Noob wonderings and questions about sailing, life at sail and sailboats - Page 4 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest > General Discussion (sailing related)
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #31  
Old 01-26-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Vans-

From my original post...

Quote:
There are many affordable boats that will allow you to go bluewater sailing like, the Alberg 30, the Southern Cross 31, the Allied Seawind 32, and others, at a far more reasonable cost than the brands you've mentioned.

A good book to read is John Vigor's 20 Small sailboats to Take you Anywhere.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #32  
Old 01-26-2007
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
OK..new blue water boats in 35 foot range price no object:
Robinhood 36 (same as Cape dory 36 but new!)

Morris 34

Cabo Rico 36

Hans Christian 34




Shannon 39

Any one of these is capable of blue water cruising in style and comfort and doing serious damage to your wallet!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #33  
Old 01-27-2007
Here .. Pull this
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 2,031
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Sailormann will become famous soon enough
If you don't have a lot of sailing experience, I think that the best thing you can do is find a used 14 to 18 foot daysailer and learn to race it. Get one that has a cunningham and a spinnaker and an adjustable backstay and a tiller so that you can really understand what happens when you make an adjustment to your rig. With a small, light boat underneath you, the result of any change is readily apparent, you literally learn to sail by the seat of your pants as you feel your boat lift under you and take flight like a live thing. And there are few things more satisfying than developing the confidence that comes from knowing what to do when the wind changes or the boat broaches unexpectedly. Learning on a larger boat is more difficult. You can't feel the water as easily through a wheel as you can through a tiller, and the boats are so heavy that they don't react to changes very fast. If you screw up in a Flying Junior - you're in the water, if you screw up on a Hinckley 40, you might spill someone's drink. If you start this way, you'll develop the skills that you need to safely sail a small boat through just about anything, and it won't seem so far-fetched that someone should head off to Polynesia in a Flicka (20 foot sloop). As far as the frequent derogatory remarks made about Hunters, Catalinas, Irwins, etc. go .... the fact is that the boats are not built as strongly as a lot of other brands. To be fair, they don't have to be, as most of them are never farther than a half-mile from the dock. The unfortunate thing is that most of the dealers who are selling these boats are not as honest about the structural integrity of the boats as they could be...not a big issue when you are selling a boat to a sail'r who's been around the jetty a few times, but not particularly ethical when you're selling a retirement vessel to a couple with bluewater aspirations. A special note about MacGregors however - these are not boats, they are toys. They have set a new low in quality standards and I am amazed that their firm has not been sued out of existence. Anyway - to repeat myself - doesn't really matter what you end up on - just get a boat and get on with it. If it's the wrong one you'll realise soon enough, and if it's the right one - well you'll probably trade it in anyway ...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #34  
Old 01-27-2007
SimonV's Avatar
Wish I never found SN!
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Brisbane Australia
Posts: 1,996
Thanks: 3
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SimonV will become famous soon enough
Van
Just read the tread.

Three weeks on the ocean in a small yacht is not that hard I did it in 2000, sailed a Roberts 45 from Freemantle to Sydney. Big seas in the Great Southern Ocean they really seem big when they first arrive, then you sort of get into a rythem after a few more days their not that bad at all, you can trim the boat or set the course off a few points and get some comfort back, dont try cooking a roast, stick with staples. I tried a sponge cake 4" thick one side 1" the other. Thats another story.

With your lack of sailing try chartering with a skipper you'll be amased how much you will learn.

I've got thousands of sea miles under the belt and I must admit I get sea sick at the start of every long voyege normaly kicks in after 24Hrs can't eat much but you have to keep on going. get some sleep and one time you wake up feeling seedy but thats it no more calling for ralf.

one thing with being sea sick is when you think you cant hurl any more, you can.!!

You have some great boats in the US at good prices. Ive been doing some reserch as I am without boat at the moment, and considering many of yours at the moment one of the best buys might be an Endeavour 37 fits the bill for an ocean crossing, plenty of fuel and water tankedge and when in Australia perfect for day and coastal work should be an easy short or single hander.

Was looking towards the C 38, would do the crossing but short on tankadge and internal access to the important bits is poor most seemed heavely raced.

