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Old 12-19-2006
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A debate on tenders...

Beat to death Im sure. I asked this question in another thread but got no replies. I see wood, glass, plastic and inflatable tenders. I don't believe I have ever seen an aluminum tender? Other than they are ugly and hard to stow, but no more so than any ridgid skiff I would think, why not? Seems to me for rock/ coral landings they would be ideal.... Your thoughts? Im thinking a 12 foot Gregor type or a purpose built john boat type skiff.
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Old 12-19-2006
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one problem i see with aluminum, especially as opposed to inflatible is the possibility of filling with water and sinking. This type of boat is generally not positively buoyant, and in fact will sink when filled with water. They are designed for calm water, and will swamp if you get into any significant chop.

With careful navigation, you should be able to avoid rocks and reefs.
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Old 12-19-2006
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All skiffs have poss bouyancy built in flotation, all newer ones anyway but I would not want to tow one full of water. I have had several of them in some pretty crappy water and they did OK. Im in Hawaii where few sand beaches exsist and plan on doing both north and south pacific in the near ( I hope) future. I think I saw a comment about alum skiffs being popular in Aussieland?
Thanks for the input.
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Old 12-19-2006
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LOL! Wait? Hummm, that could be an issue. If an alum skiff is not attached with a conductive teather but just rest in nearby water, would that be an issue? Im thinking no?
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Old 12-19-2006
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When I was researching RIBs, I found an aluminum bottom RIB that was made in New Zealand. I think the brand name was Aquapro and it is called a Reef Tender series. There was a dealer on the west coast and I think I recall one in Canada. An internet search should find them.
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Many brands of those, VERY nice but very spendy for there size.
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Old 12-19-2006
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Aluminum dinghies are noisy, harder to repair, expensive, and relatively difficult to stow. Inflatables are relatively easy to repair, relatively easy to stow, and quieter. Wood or fiberglass dinghies are easy to repair, harder to stow, less expensive, and often have less load capacity than comparable inflatables.

A 12' dinghy is going to be a nightmare to stow. Towing it is not an option in heavy weather. What size boat is this for?? If it is for anything less than 40', I think you'll find that it is going to be a problem.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wildcard
LOL! Wait? Hummm, that could be an issue. If an alum skiff is not attached with a conductive teather but just rest in nearby water, would that be an issue? Im thinking no?
Unless your alum skiff has it's own, independant galvanic isolator, it will conduct stray electrical currents away from the noble metals of adjacent vessels - regardless of conductive tether attachment.

The aluminum inboard/outboard drives on several unprotected powerboats at our marina, have suffered the devastating effects of electrolosis and galvanic corrosion from adjacent docked boats. I suppose that I wouldn't complain if you were my dockmate.
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I've seen aluminum "inflatables" - by that I don't mean they are inflated, but are built to look like inflatables with rigid aluminum tubes. These would address the load carrying comparisons with RIBs, but you still have the difficulty of stowage and noise alongside. But they'd be rugged as hell!
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