traveler:cabin top or cockpit? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 11-07-2006
bestfriend's Avatar
Hitchin' a ride
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: In my mind, I live in Oslo
Posts: 3,191
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
bestfriend is a jewel in the rough bestfriend is a jewel in the rough bestfriend is a jewel in the rough
traveler:cabin top or cockpit?

I am looking at two similar 1989 Tartan 34-2s. One has the traveler on top and the other has it in the cockpit right in front of the pulpit. What differences would I expect in sailing?
Thanks!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 11-07-2006
sanctuarysam's Avatar
purveyor of mischief
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: in front of my computer, how 'bout you
Posts: 533
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
sanctuarysam will become famous soon enough
near and dear to my heart

this is a subject that helped decide which boats stayed or fell off my short list (S2 some C&Cs).
there are some great boats that have travelers mounted right in the path of the companionway..now,if this isn't a problem for you..or if one mounted mid cockpit (like my old J/24..great for racing..not cruiser friendly)
my bottom line..if everybody who sails on your boat is a seasoned sailor..and doesn't mind having to deal with the space limitations of having a traveler in the cockpit..i say this is the best choice..in my situation..having a coach mounted traveler, although less convenient, and i think less effective, affords more space and comfort for less experienced sailors.
i chose comfort..YMMV
__________________
By three methods we may learn wisdom: first, by reflection, which is noblest,second is by imitation, which is easiest,third is by experience, which is the bitterest.






Sam
Sanctuary, Sabre 30 mkIII
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 11-07-2006
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 14,700
Thanks: 69
Thanked 197 Times in 189 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
For pure usability and convenience, I think the traveller should be forward of the helmsman in his or her normal position (tiller steering) This way whichever tack you are one, mainsheet and traveller control lines are within easy reach of your free hand.

Travellers that are mounted aft of the cockpit are more awkward to make use of.

Mid cockpit travellers do introduce possible shin crunchers, however, but bridgedeck mounted ones generally do not. Here, however you run the risk of interfering with the companionway, and limiting options for dodgers.

My biggest beef with coach roof mounted travellers is the reduced mechanincal advantage, and added stress to the boom from a mid-boom mounted traveller. These usually end up using a winch for trimming and the winch is often under the dodger - slow and inconvenient.

So in the balance, I like a traveller that I can easily use, so forward in the cockpit, preferably on the aft edge of a bridge deck, and live with the possible inconvenience of having to slide it to one side or the other when in port.

Ours, on the bridge deck, is easily adjusted and the mainsheet has sufficient purchase to be easily adjusted. When at anchor or in port, I release a snap shackle that we installed at the mainsheet/traveller attachment and clip it the sheet to the toerail, totally clearing the cockpit area.
dbakody likes this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 11-07-2006
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 107 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Eastbay,

My personal opinion, as I have owned and run both:

1) Racing - in the cockpit. It allows the helmsman to make many corrections himself without letting go of the tiller.

2) All others - over the cabin. Witht the exception of racers, most people spend the vast majority of their time either at anchor or at the marina... why would you want to keep stepping over that thing??

These are just my opinions and experience. Others have valid points too.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 11-07-2006
sailortjk1's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Porter, IN
Posts: 4,647
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 10
sailortjk1 has a spectacular aura about sailortjk1 has a spectacular aura about
Your going to get better sail control with the traveler mounted in the cockpit and the sheet attatched further aft on the boom. The traveler itself will also be wider.

Most of today's cruising boats put the traveler on the cabin trunk to open up the cockpit, bridgedeck, and companionway.

The one compromise on our boat that I am not very fond of.

Stuck behind the wheel at the pedestal, the captain has little or no control of the main. If I want to trim the main I either have to a) ask somebody else to trim it b) put her on auto pilot, step around the wheel, and trim myself, or c) ask somebody else to take the helm while I trim it.

