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  #101  
Old 12-06-2006
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And what context was that?
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  #102  
Old 12-06-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pigslo
And what context was that?
"One of the interesting things about pronunciation is how it's effected by geographical location. Now I know this board is largely overun by septics but the US is a good case in point."

That one.
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  #103  
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Lest we go by the boards here on issues of semetism, a jew's harp is part of the ground tay-cul, and what part might that be?
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  #104  
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Pronunciation of ship-board terms probably derives from their various countries of origin and so it would not be uncommon for an English sailor speaking in english to insert a Dutch or French word in the middle of the sentence and think nothing of it. The important point is that words have meaning and to corrupt meaning by usage is a crime. If you refer to the deck as a floor you may get by in terms of intent, but what do you then call the vertical support member running from the keel to the turn of the bilge?
If I were on a British man of war I would refer to a junior officer as a "lef-tenant" and continue to refer to the same rank officer on a US vessel as "loo-tenant". Different ships different long-splices.
Given the latest reports from the public schools I doubt that we can blame much on the lack of education of our sea-going forefathers.
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  #105  
Old 12-06-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailaway21
Lest we go by the boards here on issues of semetism, a jew's harp is part of the ground tay-cul, and what part might that be?
Jews harp: The ring bolted to the upper end of the shank of an anchor and to which the bending shackle secures. (Courtesy of http://www.usmm.net/)

Well I'll be buggered. I never knew that. To busy rabbiting on about poitical correctness. Ah well, such is life.
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  #106  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ebs001
tdw "it is hard to figure out how lieutenant managed to become leftenant". It's actually the other way around in English - "leftenent" became "lootenant" . The US changed that but why did they not change to "colonel" from "curnel". Although if you go back to it's roots, which were French, it should be pronounced "loo"
Its an interesting one this word lieutenant. Most people do seem to think that loo is the English and lef is the American whereas as you correctly point out it's the reverse. Did I get it the wrong way round ? Dumbarse Wombat !
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  #107  
Old 12-07-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Giulietta
Well, That is not the answer either...

try again
Jaysus Guilietta I am flumoxed. I obviously have something of a simpletons attitude as this trivia stuff I find irresistable but I'm damned if I can find the answer to this coffee conundrum.

I'm wondering ...

Is it a trick question ?

or

Does it have anything to do with the direction the port bottle moves or the need to have a free hand for the toast glass ? In which case the answer would seem to be to the left so that your right hand is free to pick up the toast glass.

Pure guesswork on my part and I guess I'll keep trying to find out the real answer.
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  #108  
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Actually tdw it is the anchor shackle in that same spot. BTW, an anchor shackle is straight sided and stronger than a bow shackle. It stows in the hawse pipe much better also. While on the subject of shackles, it is a mystery to me why none of the yachting catalogs offer a true safety shackle. A safety shackle has a threaded pin that threads not into the shackle itself, but a nut on the outside of the shackle. The pin has a hole through which a cotter pin is run through. The shackle develops full strength as the pin is full diameter going through the shackle body. A Jew's Harp is such a shackle and it amazes me that all the shackles, "safety" or otherwise require mousing. Is there a reason for this?
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  #109  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailaway21
Pronunciation of ship-board terms probably derives from their various countries of origin and so it would not be uncommon for an English sailor speaking in english to insert a Dutch or French word in the middle of the sentence and think nothing of it. The important point is that words have meaning and to corrupt meaning by usage is a crime. If you refer to the deck as a floor you may get by in terms of intent, but what do you then call the vertical support member running from the keel to the turn of the bilge?
If I were on a British man of war I would refer to a junior officer as a "lef-tenant" and continue to refer to the same rank officer on a US vessel as "loo-tenant". Different ships different long-splices.
Given the latest reports from the public schools I doubt that we can blame much on the lack of education of our sea-going forefathers.
The etymology of lieutenant is quite interesting as the word literally means a substitute or stand in. Lieu meaning place and tenant coming from the French tenir meaning holder. So the idear is that a lieutenant is someone who stands in for another of higher authority. http://www.etymonline.com is my source for this meaning.

In regard to usage the harsh reality is that it is usage that very often does change the meaning and pronunciation of a word and it has always been thus. Language , particularly the English language evolves and the the active agent in that evolution is usage, nowt else.
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  #110  
Old 12-07-2006
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Giulietta is holding this one pretty close to his vest. I'm still holding out that it has something to do with Nelson. Doesn't everything in the RN have something to do with Nelson?
To the right would make sense as we know what the left hand is used for in most cultures, but I suspect our Portugese friend has something more interesting in mind.
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