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  #11  
Old 01-25-2007
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Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Thanks Vasco.

It's too bad too, because PS and Valaint are AWESOME boats. The wrong boat choice kills (figuratively) more sailors as cruising is no fun than anything else I would bet. Catalina is not my favorite boat, as many of you know. It is not the safest boat. But let me tell you something, for a guy that loves cruising with his two young boys, two dogs, and a wife he wants to keep aboard, it is AWESOME!!... and... I could NOT make ANY PS or Valiant work.

Now my Hylas 54 or Mason... well, that is another story (and a different checkbook)!!!

Thanks again Vasco.

- CD
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  #12  
Old 01-25-2007
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camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
CD...great post. Vans...welcome! The only things I would add to CD's post are the practical ones. You are in the northwest...that means going anywhere exotic requires a blue water boat...even down to Mexico. That upside down catamaran on your coast a month or so again shows how rough it can be out there. Alternatively, you can buy a smaller boat up there and learn to sail and enjoy the cruising grounds north of you in the Puget Sound and San Juans. That is where I would focus your initial efforts as most of us would kill to be able to cruise a bit up there! And with currents and wind and weather that are often less than benign, you will get some good practice before heading off shore. My own advice would be to get something in the 30ft. range to start...something blue water capable rather than the Hunter type boats. Since your wife will NOT be joining you, you will find a traditional 30 footer snug and comfortable and MORE easily handled (set up properly) by one than a lighter production boat...and you will have a sea kindly motion that will keep you comfortable on passage.

Once you've gotten some miles under that keel...you'll know exactly what you want in a bigger boat OR if you really WANT a bigger boat as a blue water 30' boat may just be all you need. If I was getting a blue water boat to single hand around the world and money were NOT an issue...I would get one of these:
http://www.robinhoodyachts.com/core/...oat_id=1585480

But there are lots of boats that will do the job.
A boat over 40 ft. is probably not a good idea for single handing...otherwise Hylas and Oyster are certainly excellent passage makers.
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  #13  
Old 01-25-2007
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I agree with most everything stated above. I have some of the same cruising aspirations (Bermuda, Bahamas, FL Keys, Mexico, etc.) but I don't have the experience yet. In order to remedy that, I bought a Catalina 22. I figure that I get some sailing experience in it, close quarters and all, and then move up. Anything will have more room down below than a C22. Plus, I'm having a blast while I learn. The whole point is to get out there and sail, right?

Canoeman256
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s/v Half Fast
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  #14  
Old 01-25-2007
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Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Always enjoy reading Cam's advice and typically agree. He is very experienced and you should listen to what he says.

I will add that Oregon is often not very kind in a storm. There are not a lot of places to duck. I HAVE sailed the Pacific, but NOT Oregon... so this is based on what I have been told. Watch you weather out there pretty closely. I don't care if you are on a V50, when it gets bad out there, it gets really bad. However, the larger Catalinas run all over those coasts with more trips up and down them than I could even begin to relay. Even the finest boats and most offshore capable boats can go down on that coast with poor judgement. I would put more emphasis on the Captain (yourself) than the boat. Get a big fat comfortbale boat the wife likes so you don't sail by yourself. All boats should be singled (in my often contested opinion).

- CD

Again, I personally put a lot of credibility on anything Cam says, but I would personally not be concerened about a Catalina in those waters if you are careful.

