Favorite meals while sailing... - Page 15 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree54Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #141  
Old 07-30-2012
SVAuspicious's Avatar
Mermaid Hunter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: on the boat - Chesapeake
Posts: 3,649
Thanks: 0
Thanked 130 Times in 115 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SVAuspicious will become famous soon enough
Re: Favorite meals while sailing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
We are not talking fine dining here, we are talking about getting a hot meal into you quickly and simply.
Sailing doesn't have to be camping. You can eat well underway.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
This thread began life as 'favourite meals while sailing' not favourite haute cuisine, not even favourite meals at anchor.
Here's one of my favorites on delivery. When moving a boat you never really know what sort of cooking tools you have to work with.

On most boats you can count on a cooker on gimbals. With respect to pasta I've never had a problem even in big seas as long as there is a pot I can use that allows a couple of inches above the water level in the pot. If the crew is small enough you can make pasta in a percolator.

My fav offshore recipe:

Lay out a pork loin in a disposable foil pan. A bit of olive oil, ground pepper, and kosher salt (go easy). Chop onions, carrots, and celery and wrap in foil - drop in foil pan. Chop new potatoes (or any small red or other low starch potato, drizzle with olive oil, and wrap in foil - drop in foil pan. Cover the pan with more aluminum foil and shove in the oven set at 350F (ish).

You do have one of these
Amazon.com: Taylor Classic Instant-Read Pocket Thermometer: Kitchen & Dining Amazon.com: Taylor Classic Instant-Read Pocket Thermometer: Kitchen & Dining


right?

Depending on the oven somewhere between 45 minutes and 1-1/2 hours (most boat cookers aren't very well insulated and the temperature swings around) you'll get an internal temperature of 145F. Lock the gimbal on the cooker so you don't end up with everything in your lap, time the boat motion, and pull the pan out of the oven. Stick it on top of the cooker and unlock the gimbal. Let the pork sit covered for a few minutes while you assemble salads and pass them up to the crew. Slice half the roast and load up plates with the pork and roasted veg.

After dinner, slice the rest of the roast thinly for sandwiches next day.

If there is still some left you can stew them in jarred BBQ sauce, tomato paste, a little vinegar, pepper, oregano, and left over veg for an easy sort of barbecue pork.
copacabana and brokesailor like this.
__________________
sail fast and eat well, dave
S/V Auspicious
AuspiciousWorks.com
beware "cut and paste" sailors.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #142  
Old 07-30-2012
smurphny's Avatar
Over Hill Sailing Club
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Adirondacks NY
Posts: 2,910
Thanks: 66
Thanked 66 Times in 64 Posts
Rep Power: 6
smurphny is on a distinguished road
Re: Favorite meals while sailing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor View Post
In the US the big brand name for tinned pasta is Chef Boyardi. After a certain young age, it is better known as Purina Bachelor Chow.
Some stuff is inedible even for us bachelors. Canned pasta is one of them. Canned Chili...now that's another story. Some of it is actually good. I keep plenty of that on board along with lots of cans of Tuna and chopped clams. It's quick and easy to make up pretty good clam sauce with chopped clams, olive oil, onions, and garlic. There have to be 100 ways to use tuna. Canned goods are great on board as long as you can keep them dry. Once they start to rust, it does not take long for them to spoil.

If you know of a good energy bar recipe, please post a link. The last two I tried were terrible so I kinda gave up on it. Used to order Clif Bars by the case when I was road biking but have never been able to come close to a DIY recipe.
SVAuspicious likes this.
__________________
Alberg 35: With a philosophical flourish Cato throws himself upon his sword; I quietly take to the ship.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #143  
Old 07-30-2012
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,929
Thanks: 5
Thanked 80 Times in 74 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
Re: Favorite meals while sailing...

I'm beginning to think you guys sail in much calmer seas than we do. Passing salad plates up to the crew ? wow.

Dave, I thoroughly agree that sailing does not have to be camping but there is still an element of camping involved particularly when you are thrashing to windward in plus twenty knots with a nasty beam sea.

Must say I did like the sound of the roast pork thing though and yes I find the oven a great boon for cooking at sea.

As for pasta, maybe I am just being a worry wart but I've been badly scalded once in my life and I never want to go through that again, indeed a couple of years back when at anchor the Wombet clipped a saucepan of water and it went over her hand. OK, so we had the means to treat it available but it was not a pleasant experience and I'll do just about anything, yes even eat re heated pasta, to minimise the boiling of water on board.

btw ... it might have sounded as if I was summarily dismissing WingNwings idea of cooking pasta in a pressure cooker. I wasn't, though I'm not sure how you monitor the progress of the pasta. We still don't have a pressure cooker, its a situation we need to remedy.

