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  #11  
Old 01-29-2007
camaraderie's Avatar
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Jeff...as always...good stuff. Have you done anything up on rudders?
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  #12  
Old 01-31-2007
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Thanks for all that Jeff It was really helpful.

PS. Someone told me that in picture 8 on that 32' discovery you can notice some bulkhead repair work. I am asking the dealer about the hull and the low price.
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  #13  
Old 01-31-2007
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Thanks for all that Jeff It was really helpful.

PS. Someone told me that in picture 8 on that 32' discovery you can notice some bulkhead repair work. I am asking the dealer about the hull and the low price.


Surprisingly, there are very little good cruisers available for sale in BC right now. At least in my price range. I've looked at the boats on that list and most of them venture into the 50K area. I might have to budget more for my boat or maybe just buy a coastal cruiser for now.

Are Catalina's blue water boats?
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  #14  
Old 01-31-2007
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kacper..I went back and looked at that picture....it is not a bulkhead (which is structural) that I see but rather some water damage to the teak above the port settee. No big deal if it was just a leak from the windows above and the leak has been fixed. Obviously...you need to see for yourelf but that is what it looks like to me.
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  #15  
Old 01-31-2007
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Kacper,

Catalina would not be considered a bluewater boat... though I always cringe at that term. It is considered a coastal cruiser. In my definition of a coastal cruiser, it is a boat that is typically very roomy and comfortable down below, with the emphasis on liveability versus crossing oceans. A good coastal cruiser will be able to take several days offshore in good to moderate conditions without endangering the crew.

A blue water boat, in my opinion, is a very strong, very sturdy boat set up for ocean corssings. They are typically tight down below and tight in the cockpit. Livability is second to safety for long ocean crossings (2 weeks or beter at sea). They will take longer beatings from seas and storms and given two captains of equal skill, are more likely to survive the worst nature has to throw at it.

Now... which one do you need? If you are going to cross the Pacific (which Catalinas have done, incidentally), if you are going to Australia, around the horn, the red sea, across the Atalantic on your way to the islands... then by all means: go buy a good, solid "blue water" boat. However, if you are priamrily going to be living on your boat and exploring this hemisphere, not only do you not need a blue water boat, it would be as bad of a decision as taking a Catalina across the Pacific.

If you will also notice, I said given two equal captains. The captain will play the key role in how you survive... not the boat. For some reason I fail to understand, people are always so focused on the best electronics and toughest boats as going to save their butts from their total lack of seamanship and knowledge of offshore passagemaking and storm survival. Bottom line is, with you knowledge, you probably cannot afford a solid blue water boat and it is the WRONG decision for you... as much as you would not buy a Lexus to haul cow **** around. Go buy a Ford. It is not built as well, but it serves a different purpose the Lexus "should" not fill and was not inteded for.

In the realm of coastal cruisers, there are better ones and better constructed ones, and there are worse ones down to flat junk. Boats are very expensive. Even a cheap coastal cruiser will cost you many, many tens of thousands. You can get cheaper ones... but if you do, you better bet there is a reason for it. Maintenance on a boat is high. Slippage and insurance is out of this world (especially in the seast).

I am not trying to scare you off. I hope you do buy a boat and a nice one. For all of its expenses and headaches, it is a very rewarding lifestyle. But it is not a cheap lifestyle. I think you will be best served with a good, solid coastal cruiser like a Jeauneau, Beneteau or Catalina and would be poorly served by a Valiant, Hylas, Hallberg-Rassy, or any other super bluewater vessel. You are also better served increasing your $$ upfront for a boat that will cost you less after you sign your name. I am concerned at the budeted amount you have alloted, you are going to get a lemon and will be spending more money just to keep it floating than you paid for it.

These are just my opinions. Others may differ. I hope that helps.

- CD
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Old 01-31-2007
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Hey CD,

Well, it appears that most used Catalinas here are in my price range, so I'm not too worried about getting a lemon Catalina I'm also in the financial position to afford all those outrageous slip fees and maintainance, etc Sign me up!

I do want to cross the Pacific, and head over to the South Pacific, but I want to cruise the gulf islands here first.

I'm not sure if I understood correctly... You're saying I do NOT need a blue water boat to head down the coast to Mexico for example? Or did you mean just "up and down the coast."

I definitely want to do some serious Ocean sailing within the next year, after I cruise up and down the gulf islands for a while and practice some heaving to in gale conditions off the coast.

So I am thinking... if I am going to get a coastal cruiser now, I would have to sell it and buy a blue water boat later for the Pacific crossings... That kind of would be a pain in the butt.

Unless I own two boats, and I don't know if That's a good idea, lol

Decisions, decisions.

I realize that my budget is a little too low for a quality blue water boat. I might have to wait a bit longer and venture into the 35K - 50K range if I go in that direction.

Coastal cruisers here are very cheap, as there are so many of them... because ovbviously BC is one of the greatest coastal cruising places

Kacper
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  #17  
Old 01-31-2007
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Let me know what you guys think:

Catalina 27' for 14,000 Canadian
http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi..._id=11024&url=
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  #18  
Old 01-31-2007
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The boat seems fine. Old boat though. Before you get too focused on crossing the big pond, you better really spend some time in a good storm offshore. It seems to have a way of changing peoples minds. Instead of dropping (not 50k) more like 150-200k in a really used blue water, go spend all the time you can in the islands. THere are some tricky parts on the trip down to the baha. You will have to watch your weather closely. Once inside, short of hurricanes, you are pretty well off. I have not done this... this is hear-say. I always try to tell people when this is not something I have done so you just get first-hand knowledge from me. However, very good friends of ours did this and spent 5 years down there (Mexico) - so it is second-hand knowledge, so to speak.

I have sailed the S california coast. It is nice.

Short of Oregon, you will probably be ok in a catalina. Watch your track through Oregon. Not a lot of places to duck. I would take a catalina down that coast... but it would probably be a larger boat. Not the one you are looking at.

I don't know if I have been much help... but I have been honest. Ask some others about their cruising experience down that coast and what they have experienced. Most sailors/cruisers are quick to share.

- CD
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  #19  
Old 01-31-2007
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To correct the record.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H
Then there is the whole grounding issue. In 2002, the Naval Academy did a study of keel types and grounding. They found that the popular perception that wing keels are harder to free is accurate. In their study, wing keels were extremely harder to free. Straight fins were much easier to free, especially when heeled, and the easiest keel to free was the bulb keel.

Jeff
Jeff -- How about correcting your boilerplate by removing the above statement? As you know, that Naval Academy study did not mention wing keels at all. It compared a fin keel to a bulb keel for the design that became the new Navy 44. It wasn't done specifically to study grounding anyway.

Thanks.
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  #20  
Old 01-31-2007
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CD gives good advice...a larger Catalina could do that trip at the right time of year with a good forecast but only with a well experienced crew. I'd be hesitant to attempt the trip myself and I would be VERY careful even in something like a Cat42. Since you are looking at smaller boats and you definitely plan to head all the way south and hope to cross the Pacific...I would prefer to see you in a real blue water boat. Save your $$ and go for the real thing you need.
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