We normally opt for option (b). I use the auto pilot while I step around the wheel to reach the cabin trunk where the sheet terminates and where the traveler is located. Its not the best set up, but it generally works for cruising boats.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 11-07-2006
CBinRI's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 913
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
CBinRI is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by sanctuarysam
this is a subject that helped decide which boats stayed or fell off my short list (S2 some C&Cs).
there are some great boats that have travelers mounted right in the path of the companionway..now,if this isn't a problem for you..or if one mounted mid cockpit (like my old J/24..great for racing..not cruiser friendly)
my bottom line..if everybody who sails on your boat is a seasoned sailor..and doesn't mind having to deal with the space limitations of having a traveler in the cockpit..i say this is the best choice..in my situation..having a coach mounted traveler, although less convenient, and i think less effective, affords more space and comfort for less experienced sailors.
i chose comfort..YMMV
My last boat's traveler was not in the cockpit and I expected it to be much more of an issue when I bought a boat that did than it really was. It really has not been a problem at all and it is much easier to control and adjust.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 11-07-2006
bestfriend's Avatar
Hitchin' a ride
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: In my mind, I live in Oslo
Posts: 3,191
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
bestfriend is a jewel in the rough bestfriend is a jewel in the rough bestfriend is a jewel in the rough
By the way, does anyone have a Tartan 34-2 I can come look at? the ones I am interested in are out of town. Around 1989 vintage in the San Francisco Bay Area.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 11-07-2006
T37Chef's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 4,169
Thanks: 65
Thanked 28 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 8
T37Chef will become famous soon enough
Just curious while we're discussing this topic, which designs are the safest? In other words which design would be less likely to snap the boom. I'm thinking the mid boom mounted is safest. It would seem (to me ?) that if the sheet/traveler was at the aft end of the boom, in a severe jib it could stress the boom and snap...all gone.

Thoughts...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 11-07-2006
Gene T's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Left Coast USA
Posts: 666
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Gene T is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by eastbaylostboys
I am looking at two similar 1989 Tartan 34-2s. One has the traveler on top and the other has it in the cockpit right in front of the pulpit. What differences would I expect in sailing?
Thanks!
If the traveler is in front of the wheel it will be easy to adjust by the helmsman, a big plus in single handling. The loads will be less for the sheet and traveler adjust. It will cause some problems, maybe safety concerns for any crew that might get caught by the sheet in a flying jibe.

I agree with cruisingdad, and I absolutely hate having a traveler in the middle of the cockpit or in front of the companionway, it is unusable by the helmsman and in the way for the crew. I have mixed feeling about having one right in front of the wheel. I have seen cabin top mounted setups with the main sheet running back to the helmsman but don't know how well it worked.

Then there is Hunters idea of mounting the traveler on an arch above the cockpit, but the sheet still adjusts under the dodger. After sailing one I was left thinking it didn't work as well as it should have.

Safety wise there are much lower loads on the rig/boom with boom end sheeting, but crew safety is better with mid-boom sheeting, i.e. cabin top traveler mounting.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 11-07-2006
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 14,700
Thanks: 69
Thanked 197 Times in 189 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
"Just curious while we're discussing this topic, which designs are the safest?"

Mid boom sheeting provides little to no support for the part of the boom aft of the sheet attachment(s), and the reduced mechanical advantage places higher loads on the sheet itself.

As an analogy, consider a plank supported on two sawhorses, with the sawhorses close to each end, vs the same plank with one sawhorse at the end, the other in the middle. How strong is the unsupported end of the plank if you were to walk out onto it?

In a severe gybe I would think that the inertia of the sweeping boom, when caught up short by a mid boom sheeting arrangement, could carry on to snap the boom at the mainsheet point, especially with a big breeze behind it.

A spinnaker pole, if allowed to go hard against the forestay with a breeze in the sail, will be similarly unsupported beyond the forestay and can easily snap at that point.

I vote for the boom-end sheet attachment as the safer, stronger one.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Center cockpit or aft cockpit? capsbond Boat Review and Purchase Forum 11 08-09-2006 12:28 PM
reenforce fiberglass from the top? jbarros Gear & Maintenance 4 04-30-2003 10:52 AM
need help choosing a windvane for center cockpit boat! staceyneil Gear & Maintenance 0 06-22-2002 05:21 AM
Day Sailers w/large cockpit and head? Ethan_nyc Boat Review and Purchase Forum 6 07-14-2001 08:09 AM
Pinhole in Cockpit Gelcoat Cydonia Gear & Maintenance 3 04-03-2001 09:11 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:55 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.