Of course rice based dishes are a damn fine idea at sea as well.
__________________
Andrew B

"Do you think God gets stoned? I think so... Look at the platypus." Robin Williams.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #144  
Old 07-31-2012
SVAuspicious's Avatar
Mermaid Hunter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: on the boat - Chesapeake
Posts: 3,649
Thanks: 0
Thanked 130 Times in 115 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SVAuspicious will become famous soon enough
Re: Favorite meals while sailing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
I'm beginning to think you guys sail in much calmer seas than we do. Passing salad plates up to the crew ? wow.
Hi Andrew. I can't speak to the relative size and period of seas. What I described works for me as long as the cooker doesn't gimbal to the stops very often.

The pork loin and roast veg go on plates. The salad goes in bowls. *grin* One bowl at a time up the companionway. By the time the last one is up the first person is done and I can swap the salad bowl for a dinner plate. Downside - I end up eating salad for dessert so I can eat the main with crew. Not so bad. Weather permitting I feed crew in the cockpit since clean-up is easier and motion sickness is less of a factor; it's important to keep the crew fed.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
As for pasta, maybe I am just being a worry wart but I've been badly scalded once in my life and I never want to go through that again, indeed a couple of years back when at anchor the Wombet clipped a saucepan of water and it went over her hand.
Agree completely. I never EVER clip in to the galley. I don't want to be restrained if something bad starts to happen. U and J shaped galleys generally let you wedge yourself in so you have both hands free to cook. In really bumpy conditions I may wear my foulie bibs.

Mise en place is a big help. I do prep before starting to cook. If there isn't non-skid available, a damp paper towel under the cutting board and under some aluminum foil keeps the board from moving while you cut and chop and keeps the finished parts in place. Even better, offshore all the pieces (paper towels, foil, the foil pan for the pork loin,

I would not boil pasta if the cooker is swinging to the stops at all except in the percolator and even then only if the pot holders are beefy enough. In the pressure cooker you don't monitor the progress. You cook to time and get what you get.

I'll dig out my recipe for Meadle a la Auspicious that is a one pot PC meal that cooks the pasta along with everything else in the PC. There is a picture somewhere as well.
__________________
sail fast and eat well, dave
S/V Auspicious
AuspiciousWorks.com
beware "cut and paste" sailors.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #145  
Old 07-31-2012
BubbleheadMd's Avatar
Chastened
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Edgewater/Annapolis
Posts: 3,034
Thanks: 1
Thanked 60 Times in 56 Posts
Rep Power: 6
BubbleheadMd will become famous soon enough
Send a message via Yahoo to BubbleheadMd
Re: Favorite meals while sailing...

None of the boats I sail on have gimballed range tops. Most of what we eat underway is pre-prepared or only requires assembly, not cooking.

There is one partial exception, that is my absolute favorite. It's a riff on the southern U.S. biscuits and sausage gravy. Basically, it's a huge biscuit baked in a bundt cake pan, with sausage, a little white gravy and cream cheese baked into the middle of it. We warm it up in the oven, then slice it up and hand it out to the people on the rail.

The problem is, a female friend of the crew has the recipe and won't share it! She's hoarding it for a cooking contest. She'll prepare it for us, but won't tell us how to make it.
__________________
S/V Old Shoes
1973 Pearson 30 #255
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #146  
Old 07-31-2012
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 11
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
DocBrauer is on a distinguished road
Re: Favorite meals while sailing...

Has to really be bad before I can't eat out of at least a pot. Since I am a solo sailor after its cooked on stove top held in place by restraining bars makes a great place to eat. In all but rough seas a plate and mug works since my cutting board is cut to fit snug on top of stove and being gimballed makes handy table.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #147  
Old 07-31-2012
flyingwelshman's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,750
Thanks: 18
Thanked 25 Times in 18 Posts
Rep Power: 8
flyingwelshman will become famous soon enough
Re: Favorite meals while sailing...

Our favourite meal, or at least the one that is most memorable, was enjoyed in our first year of sailing.

We had a long sail to anchorage (6 + hours). I took a rack of wild boar ribs, rubbed them with a dry rub and set them on the BBQ on the lowest possible setting.

The ribs cooked away while we sailed to our anchorage.

Within five minutes of dropping the hook we were tearing into melt-in-your mouth ribs.

That was about 6 years ago and we still talk about it.
__________________
1989 Hunter 30'
Southern Georgian Bay

The sea, once it casts its spell, holds one in its net of wonder forever. - Jacques Yves Cousteau
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #148  
Old 07-31-2012
SVAuspicious's Avatar
Mermaid Hunter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: on the boat - Chesapeake
Posts: 3,649
Thanks: 0
Thanked 130 Times in 115 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SVAuspicious will become famous soon enough
Re: Favorite meals while sailing...

Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbleheadMd View Post
None of the boats I sail on have gimballed range tops. Most of what we eat underway is pre-prepared or only requires assembly, not cooking.
Really? I've cooked on only one boat in the last few years without gimballed range/oven. I'll have to pay more attention.