PS Look at a Catalina 36.
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Old 01-25-2007
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camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
CD...I would be concerned about he smaller Catalinas offshore there but the main thing is he is single handing and doesn't need the room a Catalina provides...so why not get a blue water vessel? My thought was that initially he should buy and store up in Washington and cruise out of there rather than attempt the Oregon River bars and coast before he is ready. The Oregon rivers are not much of a cruising ground but you can learn to sail on them...but then there's not much to do!
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  #16  
Old 01-25-2007
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Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
I definitely see your point, Cam.
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  #17  
Old 01-25-2007
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Camaraderie wrote:
"My thought was that initially he should buy and store up in Washington and cruise out of there rather than attempt the Oregon River bars and coast before he is ready."
Very good idea!
I would also add that you should not be so quick to dismiss your wifes participation. Get a boat with an interior she likes and you have won half the battle to winning her over. You may not enjoy sailing by yourself as much as you might enjoy it with your wife, if you can show her how to enjoy it. Just make sure it is a wife freindly boat, (focus on the interior). If you can find ways to get her to take ownership through interior design she will be a more willing crew.
You don't need a bluewater cruiser for the Puget Sound & San Juans, a production coastal cruiser with creature comforts is the way to go here, and it will take you many many sailing seasons to see it all.
If your wife is a powder puff be sure to stay at marinas and harbours that have shopping, restaurants and sight seeing to pique her interest more.
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  #18  
Old 01-25-2007
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My thoughts..

Hello,

I personally would buy a used boat that is in need of some upgrades or maintanance....I say this because when I bought mine I thought that there was nothing wrong with it and I sooned I was wrong. I have been in every part of my boat cleaning this, fixing that (not cheap), but invaluble experience.

I am confortable now fixing engine problems (replaced water pump, fuel injector, injectors..etc..), electrical problems (new battery, new LED lights inside), changing shrouds, chainplates etc...

I think this is an important part that must be learned prior to sailing in the great BLUE...

I say this without BLUE water experience...the farthest I have been is Miami to Key West and back...!

later...
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  #19  
Old 01-25-2007
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Thanks a lot for the great replies, especially yours CD and Cam.

This helps a lot in giving me an idea of what i am after. Pacific Seacraft was mentioned. I went through one at the boat show two weekends ago and spent some time talking to the sales rep. I was surprised that that boat would do a circumnavigation. It certainly was cramped and tiny inside compared to the Hunters and Beneteaus i had just went though. I know if i ever hope to coax her into this plan it will require some space in the boat.

I guess this begs the question, just what qualifies a boat as a coastal cruiser and where is the line that separates blue water cruising from coastal.

Would coastal cruising here in Oregon with its unruly weather be such a different ball game that is requires a different type boat than say the Virginia to Florida coastal runs i have been reading about? Even if one stayed close to the coast would a run up the coast to the San Juans or down the the coastline to southern CA or even to the Panama canal for a run into the Gulf of Mexico be too much for a Hunter or Beneteau type boat?

Ive seen some rough seas and the thought of many days on them in a boat that is of questionable capabilities sends chills down my spine. Even if it is only a couple miles off the beach.

I had ideas of spending some days traveling up and down the Columbia to get my feet wet with overnight trips. Granted, the way the Gorge works it will be a chore heading up river.

Thanks again for the discussion.
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  #20  
Old 01-25-2007
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camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Vans...While I've visited the Oregon coast but never sailed there, I've read enough as well I think to offer some opinions but others with actual experience can feel free to correct me.
The Oregon coast is perhaps the most hostile place for a sailboat in the entire country. There are no safe harbors to put into and the river bars are so treacherous when the weather kicks up that they are the stuff of legend. It is considered the roughest and most prestigious duty in the Coast Guard.
Like anyplace else...the weather can be fine and clam and you can take a day sailor out....but in my opinion it is no place for a recreational sailor in a production sailboat that does not have a LOT of experience and an excellent understanding of the weather windows and tides.
There are many other threads here which you can search on on the differences between a blue water boat and a production coastal cruiser but the hulls are sturdier and stiffer, the fittings and fixtures are designed to stand up to 24x7 pounding from the seas, and the boat moves THROUGH the heavy seas rather than slapping and dropping and shaking every bone in your body. I like the Hummer vs. a Caddy analogy since it does not disparage either design but indicates a purpose driven design.
Again...if your wife is not involved, I advise getting a sea boat and sailing out of the Puget sound until you are ready for the "desolate" coast which is far different than anything we have here in the East!
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