Long Distance Small Boat Sailing - Page 11 - SailNet Community
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post #101 of 114 Old 05-05-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by akoutdoors1
Sorry folks, sometimes my dog gets on here and rants. He needs therapy.
My logistics are worked out. If I run into any trouble with them, I'll ask. I really will. Of course, I'll ask about something like how much denatured alchohol to bring and, instead, someone will tell me I'm irresponsible because I should take two stocking caps.
Actually I would recommend buying some high proof everclear instead of denatured alcholol, works just as well and isn't poison. Heck you can drink it. Unforunately it's not available in Washington state, but I think you can get it in BC?
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post #102 of 114 Old 05-05-2007
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Cape Cod Goldeneye will do everything you want except easy beaching. You will have to step off into the water.
Goldeneye
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post #103 of 114 Old 05-06-2007
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post #104 of 114 Old 10-02-2007
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well from what i've read your gona learn to sail as you go on the trip, good for you, my first boat was a 1971 veture small cabin, 600 lbs swing keel,with a 9.9 merc out board, i watched sail lesons vidioes and went out on the water,
off coast of florida, and survived happily, i moved up to a 85 mac 25' heavier keel swing also good in 18 inches of water and beaching,enough styrofoan to float it with hull blown out [suposedly if it all still there] , comfy to live in,for 3mo. if your an adventurer as you seem to be, there available with trailers and in your bugetin winter time try ebay, a strong 1/2 ton pick up will pull it, try to sail a few weekend b4 you go out for 3 months solo, good luck
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post #105 of 114 Old 10-12-2007
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worth a look at, Sea Pearl, or a Drascombe would be the best choice I think.
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post #106 of 114 Old 10-12-2007
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The endeavour 24 would do it for you...And be within your budget...But the nearest one to you is hard to find, and the ones that are for sale are here in Australia.

I think you need to seriously consider the notion of beachable vs keelboat. A keelboat will do all the other stuff you want better, and given the nature of the beaches and the isolation up there, I would not be ina hurry to beach my only means of transport, given that a change int he weather could beat the crap out of it in very short order and reduce it to confetti on the beach while I stood helplessy by.

Of course, anchoring your only means of transport and going dinghying into land when you are single handing and there is no source of help should you get flipped int he dinghy or just have ti damaged on rocks or drift away because you got carelkess is also a bit fraught.


Still, all in all, I would advise getting a boat that is competent and uncompromising at sailing (points the highest into the wind being the main consideration for sailing in the area you are describing) and then park it in safe_is) deep_is) water when you want to dinghy over to land.

A notion to play with that a friend recently came up with for his dinghy (after rupturing it 18 different times on the sharp shale of his beach) was to inflate the dinghy with two-part expanding foam. It made the dinghy a bit heavier (about 10kg more) but it now doesn't give a damn about running onto sharp rocks, and since he tows it with the bow up and out of the water tied to the pushpit, the fact it no longer deflates makes no difference at all.

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post #107 of 114 Old 10-12-2007
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Roland, Karl and Sasha-

Believe the guy has bought a boat, since he posted a thread more recent than this one about his new purchase.

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post #108 of 114 Old 10-13-2007
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I don't recall, but has anyone mentioned twin keels or bilger type sailboat...seeing beachable keeps coming up.
Just one note on using one, bring your dingy to the hightide mark when embarking on shore...make sure boat is anchored...Make sure dingy is tied up, preferable to the boat as well.
Or you add poop dudty to your daily chores. just take a rubber mat, bring out to where your dog normaly goes, rub in some fresh stuff, clean, bring to boat and when he/she needs to go bad enough, he'll be up on that mat...you know the one you have to clean now.
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post #109 of 114 Old 10-13-2007
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I guess the way that I am reading this, your goal is to camp cruise, essentially pulling up on a beach to sleep at night. It sounds to me like you have an extremely limited budget and you are wrestling with the trade off between being able to beach the boat, and having some additional safety in the form of a ballasted keel. I can't think of any keel boat that is truely capable of being beached and slept on. I can only really think of one boat that would meet the criteria of being a truely beachable cruiser in your price range, and offering sufficient seaworthiness for what you are trying to do, and that would be the old O'day Mariner, which was a centerboard, (some were built with fixed keels used on the Rhodes 19 but that won't work for beaching) overnighter version of the Rhodes 19. You would need to look for one that has buoyancy tanks and a self bailing cockpit, which the earliest ones lacked. (Stuart Marine also built the Mariner as well) Here's an Oday version in Ohio

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...g_id=59089&url=

If you went with the Mariner you would need to rework the sail plan so that ou can easily reef and depower the sails in building conditions. Wilderness cruising like you are proposing takes a lot of sailing skill and careful preparation.

The other obstacle with beach cruising a boat this size is getting it safely up above the tide line and then back down into the water when you were ready to go. I have done a little beach cruising. It can be fun but tricky. You always seem to be wet. Boom tents help expand living space at night and modern waterproof bags help a lot.

Another way to go would be to build your own small cruiser. Phil Bolger and Charlie Wittholz both designed small plywood catboats that would work well for what you wish to do but which probably cost more to build and equip than your budget would permit, even if you used construction grade materials and did the work yourself.

Good luck, Sounds like a great adventure....
Jeff
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post #110 of 114 Old 10-14-2007
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Realizing this is a stale thread, but...

IF I were planning this adventure -- and an adventure means uncertain outcomes with consequences for failure -- I might look very closely at a Mongomery. Lyle Hess seriously over-designed his boats. Even the 17 footer carries 600 lbs of ballast; they are beamy, therefore roomy; and the shoal keel/centerboard draws under 2'.

Can be had for your $4000 budget. Slow, but solid as can be.

Buccaneer18, Grainnia
SJ21, Diarmuid
Albin Ballad 30, Fionn
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