I have pictures somewhere of the pots tied down on the non-gimballed stove from Panama to Guatemala.
__________________
sail fast and eat well, dave
S/V Auspicious
AuspiciousWorks.com
beware "cut and paste" sailors.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #149  
Old 07-31-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Brazil
Posts: 970
Thanks: 3
Thanked 23 Times in 22 Posts
Rep Power: 8
copacabana is on a distinguished road
Re: Favorite meals while sailing...

Here is a one-pot meal that is easy and quick to prepare, especially if you use canned beans. I prefer to soak and pressure cook my beans because the flavour is just so much better, but I’m the first to admit that opening a can is less work. I’ve made this on board a few times and even used shrimp instead of pork (though the preparation is different- you flash-cook the spiced shrimp, set aside and only return to the pot at the end).

Pork and White Bean Chili

Ingredients:

Spice mix: (homemade chili powder)

2 tablespoons ground cumin
1 tablespoon oregano
1 tablespoon cayenne pepper
1 tablespoon paprika
1 teaspoon white pepper

1kg (2 lbs) pork loin or shoulder, trimmed of fat and cut in bite-sized pieces
500g (1lb) of white navy beans (soaked overnight and cooked) or 2 cans cooked white navy beans, drained.
1 can peeled Italian tomatoes
1 can of beer
1 small green, red and yellow pepper, cut into small squares
1 large onion, diced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1 or 2 green Jalapeño peppers, minced (optional)
½ cup fresh coriander, chopped
Salt to taste
Oil


Preparation:

Pat dry the pork pieces, rub with the spice mix and set aside uncovered. In a deep skillet, quickly sauté the onions and peppers in oil and remove while still crunchy. Set aside. In the same skillet, brown the pork pieces, Jalapeño peppers and garlic on high heat in oil (perhaps in 2 batches to sear better). Add the canned tomatoes and with a spoon and knife, break the tomatoes into smaller chunks (or use “chopped” canned tomatoes). Add the rest of the spice mix, salt and about half a can of beer, cover and simmer on very low heat for 20 minutes. Add the drained beans, half the fresh coriander and sautéed onion and peppers and cook for another 3 minutes. Garnish with the remaining coriander and serve.
tdw likes this.
__________________
Vindö 50
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #150  
Old 07-31-2012
SVAuspicious's Avatar
Mermaid Hunter
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: on the boat - Chesapeake
Posts: 3,649
Thanks: 0
Thanked 130 Times in 115 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SVAuspicious will become famous soon enough
Re: Favorite meals while sailing...


Left to right: Carlos, me, George; photo credit to Anja
Photo somewhere West of Plymouth England enroute to Azores

Meadle a la Auspicious

Meadle is the name my Mom gave a stove-top casserole we often had when i was a child to help stretch meat. The proportions of pasta to meat are pretty forgiving and subject to adjustment based on how much of the other ingredients you have and how many people you are trying to feed. I adapted it for my pressure cooker. This recipe feeds me for two or three meals, sometimes four, depending on how hungry i am and what else i make.

1 cup uncooked pasta (any small pasta shape works well; I use elbow macaroni)
½ lb ground beef (i prefer lean)
2 cloves of garlic, minced or 1 tsp prepared crushed garlic
1 medium onion
3 or 4 small to medium tomatoes
or
½ to ¾ of a 15 oz can of stewed, crushed, or chopped tomatoes
1 small to medium bell pepper
1 tsp oregano
salt & pepper

I usually make meadle with elbow macaroni. rustle through your vegetables and pitch in whatever is about to go bad. hot peppers, carrots, celery, and cauliflower work well. mushrooms tend to disintegrate, but leftover cooked mushrooms or canned mushrooms added after cooking work well.

In a 4-quart or larger pressure cooker, brown ground beef over medium heat until it crumbles. Pour off the drippings. Stir in the rest of the ingredients. Add the pasta and just enough water (or stock) to barely cover the pasta. Lock the lid in place. Bring to 15psi over high heat, immediately reduce the heat to the lowest possible setting to stabilize and maintain that pressure. Cook 6-8 minutes. Remove from heat and use the natural release method (if you are patient ) before opening the lid. Transfer to a serving dish. You can sprinkle your choice of cheese over top (feta is great, parmesan is as well).

This dish keeps pretty well, and if sealed in bags with a vacuum sealer can be reheated in the bag in boiling water (even boiling sea water) so you won’t make another pot dirty.
DRFerron, tdw, brokesailor and 1 others like this.
__________________
sail fast and eat well, dave
S/V Auspicious
AuspiciousWorks.com
beware "cut and paste" sailors.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Off-Season Sailing Seminars Dobbs Davis Learning to Sail Articles 0 12-05-2001 08:00 PM
How Other Sailors Learned Mark Matthews Learning to Sail Articles 0 08-31-2001 09:00 PM
Great Books for Beginners Mark Matthews Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 01-27-2000 08:00 PM
Are the Kids on a Sabbatical? Micca Hutchins Learning to Sail Articles 0 04-04-1999 09:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:05 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.