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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
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  #51  
Old 01-12-2007
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Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor
Portuguese...aren't they some of those johnny-come-lately salckers who didn't get around to sailing the seven seas until, ahem, five hundred years after the Norse had sacked and pillaged the entire known world (and parts of the New World) as well?
Nahh, That's the Mexicans, and they came by land
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  #52  
Old 01-12-2007
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Yes, being short makes it much harder for the boom on my boat to find a way to hit me in the head... I'd have to be over a foot taller for that to happen while I'm in the cockpit... but I do have a boom brake installed just in case.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #53  
Old 01-12-2007
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Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice
SD, are you that small guy from the Jackass movie???

Only him is safe from the boom!!
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  #54  
Old 01-12-2007
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ALERT! ALERT! ALERT!

GIU IS NOW SWITCHING HIS CROSS-HAIRS TO SAILINGDOG.

ALERT! ALERT! ALERT!

(Whew, I am off the hook of now having to say something witty). Good thing T34 is coming off the little Portugese Island too.
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  #55  
Old 01-12-2007
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Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by hellosailor
"The most serious injuries, according the the SAS material was head traumas" The USYRU (now USSA) and even the ORC have been debating helmets for racers and sailors for decades now. Apparently a small number are killed by booms and a larger number seriously injured by concussions, even when not racing. I'd hate to wear a helmet when sailing all the time...but they make a valid point, skulls rarely win against booms. Kinda like recreational snow skiing, helmets were unknown 30 years ago but they're being used voluntarily by some folks now. Not much you can do in terms of first aid for a good conk on the noggin.
I agree with this, I would love for them to wear padded helmets, so they don't damage my carbon fiber boom, when they hit it with their head !!!
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Old 01-12-2007
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Warning about Quick Clot, don't use it if your not trained in it's use, it can do some serious damage. For the military it is now only used if a tourniquet fails! There is a reason you cant just go to GI Joes and buy some.
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  #57  
Old 01-12-2007
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I don't think that Giulietta worries about the boom hitting his head...since he has an extra thick skulll. Actually, he might worry about breaking the boom on it.

And no... but the boom is above the bimini...and the bimini has 6'+ of space under it... and I'm only 5' 5" or so.... Most of my crew is 6'+ though...
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #58  
Old 01-12-2007
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Sounds like the moral of this thread is ... don't get hurt & don't get sick!
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  #59  
Old 01-12-2007
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sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice sailaway21 is just really nice
Windmagic does make a good point. Don't ship out with pre-existing conditions that cannot be handled, or stabilized, afloat.

CD makes excellent points.

One of my duties on board ship was medical officer. We took a month long course that was basically advanced EMT. Never needed the serious stuff, although I sailed with a fellow who helped deliver six babies in three days! His ship was involved in the evac. of Viet Nam.

Unfortunately, in a serious accident, you are not going to have what you need. You will be more likely to need morphine than you will anti-biotics, you guess which one you can't get. Infection takes time-that's antibiotics. Serious trauma/serious pain is instantaneous-that's morphine.

Many things mentioned, like the jock itch cream, are very good. Some of the most common things I would think of include: all manner of treatment for every level of burns. Burns are probably the frequent injury-they happen in myriad ways and are always unexpected. Scalding water to the foot can disable the heartiest soul. In addition to numerous pre-packaged dressings, I would recommend getting a big jar of Silvadene cream. It is prescription, but your physician should be willing given your intended use. This stuff is the Poly-glo of burn treatment, everything from severe sunburn up to third-degree. It relieves the pain and greatly aids in healing. Get as big a tub as you can. Ask anyone who has ever been burned about the white cream they got from the Dr.

Touniquet material and air splints are essentials. We're not going to be Marcus Welby-all we are trying to do is stabilise the patients condition.

If you have a nursing friend, perhaps you can talk them into showing you how to start an IV. In my class, we practised on each other! It's really not hard to get the knack of it. If you have that skill, it is worthwhile to carry Ringer's lactate, and other IV administered fluids. In severe trauma/sickness simply getting a dextrose solution into the blood stream can be invaluable.

The most used things will be items that you commonly use ashore and take most for granted. If you are incapacitated in the head with severe diarrhea, you can't sail the vessel. Upset stomaches, migraines, tooth-ache-all are things quite easily dealt with ashore that can be debilitating at sea. Plan heavily on these. Just for diarrhea I'd take multiple products-sometimes one works better than another. In addition to good old aspirin, I recommend ibuprofen. In addition to being a pain reliever, it is an anti-inflammatory and muscle relaxant. Ingested in Motrin strength it works wonders on that geeked back, cracked rib, or pulled muscle.

If you take a medication regularly I would recommend that you save the pill bottles and split up the amount you are taking with you. If you have only the one bottle and it's contents inadvertently get soaked, dropped over-board, or in the bilge-you have options. The medical bag is not a bad place for a spare set of contacts or glasses also.

If you don't carry scalpels, through an exacto-knife in the kit with different size blades. They work wonders on splinters, boils, and such.

As has probably been mentioned, most of the kits I've seen start out with good ideas but fall short. A bunch of dinky band-aids are useless when you need a big one-and your kit gave you six! Dump the dinky ones, buy a big 'ol box of the big ones and cut 'em if you need to. Guaze is another one-can't have enough-especially "cling" that sticks to itself. The trouble with the kits is that you get an "initial" amount of what you need, with nothing for tomorrow. If you get burned, you're going to need to treat it for the duration-figure on a chest or back-sized burn and the amount of cream and guaze you'd need for the duration. Betcha it's alot more than you thought.

As wind magic says, don't get hurt or sick. It's much easier to avoid both than it is to treat either. Plan ahead and be safe in your practises.
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  #60  
Old 01-13-2007
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Question

Question to the group: Is there a good all-encompassing textbook for offshore sailors for handling medical situations on the water?
There is a reason for my question: I casually looked around for such a book, but only found a couple of smallish handbooks. Is there a semi-comprehensive one available? The reason I ask is that I am a physician who is board-certified in two medical specialties and who was a longtime faculty member at a medical school. My focus was medical education. I also spent five years during my varied career as an emergency physician. I have thought about the idea of writing a medicine text for sailors (lay people, not medical professionals). Of course, this would be a large task, and would take a great deal of effort. But I do have some experience, and am in print in a current medical textbook.
What do you think? Is there a need? Is it worth the (huge) effort? I don't want to repeat what has already been done if there's already a text available.
Q
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