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  #11  
Old 12-17-2006
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1.)CO2 is toxic, that is what kills you when you are trapped in a closed space.You are poisened before you run out of oxygen.2.) All cooling is done by absorbing heat and therefore the colder it is the more heat it will aborb.3.) You are breathing the stuff out in concentrations that are probably higher than what is melting.
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  #12  
Old 12-17-2006
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Not to beat a dead horse. I work with CO2 in both liquid and gaseous states along with other chemicals / gases and we maintain / monitor these with Triple redundency. If one of our montors fail we have two more left in place. We calibrate these instruments with regularity and documentation that reflects who,what,when,as found and as left. Way to complicated to impliment while Sailing. Sailing is where I go to escape these procedures and enjoy simplicity.

Fair Winds,

Bill
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  #13  
Old 12-17-2006
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One of the best improvments that I did on my previous trailer sailor was to install a 12/110 volt cold plate in the frig on board. It did not use that much electric, I kept it full, and the 5 years of ownership covered it's cost in ice buying/hauling and frustration. I am sure that it also helped to sell the boat. Aint nuttin like a cold soda pop!
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  #14  
Old 12-17-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pigslo
1.)CO2 is toxic, that is what kills you when you are trapped in a closed space.You are poisened before you run out of oxygen.2.) All cooling is done by absorbing heat and therefore the colder it is the more heat it will aborb.3.) You are breathing the stuff out in concentrations that are probably higher than what is melting.
pigslo
Wrong! It is NOT toxic. Again, it is more dense that O2 and will dispalce it.
Ice AND dry ice? OK, if you open the fridge at home, the cooler will work better too. If your going to have the problems of dry then why pack wet in there too? Dry wouold be great in a closed, not to be opened for many days cooler for a real long trip. For a long weekend, Why? It's like wiping before you poop, it just don't make sense (Larry the Cable guy)
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Old 12-17-2006
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Wildcard, I do not post anything I have no checked. CO2 is what kills you when you are in a con fined space. You die of CO2 poisoning BEFORE you run out of oxygen. CO is way more poisoness as your red blood cells will take one of those molecules 360 times faster than an oxygen molecule. While CO2 is not as poisoness (obviously you breathe it out), it is poisoness. I have a PIG H D from the Swine University by the way.
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Thats CO not CO2. BIG diff. Nice try thou.
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For your edification. CO2 AKA Carbon Dioxide
http://scifun.chem.wisc.edu/chemweek/CO2/CO2.html
CO aka CarbonMonoxide
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbon_monoxide
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Old 12-17-2006
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Wild...I don't know if it is "toxic" in the strict sense of the word. To the extent that it displaces oxygen in an enclosed environment...it can still kill you from lack of oxygen.

It is commonly used to carbonate beverages and in the manufacturing of 'dry' ice and fire extinguishers. Why is it dangerous?

Because carbon dioxide displaces oxygen, it is a health risk since we need oxygen to live. CO2 is an asphyxiant. It can cause headaches, drowsiness and loss of ability to maintain concentration. Hence the government standards,,,,

How much is safe in the home?

The Federal Standard for carbon dioxide limits of exposure in air is 5,000 ppm (parts per million). This exposure limit is for a healthy adult. Consideration should be given for children, people over 65, and people with specific health conditions. A guideline set forth by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) for schools, offices, and areas where people spend extended periods of time indoors is 1000 ppm. As a comparison, it is not unusual that outdoor air has a concentration of carbon dioxide in the range of 300 to 400ppm. Metropolitan areas usually have higher outdoor air concentrations of carbon dioxide than rural areas.

http://www.dupagehealth.org/health_alert/co2_alert.html
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Old 12-17-2006
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so using wild's "toxic" word water is also toxic unless your a fish i must be in the wrong forum this one is for chemical engineers i wanted the practical sailor one.....
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Quote:
Originally Posted by catalyst27
so using wild's "toxic" word water is also toxic unless your a fish i must be in the wrong forum this one is for chemical engineers i wanted the practical sailor one.....
http://www.m-w.com/cgi-bin/dictionar...onary&va=toxic
No one has a gun to your head. Were debating the pros, cons and problems with using dry ice. Don't like it, don't read it.
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