also told too many people the story of facing down someone from the afterguard who came up to "help" who saw the look in my eye and decided I really meant it when I told him to get behind the mast or I'd toss him over the side. *grin* There was only room for one person to fix the broken shackle on the bow and my guy was going as fast as possible.



We're used to hearing "you guys are killing me up there" from the afterguard.



And that, ladies and gentlemen, is how it's done.

Alone (except for Sven the autopilot) and standing in the cockpit I run the spinnaker halyard under one foot; by shifting my weight back and forth I can control how fast the sail comes down as I use the sheet to pull the spinnaker under the boom and stuff it below. I ease the tack line in segments. I tried the halyard under one foot and the tack line under the other but that got WAY too complicated.

Make sure no fasteners protrude from the boom or vang and tape all your cotter pins. I am not a fan of ring dings.
Those of us working the foredeck used the saying "this is your brain....this is your brain in the cockpit" all too often.
"We're going to Gybe set"....so we get everything set and then...."no wait, let's do a bear away" (as we are 4 boat lengths from the mark....). This was all with a symetrical spin on a 42 footer. It was a happy day when I had trained my replacement on the foredeck and went and got stupid in the cockpit.
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