If you are positive you want to sail, 34 to 38 seem to give the best of both worlds with space, storage and cost.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #35  
Old 01-27-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Cam-

You must be slipping.. You forgot the Hallberg Rassy 342.



I would have posted the Nauticat 351, but it has a doghouse...
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #36  
Old 01-27-2007
SimonV's Avatar
Wish I never found SN!
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Brisbane Australia
Posts: 1,996
Thanks: 3
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SimonV will become famous soon enough
Saildog

Whats your thoughts on the Endeavour 37 as an all round yacht
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #37  
Old 01-27-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
SimonV-

Not too familiar with the Endeavor 37. Haven't sailed one, haven't been on one... so I can't really say much. You might want to start a new thread instead of hijacking this one, since it will get you far better responses. JeffH probably can say a bit more about them...
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #38  
Old 01-27-2007
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Oregon
Posts: 4
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Vans is on a distinguished road
Sailorman mentioned the MacGregors. I have to admit that i considered one of these as an entry level boat. Inexpensive, easy to trailer, seems easy to operate. Do others share sailorman's opinion on these?\

Thanks everyone on boat opinions, suggestions and information.

Can someone calm my fears about getting caught in a storm? Considering i have the most minimal of experience on a sailboat and zero in bad weather conditions, i have some , most likely wrong, preconceived ideas about it. I cant imagine that one keeps all the sails up as they would get torn to shreds and it seems it would make sailing a bit more dangerous.

I know while in bad seas in a power boat the engine is vital to keep one in proper position on the swells, especially while crossing the bar. Is the, what seems a smallish to me, engine on a sail boat used in such conditions?

I just finsihed reading the online book of the gentleman, from Oregon as it happens, who bought a small sailboat and sailed around the world for two years. http://vps.arachnoid.com/sailbook/index.html

He seemed to gloss over his experience in bad seas.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #39  
Old 01-27-2007
CapnHand's Avatar
humble pie rat
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Location, Location
Posts: 867
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
CapnHand is on a distinguished road
The boats not metioned yet that may be perfect for you right now are SE's and OP's (someone else's, other people's). Go to your local yacht club and sign up as crew. You will see a number of boats that you can decide are either right for you (or not) for sailing in that area. It'll give you some training others that know the local waters. You'll probably even get some rough weather experience. Who know's, it might even be a good way to get your wife hooked.
__________________
There are 10 kinds of people. Those who understand binary and those who don't.

Last edited by CapnHand; 01-27-2007 at 01:02 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #40  
Old 01-27-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 825
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
chris_gee is on a distinguished road
Re Fear of storms. You were probably afraid when as a child you first learned to ride a bike. When you could you got confidence. That is why some of us emphasise learning to sail, and building some experience before worrying too much about the boat buying.

Second some fear or anxiety is normal - most will have some before a passage or even a race. That disappears. I find that any new boat takes a bit of getting used to. Confidence grows after several trips.

Another factor is faith in the boat. When you see big waves mounting up behind you, then the stern lifts and you see the boat handles it, after a while you just accept it. The boat is ok you are ok. You learn to trust the boat. In the worst case you can take everything down go below and wait a day or two.

There are storm handling technicques you can learn - in time.

My teacher said make your first long passage with someone experienced at it. "What this? Oh it's nothing." His competence and confidence is reassuring. Far better than people panicking and screaming at the wife because everyone is stressed out. "Pull what rope?" "That .. one" "No not that one, that ... one" "Pull your own .. rope"

One of my favourites was two elderly like late 70s long term women cruisers, who were asked how they handled storms. "We don't do storms" was the brilliant response.

That is a very good answer. You can watch the weather and plan and time your passages. Cruising - if you wait a day or a week so what?

We are not talking big teams of professional highly experienced sailors racing in the Southern Ocean, but ordinary people planning and equipped for safe comfortable passages in relatively benign waters.

When you have built the knowledge experience and skill, have the right boat and planning then your anxiety will dissipate because you know you are well founded. Your concern at the moment is reasonable, and normal.
In time your wife may come around when she sees the pleasures and has confidence.

To put it in perspective the biggest problem for most will not be storms but light airs and needing the skills to keep the boat going in them. Your area may however be more demanding.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:47 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.