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post #11 of 22 Old 12-03-2006
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Congrats Gforce,
Would you please tell us a little about your current skills?
Do you know the difference between a jib and a halyard?
I was away from boats for a while (ok 20+ yrs) and took a course when I got back into it. Review of terminology, laws, Coast Guard requirements, navigation, etc.., were very helpful for me.
I also have to agree with SD that for boat handling nothing takes the place of experience, preferably with a experienced sailor along in the beginning. There is a big difference between passing the "rules of the road" section of the online course, and doing the right thing when there's a trawler bearing down on you.
The books mentioned by others are good. A more basic book if you need it would be Sailing Fundamentals by Gary Jobson, used by ASA and CG Aux.
Good Sailing!
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post #12 of 22 Old 12-03-2006
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Gforce, I think there's a free online boating safety course at boatsafe.com but that's general safety knowledge--not a sailing course. Sailing involves a lot of visceral feedback, it is best learned ON a boat, and learned better and faster if you don't have to "unlearn" things that were done the wrong way.

So I'd say the PowerSquadron courses, USCGA courses, all those skills are nice but you'll get a lot more enjoyment a lot faster by taking a basic sailing course, at a sailing school, to get you started. Often they break things up into a "basic" "intermediate" and then different directions to pursue, i.e. racing or bareboat cruising, navigation, etc. I'd say to take the first two right off, so you'll have a good grip on things from the start.
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post #13 of 22 Old 12-03-2006
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Sailing instruction.

IMHO Read, Read, Read, Then get out there and try to do it. Try small trips so you can think about the good and not so good aspects of each trip. Time and Experience are the best teachers. Just remember never to approach the dock at a speed faster than you are willing to hit it. Have Fun and congradulation on your new boat. P.S. I would recomend getting the Book Chapmans.http://www.amazon.com/Chapman-Piloti...e=UTF8&s=books

Fair Winds,

Bill

Last edited by Bill Mc; 12-03-2006 at 07:55 PM.
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post #14 of 22 Old 12-03-2006
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I actually wouldn't recommend Chapman's or The Annapolis Handbook as a primary source to read. They're both much better as reference books, rather than books to just sit and read.

David Seidman's The Complete Sailor is probably the best of the books I've recommended to my crew and other friends who want to learn to sail... fairly comprehensive, yet small, well-written and with good illustrations—much more readable than the other two.

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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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post #15 of 22 Old 12-03-2006
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Thanx Saildog

Thanks for the tip. Your right about it being a reference book, I read tech manuals all the time so I relate pretty well to chapmans. Next I'll try the ones you mentioned, If I'm not Sailing, then reading, watching or simply talking about it is my next favorite past time.

Edit; I'll add a web site that you might find informative. http://sailtoday.net/index.pacq

Fair Winds,

Bill

Last edited by Bill Mc; 12-03-2006 at 10:18 PM.
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post #16 of 22 Old 04-18-2007
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That is spam. I have seen the same thing on at least 3 threads all this month presumably from the join date.
As it is now a while since the original poster acquired his boat perhaps he could enlighten others who have much the same question with his experience.
How hard can it be? Ever taught someone to drive a car?
I think there are various areas.
1 the road rules etc which you could learn online but a course provides additional incedental learning.
2. Sailing fundamentals. Some theory ie books help or make it faster but practice is required preferably in a small boat.
3. Advanced sailing skills. Reefing docking etc. Theory maybe and practical.
4. Boat skills eg filter changing etc. Theory and pratice.
5 Judgement. Weather, routing, crew, good seamanship.
Like most things the skills for 90% can be learned by many people relatively quickly, as a lawyer told me as a teenager I could teach you 95% of what I do in a year.
Only thing is that last 5% or 1% or .01% is what makes a good lawyer, or one worth paying (hmm).
In the end I think it comes down to not what is the bare minimum I need do to sail a lot of the time. Rather an attitude - to move beyond basic semi-competence to the ability to handle whatever comes up. It requires experience and attitude to move from I am a lawyer so I know, to I don't know but will endeavour to find out prepare myself and act in the meantime in a seamanlike way ie conservatively to preserve my options.
Never mind lawyers. As captain you are responsible for the boat and yourself, skip those - how much value you put on them is up to you, but you are also responsible for the safety of others.
Summary sailing aint so difficult. Good sailing can take a while.
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post #17 of 22 Old 04-18-2007
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I wish I had your boat. It's beutiful to sail and stable. I suggest you get into a small sloop rigged daysailor and get the feal of it, the response of it will emedaditely let you know if you did the right thing or not with minimal concequances and it will also nurture your instinct and build confidence in your piloting skills.
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post #18 of 22 Old 04-18-2007
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Sailing is not rocket science. I would recommend if you cant find a sailing buddy, contact the local sailing school and have one of their instructors come out on your boat, you will learn more about your boat and the systems in place and possibly some improvements. I would gather that as you are getting this boat you must have some knowledge of sailing. If you have never put a reef in a main, with an instructor on board it should be a synch. Learn about what you have not what others have.

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post #19 of 22 Old 04-18-2007
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A professional sailing instructor is a no brainer for someone wanting know how now.

Last edited by JagsBch; 04-18-2007 at 09:41 AM.
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post #20 of 22 Old 04-18-2007
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I realize that we are all posting on a 4 month old post, but now is the time of year a lot of newbies are getting into their first boats. I agree that you can learn a lot in books, but if that 10,000 pounds is my dockmate I want them to have some hands on instruction. See the pissed off thread to see what yard bills are like for damage to other boats, and he was not a newbie.
Of course, a friend that is also a sailor and knows how to explain things is a great option. If they are not good instructors learn first and then learn from them later. ASA 101/102 is a small investment and does teach you basic skills and lets you practice them on a similar boat.Many of the ASA classes are taught on Catalina 30's in fact. Another option is to hire a captain (ASA instructor or other) for a day on your boat. Costs a few hundred dollars and you get enough knowledge to lessen the carnage to yourselves and others.

If in fact you feel that you already know everything I only hope that you are far enough away to be of no danger to me, and close enough for everyone watching to get a great laugh. And as long as you are far enough away we will laugh before we offer to help you. Remember, this is like a car and a gun......it usually hits what you are pointing at.
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