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  #11  
Old 11-21-2006
RayMetz100's Avatar
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www.jboats.com
J/22, J/24, J/80
If you want to see the old ones, edit you address bar to read j27, j28, j29

They don't have fancy cabins, but they are known to be strong and fast.
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  #12  
Old 11-21-2006
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had a cal25 for 7yrs. loved it. it sailed well & was sturdy. know of 3 McGregor26s that turned turtle off Catalina, personally would'nt own one on a bet.
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  #13  
Old 11-21-2006
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cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough
kennya,

I hadn't wanted to even think about making that decision until I was old and feeble. Feeble minded.

besides, I'm not all that serious, and he's not that dumb.
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  #14  
Old 11-21-2006
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Just checking, you know a man need a reason to get up in the morning. I can’t think of anything better than sailing.
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  #15  
Old 11-21-2006
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I do favor the Contessa although out of my price range according to the little lady.
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  #16  
Old 11-21-2006
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Visited the Choi Lee yard in Kawloon years ago and the one I sailed was the family's. Sory for chewing up the spellin', I was in a hury
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  #17  
Old 11-21-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailormon6
I mean no offense, but with your record of mishaps and "pilot errors" maybe you should consider taking up another sport, like golf. (You should also stay away from flying and skydiving!)

I strongly suspect this thread is a joke, but, if you're serious, then I don't recommend a Catalina 27 (even though I consider it a fairly rugged small boat that sails well.) You need a boat that is built so tough that it can survive the most dire conditions, without the intervention of human intelligence.

I like to race and sail rail down as much as the next guy, but smart sailors don't habitually break boats.
A note for Sailormon6 -Senior Member - It's no joke. I need a good boat.
Tried both sports you suggest - still like sailing. With five smaller boats in my yard, two have sails (Hobie $ small mono hull) I can't give it up just yet. Once had a Cal Cat; symetrical hulls. I would paddle out to the first wind line so that I could sail to the second, which would get me to the third. Then I would jump swells, literally flying from swell to swell, using the tramp as the wing and using a "companion" (monkey) to ballance things out in the air, sometimes with swells twenty feet or more apart. Yep, you guessed it, eventuall the hulls looked like someone had tried to wring them out. As the down hull hit the weight of bodies on the up hull would cause a twisting or wringing motion. Eventually a diagonal crease appeared on each hull.

Extreme sailing became the norm after the near knock down in the "Cheoy Lee", and you had to be there. We (3 brothers) all surfed, but this was one wave we despirately tried NOT to catch. We were on our way from San Francisco to Santa Cruz. We'd left the night before, passing by the Faralons at night. I remember we tied lines around our waist when we had to go forward as it was a bit rough. The next day, with following winds and thirty foot seas, we were trying to go as slow as possible letting the swells pass under us with only a quarter of the main showing and still screaming along. When the back end raised up on one monster and we began to pick up speed we all knew it wasn't going to be pretty. We figure we were doing well in excess of 18kts as the meter was pegged out and knew we were either going to go ass over teakettle or broach when we got to the bottom. It happened fast. We broached right (that's starb'rd for you diehards) as I was hanging on by my elbow over the edge of the cockpit looking down at my brothers (I was on the high side) across from me my younger brother had his back to the cabin, knees to chest and was fully engulfed, water splitting the skylight on top, half the boom in the water, dad below, sick, watching water go over the skylight, with nothing more than my older brother's lower arm showing as his white knuckles held tightly on to the tiller.

When the boat popped back up we all looked at each other and smiled as Dad bounded from below. From that day on we were foul weather gear sailors. Oh yeah, a few broke boats here and there, but WHAT A RIDE! For he who says I should take up bowling or something "safe" you have to put things in context. You see, a year later I was in Vietnam. It was when I'd finished more than three tours and came home that I tried hang gliding, skydiving, dirt squirt'n moto-X and flying. Oh yeah, and did I mention I went back into the Reserves, first Army then Coast Guard and ended up doing a tour in the gulf in '91 and one at the Embassy in Haiti in '99? I'm retired now; kicked out on my sixtieth birthday, just a couple weeks after completing one last tour with Naval Coastal Warfare Command One in 2006, so it's time again to sail and surf, and fish, and enjoy a nice couple ounces of Gentleman Jack while watching the sun set on the Monterey Bay.

I'm not a stupid sailor. OK, so I misspelled Ketch. Hey, I was an ART MAJOR (http://geocities.com/just4steel/) for a reason, give me a break. I just like to SAIL! I'm a lot more rational when lives other than my own are at stake and I check my rigging before going out like I do a walk-around before ever leaving the ground in a plane. Prepare for the worst and expect the best. Life's too short not to live it to the fullest if possible and at 60 it's going by even faster. I don't fly cats from swell to swell any more, primarily because the stern of Hobie A-symetrical hulls don't have enough positive boyancy when flying a hull. I'm just looking for a good boat that weathers well, that has good sails and a good engine for those days the wind won't cooperate. And yes, if I get caught out past the third wind line and the wind decides to BLOW, a boat that will get me in and keep those I love safe. Safe as possible anyway. Smooth sailing
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Last edited by railsunderinca; 11-25-2006 at 04:36 PM.
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  #18  
Old 11-23-2006
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Hi there- not trying to hijack this thread, but was interested in peoples responses. I currently have a San Juan 23 (which I love) that is a great lake boat that meets my needs well.

I may move to Hawaii next year and want a boat there if I move. Am I crazy for wanting to take the San Juan with me? I don't plan on doing too much interisland long distance cruising (at least not at first), just coastal cruising not too far away, and exploring different bays. I like the relative shoal draft of the design of the SJ-23, and it seems to be fairly well-built, I also don't plan on going out in winter storms or heavy weather on purpose.

Others I guess I would consider would be an Albin Vega 27, Catalina 27, Cal 25, possibly a Columbia 26. I've raced on J-24's in the past, and always thought that they needed alot of rail meat to stay balanced (not possible when sailing with wife and two kids). I would want a boat that was still (barely) trailerable to at least get to the marina, sturdy and within a budget.

So I am also very interested in everyone's response to this thread. Thanks!

Last edited by rbensyl; 11-23-2006 at 11:28 PM.
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  #19  
Old 11-24-2006
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Take a look at the Helms boats. 24, 25, 27, 30 & 32. There are not a lot around, but were very well made, over built and sail well. The 25 can be trailered, double lower shouds, etc..
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  #20  
Old 11-24-2006
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Squals come fast on even the most beautiful day. They may be short but can catch even the best of 'em off guard. The traugh can be deep and short and beat you to death, making even the simplest tack difficult when the wind comes up. Keep in mind you're out past the reef and in deep water.
Safe sailing.
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